Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks) Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales” Track’s video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

Terje Rypdal ( Oslo, Norway)

Terje Rypdal Artist’s photo

Image result for terje rypdal

Related Groups :

Dream (6), Jan Garbarek Quartet, Min Bul, Morning Glory (2), Terje Rypdal Trio, Terje Rypdals Orchestra,The Baden-Baden Free Jazz Orchestra, The Chasers, The Esoteric Circle, The George Russell Sextet,The Hugger Muggers, The New Eternal Rhythm Orchestra, The Terje Rypdal Group, The Tomasz Stanko Septet, The Vanguards

Track :

“Dead Man’s Tales” A1 track included on the album “Bleak House”

Album :

“Bleak House”, released on Polydor Records (184 189) in 1968

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Recorded on Oct 7th, 8th and 22nd 1968, at Roger Arnhoff Lydstudio, Oslo, Norway.

A3: “A free form composition based on an idea by T. Rypdal”. The composer credited for B1 is “xxx”.

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

C- Terje Rypdal / guitar, flute, vocals, producer

With:

Christian Reim / piano, organ (3,5)
Carl Magnus Neumann / alto sax & flute (2,5)
Hans Knudsen / baritone sax (2,5)
Jan Garbarek / tenor sax, flute & bells (2-5)
Frode Thingnæs / trombone & tuba (4,5)
Kjell Haugen / trombone (2,4,5)
Tore Nilsen / trombone (2)
Øivind Westby / trombone (2)
Ditlef Eckhoff / trumpet (2)
Jarl Johansen / trumpet (2-5)
Kåre Furuholmen / trumpet (2,4)
Frøydis Ree Hauge / horn (5,6)
Odd Ulleberg / horn (5,6)
Knut Riisnæs / tenor sax (3), arranger & conductor (2,4,5)
Terje Venaas / bass (2-5)
Tom Karlsen / drums (1)
Jon Christensen / drums (2-5)arl Magnus Neumann (tracks: A2 to B2)

Arranged By – Knut Riisnæs (tracks: A2, B1, B2)

Composed By – Terje Rypdal

Engineer [Recording] – Roger Arnhoff

Photography By – Sohlberg Foto

Producer – Terje Rypdal

Recording Supervisor – Odd Løken

Track-list :

1. Dead Man´s Tale (7:03)
2. Wes (4:15)
3. Winter Serenade (6:04):
– a) Falling Snow
– b) Snow Storm
– c) Melting Snow
4. Bleak House (7:05)
5. Sonority (5:21)
6. A Feeling Of Harmony (2:29)

Total time 33:05

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover/track-list photo (back)

Information related to the artist :

“Wikipedia”

Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. He has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as “N3”.

Rypdal was born in Oslo, the son of a composer and orchestra leader. He studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek’s group and later George Russell’s sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany, in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal’s guitar).

His compositions “Last Nite” and “Mystery Man” were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name.

Rypdal was married (1969–1985) to the Norwegian singer Inger Lise Andersen/Rypdal, and they had two children, the auditor Daniel (1970) and the electronica musician Marius (1977). Rypdal was married again in 1988 to Elin Kristin Bergei (born 28 May 1955). They have two children Ane Izabel (1988) and the guitarist Jakob Rypdal (1989). They (as of 2013) live in Tresfjord.

“All Music”

Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal has an instantly recognizable, difficult to peg style, both an as ensemble player and as a soloist. He has directly or indirectly influenced virtually every one of his countrymen who followed him on the instrument. He is also a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and, perhaps most importantly, a world-class composer. He has written six symphonies, numerous chamber works, and sonatas.

Rypdal was born in Oslo in 1947, the son of a conductor and clarinetist for a military band. He began his musical studies on the piano by the age of five, and at eight added trumpet. He abandoned both instruments at age 13 for the guitar. On his chosen instrument, Rypdal was self-taught. Between 1962 and 1967 he was part of the Vanguards, a Norwegian instrumental rock group modeled on the Ventures and the British Shadows, but all that changed when he heard Jimi Hendrix for the first time. Rypdal started the psychedelic rock band Dream in late 1967; they recorded their sole album, Get Dreamy, for Polydor in 1968. That same year he formed another band with saxophonist Jan Garbarek and drummer Jon Christensen, and released his first ambitious meld of rock, classical, and jazz with Bleak House for Polydor under his own name.

Rypdal originally attended the Technical University in Trondheim to become an electrical engineer, but left to study musicology at the University of Oslo. He later attended the Music Conservatory in Oslo (later renamed the Norwegian State Academy of Music) from 1970-1972, where he studied with composers Finn Mortensen and George Russell. Rypdal was part of Garbarek’s quartet for Afric Pepperbird, the saxophonist’s debut for ECM in 1970. He made his debut as a composer with Eternal Circulation in 1971, which was performed with by the Garbarek Quartet and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Rypdal also played with Russell in concert and in the studio, resulting in several offerings including George Russell Presents the Esoteric Circle, and Electric Sonata for Souls Loved by Nature, both issued in 1971. He appeared on Garbarek’s sophomore ECM date Sart, and recorded his self-titled debut for the label (he has been there ever since) that same year. Some of his sidemen for the date included Garbarek, bassist Arild Andersen, and pianist Bobo Stenson. This album walked a generous line between free jazz, progressive, psychedelic rock, and more avant-garde classical music. It established Rypdal as a composer and guitarist throughout Europe.

In 1972, he appeared on the live, star-studded session that was released as Morning Glory in 1973 on Antilles; the other players included John Surman, John Marshall, Chris Laurence, John Taylor, and Malcolm Griffiths. In 1973, Rypdal recorded with Russell again; the ensuing offering was entitled Listen to the Silence. He also composed Concerto for Violbasso and Orchestra for Barre Phillips. He released two of his own albums for ECM in 1974, Whenever I Seem to Be Far Away and What Comes After.

The year 1975 proved monumental for Rypdal. His Symphony No. 1 was commissioned by Norwegian Television, and he released the widely acclaimed double-album Odyssey, which was regarded as the pinnacle of jazz-rock fusion. The Odyssey Band toured the globe and was especially successful in the U.S.A. In 1976, Rypdal did a turnabout, and released the musically impressionistic After the Rain, on which he performed all instruments. He also recorded with Russell but went back to his ensemble work with 1978’s Waves. Rypdal finished the ’70s with a trio date, co-billed with collaborators bassist Miroslav Vitous and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

He commenced the new decade with Descendre, a trio session with Christensen and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Rypdal played keyboards and flute in addition to guitar. To Be Continued, the second album with Vitous and DeJohnette, appeared in 1981. After touring and an extended break during which he worked on his classical composing, Rypdal emerged with his first duet album for ECM, the vanguard classical, electro-acoustic work, Eos in 1984. The guitarist returned to a trio format for The Chaser and Blue in 1985 and 1986, respectively. The latter year also saw the release of a 1970 date he and Garbarek had recorded with the George Russell Sextet, A Trip to Prillargui, released on Soul Note. Rypdal also recorded his groundbreaking modern classical work, Undisonus in 1986 (though it wouldn’t see release for four more years) and composed two more symphonies. In 1989 he released The Singles Collection, a jazz-rock quartet date that focused on exceedingly brief compositions.

The album, Undisonus for Violin and Orchestra / Ineo for Choir and Chamber Orchestra, was finally released in 1990 to massive critical acclaim, and received the “Work of the Year” prize from the Society of Norwegian Composers. It was followed by the long-form work Q.E.D. in 1993, and the jazz-cum-neo-classical fusion set If Mountains Could Sing in 1995. Also that year, Rypdal recorded as a session player with pianist and composer Ketil Bjørnstad’s group on The Sea, and as part of Surman’s ensemble on Nordic Quartet, both issued on ECM. In 1997, the guitarist issued Skywards, a sextet date that walked the line between formal jazz composition and free improvisation. He finished the decade with Bjørnstad on The Sea II, and a guitar duet recording with Ronni Le Tekrø entitled Tekro II on the Grappa label, both in 1998.

Rypdal began the 21st century busier than ever. In addition to receiving commissions to compose, he was part of Markus Stockhausen’s ensemble on Karta, and saw his own Double Concerto/Fifth Symphony issued by ECM. In 2002, his five-movement work, Lux Æterna for soprano, chamber ensemble, organ, trumpet, and guitar, a second album with Tekrø entitled The Radiosong, and his Sonata Op. 73/Nimbus Op. 76 with violinist Birgitte Stærnes, were all released on different labels. In 2006, Vossabrygg, a live sextet date from 2003 inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew group and early Weather Report, was released by ECM. The date also featured an appearance by Rypdal’s son Marius on turntables and samplers. Life in Leipzig, a duet offering with Bjørnstad, followed in 2008. The large-ensemble tribute to film noir, Crime Scene, appeared in 2010, as did Very Much Alive, a mammoth six-disc concert run by jazz drummer Paolo Vinaccia that featured the guitarist Ståle Storløkken and Mikkelborg. After several festival appearances, the completion of commissions, and some time off, Rypdal returned to recording with 2013’s The Melodic Warrior and large-scale ensemble work conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

“Progarchives”

Born 23 August 1947 (Oslo, Norway)

He is known as one of the leading modern jazz guitarists in Europe. At the same time he is regarded to be an outstanding composer of contemporary art music. Rypdal has has a multifarious musical career since he started his pop band “The Vanguards” in the 1960’ies. He later started up “Dream” where his interest for jazz was awakened. In 1969 he joined the Jan Garbarek Quartet. At the same time he even played in George Russell’s Sextet and big band. Rypdal has up through the years composed numerous jazz compositions for own as well as other groups.

Terje Rypdal played the piano from he was five years old, and started up with guitar from the age of 13. As a guitarist he is self-taught. He has studied musicology at the University in Oslo. During the years 1970-72 he studied composition with Finn Mortensen at the Music Conservatory in Oslo (Later the Norwegian State Academy of Music). He has also studied improvisation with George Russell.

As a composer Rypdal received his first impulses from Ligeti, Penderecki and Mahler and he soon developed his own style. His début as a composer was with “Eternal Circulation” (1971), performed with Jan Garbarek Quartet and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Among his works can be mentioned: Symphony No. 1 (1975) commissioned by the Norwegian Television. His opera “Orfeo Turns Around and Watches Eurydice”, premiered in 1972 at the Henie Onstad Art Centre outside Oslo. For the American bass player Barre Phillipps we wrote his “Concerto per violbasso e orchestra” (1973). His violin concerto “Undisonus” received the prize “Work of the Year” by the Society of Norwegian Composers. He has composed five symphonies, several works for solo instruments with orchestra, two operas and a large number of contemporary works with participation of jazz musicians.

Terje Rypdal’s compositions witness his versatile musical work, his rich imagination and solid knowledge. One can find poetic moments with an almost impressionistic colour as well as constellations of sound with elements from jazz, late romanticism and avantgardism. In addition to his large production of modern art music he has also a great number of jazz and rock compositions.

with courtesy of the Music Information Centre Norway.

Photos related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album  photo (A’ Side)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the artist :

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TERJE RYPDAL 1 (2).png

Links related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”Video file link on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Download Link on “Opium Hum”Blog

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Review on “Paste Magazine”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Apple Music”

Links related to the artist :

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Discogs”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “ECM Records”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on IMDb

Terje Rypdal on “Notes On The Road” Terje Rypdal’s Odyssey: New York and Beyond the Infinite An interview with Terje Rypdal from 2012 by Gideon Egger and Ying Zhu

Terje Rypdal Shows on “Mixcloud”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Deezer”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Apple Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Getty Images”

 

 

 

Hard Rock, Heavy Progressive Rock, Krautrock, Germany 1970s (Tracks) McOil – “Sailing Around”

McOil – “Sailing Around” Track’s Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Hard Rock, Heavy Progressive Rock, Krautrock, Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Band :

McOil (Ochsenhausen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany)

German hard-edged rock band from Ochsenhausen (formed in 1976), with a typically German sound, akin to Jane, Harlis, Eloy, etc.
Taken from the book “The Crack In The Cosmic Egg”, Steven Freeman, Alan Freeman, ISBN: 0-95295-06-0-X, Leicester 1997.

Members :

Norbert Kuhpfahl (bass), Karl Wild (guitar, vocals), Andy Tischmann (drums, percussion), Doris Tischmann (keyboards, vocals), Walter Utz (keyboards, vocals), Rudolph Scheich (drums, percussion), Dieter Eisenmann (guitar)

Track :

“Sailing Around” (written by Walter Ulz) B2 track included on the album “All Our Hopes”

Album :

“All Our Hopes” released as a private press release (0010 sk) in 1979. Reissued by Garden Of Delight Records (CD 004) in 2000

Recorded at EGE-Sound-Studio in August/September 1979
Mixed in October  1979

McOil – “All Our Hopes” Full Album Video on YouTube

Line-up/Credits :

Bass – Norbert Kuhpfahl

Drums – Andy Tischmann

Guitar, Backing Vocals – Karl Wild

Keyboards, Vocals – Walter Utz

Producer, Mixed By – Dieter Ege

Track-list :

01. Be Careful – 4:11
02. All Our Hopes – 9:26
03. This Time Should Never End – 8:09
04. Mask Of Life – 4:58
05. Sailing Around – 5:56
06. Once In The Summernight – 3:58
07. What’s This Live – 5:56

Bonus:

08. A Better Day – 4:15

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Garden Of Delights”

Prime time for progressive rock had already passed by when in 1979 McOil released their album ‘All our hopes’ in an edition of 1000 copies the style of which must be classified as a heavier type of progressive rock. As well as the bonus track taken from the band’s one and only single the original master tapes could be used for mastering the CD as they were in perfect condition due to excellent storage in the Ege sound studio. Almost unknown until now are early recordings of ‘Be careful’ and ‘Sailing around’ from the compilation ‘Rocksession ’79’ (AVC K 793203ST, February 1979), at that time with female vocals.

Walter Utz (key, voc), Norbert Kupfahl (b), Karl Wild (g, voc), Andy Tischmann (dr)

The Garden of Delights label recovers and restores half-forgotten recordings from the field of progressive rock music in all its different shades, ranging from psychedelic to fusion to blues-rock, provided that there are progressive elements in it. In its original sense, progressive means that these recordings were ahead of their time and did not go with the tide. This almost unavoidably meant that only a small circle of people knew about them. Most of them were released in the seventies in very small editions, on LP’s which can hardly be afforded any more today. These lost collectors’ items are now being made available on CD on Garden of Delights. Besides the costly remastering, special importance has been attached to making lavish, thick CD booklets providing everything worth knowing about the artists (as well as many rare photos), all of which come from the German-speaking countries.

“Cosmic Minds At Play”

“The group merged symphonic rock and hard rock into a style comparable to Jane and the polished “Sky” rock. Mc Oil were the quartet of Wlter Utz (keyboards, vocals), Norbert Kuhpfahl (bass), Karl Wild (guitar, background vocals), and Andy Tischmann (drums).In 1978 they released their single “Mask Of Lif” coupled with “A Better Day” (AVC Production). The following album “All Our Hopes” was recorded at the Ege Sound Studio from August to September 1979 and originally released in a limited edition of 1,000 copies.

Photos related to the album/track :

McOil – “All Our Hopes” Album photo (A’ Side)

McOil – “All Our Hopes” Album cover photo (front)

McOil – “All Our Hopes” Album cover photo (back)

McOil – “All Our Hopes” C.D. cover photo (front)

McOil – “All Our Hopes” C.D. cover photo (back)

McOil – “All Our Hopes” C.D. photo 

Photos related to the band :

Links related to the album/track :

McOil – “Sailing Around” Track’s Video link on “YouTube

McOil – “All Our Hopes” Full Album Download Link on “Krautrock Maniac” Blog

Links related to the band :

McOil Band’s Page on “Discogs”

McOil Band’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

 

 

Classic Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Blues Rock, Heavy Progressive Rock, U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Wishbone Ash – “Phoenix”

Wishbone Ash – “Phoenix” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Category/Music Genres :

Classic Rock, Hard Rock, Heavy Blues Rock, Heavy Progressive Rock, U.K. 1970s (Tracks) 

Band :

Wishbone Ash (Torquay, Devon, U.K.)

Wishbone Ash Band’s photo, 1970

Members :

Andy Powell (guitar, vocals), Steve Upton (drums, 1969-90), Martin Turner (vocals, bass, 1969-80, 1987-91, 1995-96), Ted Turner (guitar, vocals, 1969-74, 1987-94), Laurie Wisefield (guitar, vocals, 1974-85), John Wetton (bass, vocals, 1980-81), Trevor Bolder (bass, vocals, 1981-83), Claire Hamill(vocals, 1981-82), Mervyn “Spam” Spence [aka O’Ryan] (bass, vocals, 1983-86), Jamie Crompton(guitar, vocals, 1985), Phil Palmer (guitar, vocals, 1985-87), Andy Pyle (bass, vocals, 1986-87, 1991-94), Robbie France (drums, 1990-91), Ray Weston (drums, 1991-94, 1997-2007), Mike Sturgis (drums, 1994-97), Roger Filgate (guitar, vocals, 1994-97), Tony Kishman (vocals, bass, 1994-95, 1996-97), Bob Skeat (bass, vocals, 1997-present), Mark Birch (guitar, vocals, 1997-2001), Ben Granfelt (guitar, vocals, 2001-04), Muddy Manninen (guitar, vocals, 2004-17), Joe Crabtree (drums, 2007-present), Mark Abrahams (guitar, 2017-present)

Related Artists :

Asia, Blast Room, Blue Meanies, Diamond Head, The Empty Vessels, Gringos Locos, Mistakes, Phenomena, Uriah Heep

Track :

“Phoenix” (written by Wishbone Ash) B2 track (closing track) included on the album “Wishbone Ash”

Album :

“Wishbone Ash” released on MCA Records ( MKPS 2014) on 4th December 1970 (recorded in September 1970, De Lane Lea Studios, London)

Wishbone Ash is the first studio album by Wishbone Ash. It peaked at No. 29 in the UK Albums Chart in January 1971.

Line-up/Credits :

Andy Powell – lead guitar, vocals

Ted Turner – lead guitar, vocals

Martin Turner – bass, vocals

Steve Upton – drums

Art Direction, Design – John C. LePrevost

Engineer – Martin Birch

Executive-Producer [Executive Production For The U.S.A.] – Don Shain

Photography By – Gene Brownell

Producer – Derek Lawrence

Written-By – Powell, Turner, Upton, Turner

Companies :

Published By – Miles Music (2)

Recorded At – De Lane Lea Studios

Copyright (c) – MCA Records International

Licensed From – MCA Records International

Manufactured By – The Decca Record Company Limited

Printed By – Moore & Matthes Ltd.

This version comes in a gatefold sleeve and has pink and red labels.

Track-list :

1. Blind Eye (3:42)
2. Lady Whiskey (6:11)
3. Error Of My Ways (6:56)
4. Queen Of Torture (3:21)
5. Handy (11:36)
6 Phoenix (10:27)

Total Time: 42:23

Lyrics :

Bird rise high from the cinders
Leave it all far behind
All the ruins and the fire

Bird raise your head from the ashes
Many men lay dead
You can see them like I

Phoenix rise
Raise your head to the sky

Information related to the album/track :

“All Music”

For a band that quickly evolved into a radio-friendly prog-leaning outfit, it’s a wonder that Wishbone Ashstarted out as the boogie and blues-based group that this debut reveals. If the term “jam band” existed in 1970, Wishbone Ash surely would have been a major player in that genre. As it was, this album stacked up nicely when compared with other British hard rock releases that year. Not as complex or calculated as Led Zeppelin’s Led Zeppelin III but definitely more focused than Mott the Hoople’s Mad Shadows, Wishbone Ash more closely resembled Benefit by Jethro Tull, a group that hadn’t yet adopted its own progressive elements. The dual lead guitar attack of Andy Powell and Ted Turner was a component that none of the above bands possessed, but unfortunately their (shared) lead vocals lacked the punch and authority necessary for hard rock bands to be taken seriously. So while they could rock as loudly and convincingly as virtually anyone, their lead singers, perhaps, held them back from being the force they should have been. The follow-up, Pilgrimage, took steps to rectify Wishbone Ash’s odd position, but this album nevertheless opened eyes and ears and revealed to the rock & roll community a band with incredible potential and talent.

Information related to the band :

“Progarchives”

Founded in Torquay, UK in 1969 – Still active as of 2017

The history of WISHBONE ASH goes back to 1966, when drummer Steve Upton of the ‘Scimitars’ joined bassist Martin Turner and Martin’s brother Glen in the band ‘The Empty Vessels’. The trio named themselves ‘Tanglewood’ and moved to London. Glen Turner quit soon and was replaced by Ted Turner of Birmingham band ‘King Biscuit’. The line-up was finalised by guitarist Andy Powell (Ex-‘Sugarband’). The two guitarists developed a melodic twin guitar lead style that would become the trademark of ‘Wishbone Ash’.

In 1970 WISHBONE ASH released their self titled first record, establishing a mixture of Blues-Rock, Jazz and English Folk, that the band would elaborate on in their following records. The production work by Martin Birch was excellent and the record contains the masterpiece ‘Phoenix’, that would become a ‘Wishbone Ash’ live classic and give way to elaborate improvisations on stage. At the same time the band would start to use lyrics and imagery drawn from mythology and fantasy. like ‘The King will come’, ‘Throw down the sword’, ‘Persephone’ & ‘Argus’.

In 1971 ‘Wishbone Ash’ released ‘Pilgrimage’ and a year later ‘Argus’, both records bringing the WISHBONE ASH sound to perfection by introducing elaborate vocal arrangements and sophisticated instrumental passages. Both records are masterpieces. In 1973 the band released their fourth LP, ‘Wishbone Four’, and toured Europe, documented by their live release ‘Live Dates’ (1973) and followed by an extended America Tour. In 1974 Ted Turner left and was replaced by Laurie Wisefield (Ex-Home) who added steel guitar and banjo to the ‘Wishbone Ash’ sound on their 1974 release ‘There’s The Rub’. During the rest of the seventies the new line-up recorded a series of good but less interesting records.

In 1987 the original line-up re-united for a series of records, including the all instrumental ‘Nouveau Calls’ (1988), before going again though a series of line-up changes. At the end of the 90’s the band found a new stability with founding guitarist Andy Powell, bass player Bob Skeat and drummer Ray Weston, joined in 2004 by Finnish guitarist Muddy Manninen.

‘Pilgrimage’ and ‘Argus’ are highly recommended.

“All Music”

During the early and mid-’70s, Wishbone Ash were among England’s most popular hard rock acts. The group’s roots dated to the summer of 1966, when drummer Steve Upton formed a band called Empty Vessels with bassist/vocalist Martin Turner and guitarist Glen Turner. Empty Vessels soon changed their name to Tanglewood and moved to London; during a gig at the Country Club in Hampstead, they were seen by would-be rock manager Miles Copeland, who was impressed with the jazz and progressive rock influences within the band and offered to be their manager.

Glen Turner left the band at that point, and an advertisement for a guitarist resulted in the addition of both David Alan “Ted” Turner and Andy Powell, who provided the basis for the sound of the new lineup with intertwining riffs and phrases drawn from both soul and blues, coupled with Martin Turner’s melodic bass sound and Upton’s jazz-influenced drumming. A new name was called for, and after several suggestions by Copeland that proved unacceptable, “Wishbone Ash” was chosen from two lists of words. The group rehearsed for weeks at Copeland’s home, working out an entirely new repertoire, and played their first gig opening for the Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation. It wasn’t too long before they were opening for Deep Purple, where a soundcheck jam between Powell and Ritchie Blackmore led to a recording contract with the American Decca label.

Their self-titled first album appeared in 1970; Pilgrimage and Argus followed over the next two years, and each showed a major advance in the band’s sound. The release of 1973’s Wishbone Four reflected a greater maturity to the group, and was their first fully developed album, with songwriting that didn’t hide behind a progressive pose but luxuriated in the members’ folk music inclinations, without compromising the harder edge of their music. The album also saw the departure of Ted Turner, who was replaced by Laurie Wisefield.

Locked In and New England followed; Martin Turner departed after 1979’s Just Testing, to be replaced by ex-King Crimson bassist/singer John Wetton. Wishbone Ash soldiered on through the ’80s, and in 1986 even got back with Copeland, by then a major player in the recording industry by virtue of his management of the Police and his founding of I.R.S. Records. Wishbone Ash’s history came full circle with the reunion of Powell, Upton, Ted Turner, and Martin Turner, who recorded three albums for I.R.S. They remained a working band into the ’90s, led by Andy Powell and Ted Turner and touring and recording regularly, though Upton quit the band.

Martin Turner was replaced in 1993 after the band recorded The Ash Live in Chicago. He was replaced by returnee Andy Pyle, who remained only until 1994. Powell, the lone original member of the band, enlisted guitarist/songwriter Roger Filgate, bassist/vocalist Tony Kishman, and drummer Mike Sturgis for a European tour in 1995. When Kishman, weary from touring with Ash while working with other musicians in the United States, took a breather, Martin Turner finished the tour for him. Kishman returned to resume vocal duties on Wishbone Ash’s 1996 studio effort Illuminations. In the aftermath, everyone but Powell quit again. He utilized a revolving-door approach to musicians and took the unusual step — at the end of the first wave of rave culture — of releasing two electronic dance albums on Invisible Hands Music that grafted synthetic beats onto Wishbone Ash guitar riffs. Trance Visionary was first, spawning a four-mix 12″ that was a dancefloor smash and reached 38 on the U.K. dance chart, followed by the less successful yet critically acclaimed Psychic Terrorism.

In 2000, for the band’s 30th anniversary, the acoustic collection Bare Bones was issued just before they hit the road to celebrate. While the personnel continued to shift and change, it didn’t prevent Powell and company from recording Bona Fide, a back-to-basics studio date issued in 2002 before the band toured America with Savoy Brown. In 2004, Finnish guitarist Muddy Manninen joined the band, replacing guitarist Ben Granfelt who had been a member since 2001. In 2006, the band issued Clan Destiny before the departure of longtime drummer Ray Weston. He was replaced by Joe Crabtree, who made his recorded debut with the group on 2007’s Power of Eternity. Other than touring, the band was inactive until 2011 when they issued their 23rd album, Elegant Stealth, with the same lineup. Since 2004, Turner has taken to touring with a band called Martin Turner’s Wishbone Ash. Powell sued and won the sole right to the name in 2013. When the acclaimed Blue Horizon appeared in 2014, it marked the third straight studio recording to feature the same lineup — the longest-standing roster in Wishbone Ash’s history. Manninen left after the tour and was replaced by guitarist Mark Abrahams. In 2018, the band’s 12th album, Twin Barrels Burning, was remastered and reissued by Cherry Red.

Photos related to the album/track :

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Album’s cover photo (front)

WISHBONE ASH 1970

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Album’s photo (A’ Side)

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Album’s photo (B’ Side)

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Album’s Artwork photo

Photos related to the band :

Image result for wishbone ash 1970

Image result for wishbone ash 1970

 

Image result for wishbone ash bass player

Image result for olde english bulldogge

Image result for wishbone ash 73 tour

Image result for wishbone ash the essential collection

Image result for wishbone ash 1970

Image result for wishbone ash live 1970

Image result for wishbone ash wishbone four

Links related to the album/track :

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Wishbone Ash – “Phoenix” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Wishbone Ash – “Wishbone Ash” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Wishbone Ash _ “Wishbone Ash” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Google Play”

Links related to the band :

Wishbone Ash Website related to the band

Wishbone Ash Band’s Homepage

Wishbone Ash “Martin Turner’s Homepage”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Facebook”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Homepage on “Twitter”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Discogs”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Songfacts”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Spotify”

Wishbone Ash – Band’s Page on “Bandcamp”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

Wishbonen Ash Band’s Page on “Google Play”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Deezer”

Wishbone Ash Band’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Acid, Garage, Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s The Open Mind – “Magic Potion”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Category/Music Genres :

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Acid/Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s

Band :

The Open Mind (London, Greater London, U.K.)

British rock band from London, late 1960s, originally called The Apaches, later renamed to The Drag Set before the were called The Open Mind.
Mike Brancaccio (guitar, vocals) Timothy du Feu (bass) Phil Fox (drums) Terry Schindler aka Terry Martin (guitar, vocals)

The Open Mind Band’s photo 

Open Mind_band

Related Artists :

Armada

Also known as :

The Apaches, The Drag Set

Track :

“Magic Potion” (written by  Mike “Bran” Brancaccio), (A’ Side single) released on Philips Records (BF 1805) in 1969

Open Mind_label

The track is also included on the reissue edition of the album “Open Mind” (originally released on Philips Records SBL 7893, in 1969), released on Antar Records (ANTAR 2), released in 1986

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Original edition on Philips Records (sbl 7893), album’s cover photo (front)

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Reissue edition on Antar Records,  album’s cover photo (front)

THE OPEN MIND 1 (2)

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

B’ Side single “Cast A Spell”

The Open Mind – “Cast A Spell” (B’ Side Single) Track’s Video on YouTube

Line-up :

Mike Brancaccio – Guitar, Vocals
Timothy De Feu – Bass
Phil Fox – Drums
Terry Martin – Guitar, Vocals
Jon Anderson briefly sang in the band but left before the recordings to form Yes.

Lyrics :

Take a drink from my magic potion
Do you wanna really feel fine?
What’s if?
And you will see things you never saw before
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Hold on my son, there’s a different world
Appearing in front of my eye
If you don’t wanna try this potion
Leave it all for me
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Take a drink from my magic potion
Tell me, do you still feel fine?
What’s if?
And you will see things you never saw before
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
Oh, I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Songwriters: Michael Brancaccio
Information related to the track :
“Pop Matters”
“Magic Potion” is psychedelia purged of all whimsy and wonder and utopian overtones; instead is a feeling of churning menace — underscored by apocalyptic hoof-beat drumming, quasi-raga licks, and droning open-string riffs played through thick distortion and a truly toxic wah-wah — that makes it hard to believe when singer Terry Martin bellows, “Upon my soul, I feel fine”. You get a sense of the incipient danger in “seeing things you never saw before”: you get the feeling these would not be cellophane flowers and marmalade skies, but something chthonic and unspeakable. On the whole, the song is unbelievably heavy without being ponderous, and seems like a prescient blueprint for late 1990s stoner rock.
Information related to the band :
“Wikiwand”

The Open Mind was an English psychedelic rock band formed in London, and active in the 1960s and 1970s.

Overview

The band was formed in 1963 by four musicians from Putney, South West London. Initially named The Apaches formed by Tim du Feu, Mike Brancaccio and Philip Fox and their friend Ray Nye. Nye left in 1965 and another friend, Terry Schindler, joined instead. The band became The Drag Set, who released a little-known single in February 1967, “Day and Night” / “Get Out of My Way”. Shortly thereafter, they changed their name to The Open Mind and in July 1969 released a self-titled LP which has since become a highly sought-after collectible. The band, however, is best known for its druggy August 1969 single, “Magic Potion”, which did not appear on the album.

The Open Mind disbanded in 1973; its members wanted to move into jazz-influenced music, but The Open Mind was too well known as a psychedelic band. The band members (minus Phil Fox) went on to form Armada, which lasted about three years but did not release any recorded material.

Despite their paucity of recorded material, The Open Mind have proven to be influential in the psychedelic rock genre, their single “Magic Potion” having been covered by bands such as The Seers, Sun Dial and The Damned.

Band members

  • Mike Bran, a.k.a. Mike Brancaccio – lead guitar, vocals, piano (born 17 April 1946, Rome, Italy)
  • Timothy du Feu – bass guitar (born 31 May 1944, Malvern, Worcestershire, England)
  • Philip Fox – drums (born 26 August 1946, Westminster, South West London)
  • Ray Nye – guitar, vocals
  • Terry Martin, a.k.a. Terry Schindler – guitar, vocals (born 26 August 1945, Holborn, West Central London)

Discography

Singles

  • “Horses and Chariots” b/w “Before My Time” (Philips BF 1790) May, 1969
  • “Magic Potion” b/w “Cast a Spell” (Philips BF 1805) August, 1969
The Drag Set
  • “Day and Night” b/w “Get Out of My Way” 7″ single (Go AJ 11405) May, 1967

Album

  • The Open Mind LP (Philips 7893) (July 1969)

The Open Mind was reissued on CD on the Acme Records and Second Battle labels. The two non-LP songs from the single are included as bonus tracks.

“Rockasteria”
he band was formed in the mid 1960s by four musicians from Putney, South London.Initially named The Drag Set, they released a little-known single in February 1967, “Day and Night”/”Get Out of My Way”. Shortly thereafter, they changed their name to The Open Mind and in July 1969 released a self-titled LP which has since become a highly sought-after collectible.
The Open Mind produced one of the finest UK psychedelic albums, which is excellent throughout and hardly contains a bad track. The music is characterised by some particularly strong psychedelic guitar work and good vocals. It’s impossible really to pull-out particular tracks as highlights – they’re almost all equally good.
Fortunately this album was re-released and this has made this classic piece of 60’s Freakbeat much more accessible to collectors of 60’s psychedelia. The reissue includes their second rare 45 release, which unlike the first wasn’t taken from the album and is superb. A blistering 45 with tasty psychedelic fuzz guitar work. The band, however, is best known for its druggy August 1969 single, “Magic Potion”, which did not appear on the album.
“Cosmic Mind At Play”

This outfit from Putney in South London had previously been known as The Drag Set, rubbing shoulders with The Soft Machine and a newly-arrived-in-the-UK Jimi Hendrix, and coming to the attention of producer Joe Meek and recording a couple of songs with him just days before he took his own life. They released a fine mod/freakbeat single on the CBS subsidiary Go in March 1967, ‘Day and Night / Get Out Of My Way’.

Changing name to The Open Mind at the end of 1967, the group played hip London venues such as The Electric Garden, UFO and Happening 44, and gained a residency at The Marquee where they were sometimes fronted by future Yes man Jon Anderson, who at the time went by the name Hans Christian.

Boxing impresario Benny Huntsman landed the band a deal with Philips on the condition that his son Roger became their manager (though in effect it was Benny who ran the show), and their excellent self-titled album on that label was recorded in 1968, though not released until July 1969. It included both sides of their debut single ‘Horses and Chariots / Before My Time’ from May of that year, as well as a revamped version of the a-side of The Drag Set 45 with the new title ‘Girl I’m So Alone’. The group appeared in Philip’s New Faces of 1969 promotional film alongside the likes of The Barrier, Ambrose Slade and Procession, miming ‘Horses and Chariots’.

The Open Mind’s second single, released in August 1969, consisted of two new tracks and is perhaps the pinnacle of their recorded output. The a-side ‘Magic Potion’ is a sublime example of heavy psychedelia with its fuzzy rhythm guitar, snaking lead guitar lines, and druggy lyrics. The arrival of the wah-wah in the break is perfectly judged, and there is some truly thunderous drumming throughout, especially in the outro.

Flip side ‘Cast a Spell’ is a little less high voltage but retains the fuzzy guitars and perhaps is even more catchy with its “It’s all in the mind” refrain. This is a fearsome double sider. A jewel in the crown of Brit-psych you might say!

When Benny Huntsman died of a heart attack the band ended up being financed by the Richardson family, part of London’s criminal underworld. Promoters were loathe to book them when they learned of this and with gigs petering out and psychedelia on the wane The Open Mind broke up.

Reissues: Both sides of the 45 are on the essential Rubble Volume 1 (what an eye opener that was for me into the delightful world of British psychedelia and freakbeat), and also on the vinyl British Psychedelic Trip Volume 3 (part of another great compilation series, though with a fair amount of overlap with the Rubbles).

Photos related to the album/track :

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Single photo (A’ Side)

THE OPEN MIND MAGIC POTION 1 (2)

Photos related to the band :

Tim Dufeu

The Drag Set

Related image

Image result for open mind band

Links related to the album/track :

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion”Track’s Video on “YouTube”

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Back In Purple” Blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Willie Said” blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on Rock Archeologia” blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album’s Review on “Pop Matters”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Information related to the track on “Magic Potion Net”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” on “45cat”

Links related to the band :

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Discogs”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

The Open Mind Interview with Timothy Dufeu n “It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Time Machine Music” Website

The Open Mind Information related to the band on “Eric Brightwell” Blog

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Armaggedon – “Round”

Armaggedon – “Round” Track’s Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Band :

Armaggedon (Berlin, Germany)

Track :

“Round” (written by Manfred Galatik) A1 track (opening track) included on the album “Armaggedon”, recorded on 25th to 29th July and 4th to 5th August 1970

Album :

“Armaggedon” released on Kuckuck Records ( 2375 003) in 1970

Armaggedon – “Armaggedon” Album cover photo (front)

Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records

This German release from 1970 is an absolute belter of an album. Prog rock with psychedelic edges, Anglo-American inspired bluesrock with complex structures, the guitar of Frank Diez drives this one all the way.

Armaggedon / Armaggedon (1970) is the third album of record label ‘Kuckuck Schallplatten’ (Catalogue: LP (Kuckuck 1970) – No, 2375 003/1103-2).
It’s been reissued in 1990 by Ohrwaschl Munich, based on the original master tapes (Catalogue: CD (Ohrwaschl 1990) – No. OWoo3).
It’s been reissued in March 2011 by Esoteric recordings, they say it’s based on the original master tapes and that it was mastered in London (Catalogue: CD (Esoteric Reactive 2009) – No. ereacd 1016).
There is also a vinyl reprint from 2009 by Missing Vinyl, Athens/Greece. (LP (Missing Vinyl 2009) – No MV009).

Kuckuck Schallplatten is a German record label founded in Munich in August 1969 by Eckart Rahn, Mal Sondock and the advertising agency ConceptData in Munich, growing out of Eckart Rahn’s music publishing company E.R.P. Musikverlag (which was founded on April 1, 1968). It was distributed by Deutsche Grammophon (Polydor). It’s the first German progressive rock-label. It is now the longest-surviving independent label in Germany, possibly the world. Most of its recordings have been reissued on CD, and all are now available as downloads via iTunes/Apple.

Line-up :

Frank Diez – Lead Guitar, Vocals
Manfred Galatik – Keyboards, Bass, Vocals
Michael Nürmberg – Bass, Rhythm Guitar
Jürgen Lorenzen – Drums
Peter Seeger – Vocals, left the band because of health problems before they recorded their one and only LP

Credits :

Arranged By – Armaggedon

Cover – Concept Dat

Engineer – Thomas ”Django” Klemt

Photography By – Atelier Hudalla

Producer – Eckart Rahn

Companies :

Recorded At – Union Studios, Munich

Printed By – Gerhard Kaiser GmbH

Manufactured By – Deutsche Grammophon GmbH

Track-list :

01 – Round (4:12), written by Manfred Galatik
02 – Open (7:31), written by Frank Diez
03 – Oh Man (6:01), written by Frank Diez/Jonas Porst
04 – Rice Pudding (9:40), written by Jeff Beck/Ron Wood/Nick Hopkins/Tony Newman
05 – People Talking (5:02), written by Frank Diez/Manfred Galatik
06 – Better By You, Better Than Me (4:36), written by Gary Wright

Armaggedon – “Armaggedon” Album cover photo (back)/Tracklist photo

Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records

Information related to the band :
The band of the excellent guitar player Frank Diez played British inspired bluesrock with complex structures. They recorded only one single album “Armageddon”, which was published in 1970 on the Kuckuck label and is one of the best hardrock albums of the early seventies. Unfortunately, it remained unnoticed.
Information related to the album/track :
Asbjørnsen, Dag Erik: Cosmic Dreams at Play – A guide to German Progressive and Electronic Rock (Borderline Productions, ISBN 1-899855-01-7)”
Armaggedon’s self-titled album is a heavy progressive masterpiece with excellent, Hendrix-influenced guitar work and vocals by Frank Diez. Armaggedon was the start of Diez long and impressive career. Their album has six tracks, and two of them are cover versions. Most impressive is the 10-minute version of Jeff Beck Group’s “Rice Pudding”. This track has some of the greatest heavy guitar riffing to appear on a German record. Their version of Spooky Tooth’s “Better By You, Better Than Me” is also competent enough. In addition, both Frank Diez and Manfred Galatik wrote great songs, as typified by the tracks “People Talking” and “Open”. Michael Nürnberg and Jürgen Lorenzen provide a strong backing. Demand for the group was poor way back in 1970, and Armaggedon soon broke up. Diez later plays with Randy Pie, Karthago, Ihre Kinder (singer: Klaus Kinski), Emergency, Atlantis, Eric Burdon’s Fire Departement, Peter Maffay Band, Konstantin Wecker, Electric Blues Duo. Luckily the Armaggedon album is released on CD in 1991 with a sharp and clean digitally remastered sound (in a limited edition of 1,000 numbered copies).
Photos related to the album/track :
Armaggedon – “Armaggedon Album cover photo (front)
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armaggedon – “Armaggedon Album photo (A’ Side)
Image result for armageddon 1970
Photos related to the band :
From left to right: Jürgen Lorenzen, Frank Diez, Michael Nürnberg and Manfred Galatik
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armaggedon Kuckuck’s flyer
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Links related to the album/track :
Links related to the band :

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s The Music Machine – “The People In Me”

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Track’s Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s

Band :

The Music Machine” (Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.)

The Music Machine was an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1966. Fronted by chief songwriter and lead vocalist Sean Bonniwell, the band cultivated a characteristically dark and rebellious image reflected in an untamed musical approach. Sometimes it made use of distorted guitar lines and hallucinogenic organ parts, punctuated by Bonniwell’s distinctively throaty vocals. Although they managed to attain national chart success only briefly with two singles, the Music Machine is today considered by many critics to be one of the groundbreaking acts of the 1960s. Their style is now recognized as a pioneering force in proto-punk; yet within a relatively short period of time, they began to employ more complex lyrical and instrumental arrangements that went beyond the typical garage band format.

In 1965, the band came together as a folk rock trio known as the Raggamuffins, before expanding to the quintet that was later rechristened the Music Machine. The group was known for their style of dress, clothing themselves in all-black attire. In 1966, the Music Machine was signed to Original Sound, and released its first single “Talk Talk” in the latter half of the year, with it reaching the Top 20 of the Billboard Hot 100. Their debut album (Turn On) The Music Machine and the moderate hit “The People in Me” followed. The band’s original lineup fragmented in late 1967 after managerial and financial disputes. Bonniwell reassembled the group under the name The Bonniwell Music Machine. In 1968, a second album, The Bonniwell Music Machine appeared, but the group disbanded in early 1969.

Track :

“The People In Me” A’ Side Single ((written by Sean Bonniwell), b’ side single “Masculine Intuition”) released on Original Sound Records (OS-67) in 1967

The track is also included on the band’s debut album “(Turn On) The Music Machine” released on Original Sound Records (OSR-LPM-5015)  on 31st December 1966, recorded at RCA Recording Studios, Los Angeles California in  August 1966

Line-up :

The Music Machine :

Sean Bonniwell – Vocals, Guitars
Ron Edgar –  Drums
Mark Landon – Guitar
Keith Olsen – Bass
Doug Rhodes – Organ

Credits :

Producer :  Brian Ross

Lyrics :

Hey, Halright
Sometimes dreamin’
I’m in here schemin’ on you
Collectin’ headers
With nothin’ better to do
Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.
When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do
When you see the people in me
Minus you it’s overdue
While I’m cryin
I’m rectifyin’ the cause
Friends are cheerin’
And I’m hearin’ applause
The train is here you better run
Don’t call me I’ll never come
Unto you
They’re over now the games you play
Just what you’ll do, just what you’ll say
Uh oh you
Middle
Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.
When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do
When you see the people in me
Minus you it’s overdue
Hut, Halright
Songwriters: Sean Bonniwell

Information related to the track :

“Wikipedia”

The People in Me” is a song by the American garage rock band, The Music Machine, written by Sean Bonniwell, and was first released as a track on their debut album (Turn On) The Music Machine in December 1966 on Original Sound Records. The song was also released as the A-side to the group’s second single, which was distributed on January 21, 1967. Like many of Bonniwell’s compositions, “The People in Me”‘s lyrical content featured a gloomy rebellious mood, with eerie lead vocals by Bonniwell, and it explored with a hard-edged variation of psychedelic rock. It also featured guitarist Mark Landon’s wiry distorted guitar melodies, joined by backing vocals near the conclusion of the song.

“The People in Me”, with the flip side “Masculine Intutition”, was the final Music Machine single to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, where it peaked at number 66. Though it was considered a strong follow-up to their debut release “Talk Talk”, the song suffered from inadequate airplay when the band’s management angered radio producers for exclusively airing the single on a rival station. Bonniwell would pen much more experimental compositions, but the dispute damaged The Music Machine’s prospects for another charting hit.

Information related to the band :

“Wikipedia”

The nucleus of the band was formed when Sean Bonniwell (lead vocals, rhythm guitar) took part in a jam session with Keith Olsen (bass guitar) and Ron Edgar (drums; born Ronald Edgar on June 25, 1946 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) – both of whom he met in the folk music circuit. Bonniwell, already a practiced “folky,” possessed prior experience as a vocalist with the Wayfarers. The traditional folk combo had already enjoyed some regional success: releasing three albums, and building on the experience of Bonniwell who insisted on the importance of rehearsal. As Bonniwell traveled and recorded with the group, he began penning some material that would later surface with the Music Machine. However, still influenced by acts now considered passé, the Wayfarers’ musical conservatism became stifling to Bonniwell who wanted to explore the type of harder, cutting-edge stylistic possibilities that he eventually would find in rock. Prior to meeting, Olsen had previously performed in Gale Garnett’s backing band, and Edgar was a member of a bohemian folk quintet called the GoldeBriars. With the GoldeBriars, Edgar contributed to their unreleased third album that was originally intended for distribution on Epic Records, but the group disbanded before it could be released.

In 1965, the three formed their own folk rock group, the Raggamuffins, and began performing in Los Angeles with a repertoire that saw the band embrace a more unorthodox style, and depart from their traditional roots. The group also recorded four songs that went unreleased until the 2000 album, Ignition, which represented the transitional phase before the band developed into the Music Machine. Bonniwell and Olsen were enthusiastically experimenting with musical textures while the band arranged strict rehearsal regimens in Bonniwell’s garage. The Raggamuffins purchased hardware for a homemade fuzz-tone switch. From the onset Bonniwell ensured the group resonated like no other by instructing his bandmates to lower their instruments from the standard E note to D-flat.  As a result of the adjustment, the Raggamuffins were given a bottom-heavy and ominous sound. In addition, the group began dressing noire, while sporting dyed-black hair, and the trademark single leather glove that presented an eye-catching and unified band image, which would later become influential with certain 1970s punk acts. 

Auditions were held in early 1966 to expand the group, resulting in the recruitment of Mark Landon (lead guitar) and Doug Rhodes (organ), previously a session musician for the Association. To reflect on the revamped line-up, Bonniwell changed the band’s name to the Music Machine. Another purpose for coining the name, Bonniwell explained, was “I seguewayed [sic] all the original material with musical segueways [sic]. So we would be on stage for like an hour and ten minutes, wall-to-wall music just nonstop, which is why I called us the Music Machine”.  The band built a name for itself with its performances in local clubs in Los Angeles. With Bonniwell as the de facto leader and creative force of the band, the Music Machine began to develop a blend of gritty 60s punk and psychedelia, and a repertoire encompassing Bonniwell’s self-penned material along with some cover songs. The band’s sound was highlighted by the authoritative and versatile vocals provided by Bonniwell, with an energized technique that juxtaposed the styles of Mick Jagger and Sky Saxon. Unlike these two contemporaries, Bonniwell possessed unusually good intonation in long-sustained passages, and the ability to breakdown phrases into a series of slow pulsations. The Music Machine’s artistic stance was also highlighted by Landon’s wiry guitar playing, Olsen’s reverberant bass, and Edgar’s cymbal-punctuated drumming, which gave the band a harder-edged sound than many of their contemporaries. 

Commercial success (1966–1967) 

Record producer Brian Ross just happened upon the Music Machine at Hollywood Legion Lanes, a bowling alley that was an early stomping ground for the group, and signed them to a recording contract with Original Sound. On July 30, 1966, the band entered RCA Studios in Los Angeles to record the Bonniwell originals “Talk Talk” and “Come on In”, which was initially going to be the A-side for the group’s debut single. Bonniwell had composed “Talk Talk” a year prior to forming the band, and the studio time was marked by the Music Machine’s collective input aimed toward tightening the structure of its arrangements, including the two-note fuzz guitar riffs and Edgar’s precise drumming technique. By virtue of the group’s dedication to rehearsal, recording sessions concluded with the Music Machine requiring only three takes to complete the two songs. Though the band was satisfied with the acetate to “Come on In”, the members were convinced “Talk Talk” would propel them into the national charts. 

“Talk Talk” was released on September 10, 1966, on Original Sound, and rose to number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also peaked at number 21 on Cashbox and number 18 on Record WorldThe song’s relatively short time-length—a mere one minute and 56 seconds—made “Talk Talk” a favorable staple on Top 40 radio and its competing underground FM stations. The Music Machine’s hit was arguably the most radical single to appear on mainstream broadcasting in 1966, the phenomenon described by music historian Richie Unterberger as a “rally cry to social alienation with a mixture of sarcasm, rebellion, self-pity, and paranoia”. Indeed, Bonniwell’s progressive lyrics and arrangements have been credited with influencing the Doors and Iron Butterfly, as well as future punk bands. After the single’s release, the Music Machine embarked on a grueling three-month tour across the U.S., packaged with the Beach Boys, Question Mark and the Mysterians, and Clyde McPhatter. It concluded with the group receiving a poor response from the more conservative southern crowds, who criticized the band’s black outfits.  Nonetheless, for the most part, their unified image served well for the Music Machine’s national recognition, especially as the group made numerous appearances on the television programs Where the Action IsAmerican Bandstand, and Shindig!.

After their long national tour, the Music Machine returned to the studio to record their debut album, (Turn On) The Music Machine. Much to the disapproval of Bonniwell, his original material had to compete with dispensable cover versions of “Cherry, Cherry”, “Taxman”, “See See Rider”, and “96 Tears”, all chosen by their record label with an expectation that the well-known songs would increase record sales. One interpretation voluntarily selected by the band was a slow, moody, fuzz-laden arrangement of “Hey Joe” which bears a strong resemblance to Jimi Hendrix’s later version. Bonniwell first heard the folk standard in 1962 at a club in Hermosa Beach, and was convinced the tune’s tempo was too fast, as he unsuccessfully attempted to persuade the Wayfarers to record a slower version. He revisited the concept with altered lyrics after hearing Tim Rose’s regionally successful rendition in early 1966.  The throaty vocals, most evidently on “Hey Joe”, Bonniwell blames on recording “the Turn On album after a 30-day tour. Mark’s fingers were literally bleeding. I could hardly even speak, much less sing”. Despite the album’s shortcomings, (Turn On) The Music Machine managed to reach number 75 on the Billboard 200.  On January 21, 1967, a song taken from the album, “The People in Me”, was issued as the group’s second single but stalled at number 66 nationally after the band’s management angered radio executives for initially making the song exclusively available to a rival station. 

The Bonniwell Music Machine (1967–1969)

Immediately after (Turn On) The Music Machine was released, the band left for another U.S. tour, despite pleas by the group to arrange an appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival. In the small off-periods in their hard-pressed schedule, the Music Machine demoed a new batch of Bonniwell originals at RCA Studios in New York City and Cosimo Matassa’s facility in New Orleans, before polishing the tunes back in Los Angeles. From the sessions emerged the group’s third single “Double Yellow Line”, which was released in April 1967, and bubbled under the Billboard Hot 100 at number 111. The subsequent release, “Eagle Never Hunts the Fly” failed to chart, but is often described as Bonniwell’s tour de force—a tune Ross praised as “sonically compelling works and a lot to listen to, for the time. It was the kind of thing you just didn’t hear, you almost worried about getting those sounds onto a 45”. 

In May 1967, the original lineup recorded together for the final time, completing “Astrologically Incompatible”, “Talk Me Down”, and “The Day Today”. One problem that led to the band’s first breakup was the Music Machine name was actually owned by Ross, as a part of their production deal, awarding the group with little to no royalties. Leaving Bonniwell to carry on the project, Olsen, Edgar, and Rhodes went on to join the Millennium, a sunshine pop group conceived by singer-songwriter Curt Boettcher and Olsen. The Millennium recorded the album Begin in 1968 before disbanding. The three former members also took part in Boettcher’s next production, the studio group Sagittarius, releasing Present Tense, coupled with the moderately successful single “My World Fell Down”, before Edgar and Rhodes departed. Olsen stayed on board to record Sagittarius’ second album, The Blue Marble, and subsequently forged a successful career as a record producer in the 1970s. 

Undeterred, Bonniwell successfully negotiated his recording contract with Original Sound be transferred to Warner Bros. Records, in hopes of finding a greater degree of independence. The Music Machine’s spell with Original Sound was drawing to a conclusion, though the company did release “Hey Joe” as a single in 1968 in an attempt to cash in on Hendrix’s success with the song. There was also the Bonniwell solo project in association with producer Paul Buff that resulted in the rare “Nothing Is Too Good for My Car” single being put out under the name the Friendly Torpedoes. Writer Greg Russo, who composed the liner notes for the single’s remastered release, explains the side-project was initiated during a confusing transitional phase for Bonniwell that also generated the tune “Citizen Fear”, which did not receive distribution until the Ignition album in 2000. Free from company pressure, Bonniwell formed a new band, rechristened The Bonniwell Music Machine, with session musicians Ed Jones on bass guitar, Harry Garfield on organ, Alan Wisdom on lead guitar, and Jerry Harris on drums.

In March 1967, Bonniwell and Ross ushered in the new lineup at United Western Recorders to record the second album The Bonniwell Music MachineThe recording and mixing process was painstakingly masterminded almost solely by Bonniwell, who was appreciative of his new bandmates’ efforts to develop the album’s concept, but disillusioned by the project’s lack of cohesion.  He further explains that the “Warner Brothers album has such an eclectic approach; each track is (was) a singular, studio invention. Not only was my songwriting divergent, but my approach to recording was exploratory as well”. Six of the album’s tracks were holdovers from the first lineup’s sessions at Cosimo Matassa’s studio and RCA Studios. This resulted in a hodgepodge of musical styles, including exploratory approaches toward psychedelia and soft rock. On February 10, 1968, The Bonniwell Music Machine was released with little commercial success. Conseqently, the Bonniwell Music Machine was largely forgotten by the general public and the second lineup fragmented in July 1968.

Disbandment and aftermath

One final version of the Bonniwell Music Machine was assembled with a revolving door of musicians. Two more singles were released on the Warner Bros. label with little notice, before “Advice and Consent”, the group’s final single, was distributed on Bell Records in March 1969. Disenchanted by the music industry and having to tour against imitation Music Machine groups, Bonniwell gave up the rights to the band’s name and signed on to Capitol Records as a solo artist. Under the name T.S. Bonniwell, he recorded the album Close, which saw a poetically-inclined Bonniwell explore string and orchestral arrangements. Following the album’s release, Bonniwell departed on what he called his “westernized guru era”—studying eastern mysticism and practicing meditation and vegetarianism.

The band was all but forgotten after their dissolution, but the Music Machine and their music experienced a revival of interest in the late-1980s. It began with Rhino Records featuring tracks on the Nuggets compilation albums Nuggets Volume 1: The Hits and Nuggets, Volume 2: Punk, before releasing the album The Best of the Music Machine in 1984. Other compilations such as Beyond the GarageThe Very Best of the Music Machine, and Ignition have added to the Music Machine’s return to the public’s interest. In addition, “Talk Talk” and “Double Yellow Line” appear on the 1998 expanded box-set of Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965–1968

In 2000, Bonniwell published his autobiography Beyond the Garage, which recalled his experiences with the Music Machine and his life after the group’s disbandment. Aside from a few live performances with the Larksmen and a guest appearance on their 2006 album, Bonniwell never returned to an active music career, though he claimed to have penned over 300 songs after his tenure with the Music Machine. On December 20, 2011, Bonniwell died of lung cancer at a medical center in Visalia, California; he was 71 years old. Drummer Ronald “Ron” Edgar died on February 23, 2015 at the age of 68.

Discography

Studio albums

  • (Turn On) The Music Machine (1966)
  • The Bonniwell Music Machine (1968)

Extended plays

  • Talk Talk (1967)

Compilation albums

  • The Best of the Music Machine (1984)
  • The Music Machine (1994)
  • Beyond the Garage (1995)
  • Rock ‘n’ Roll Hits (1997)
  • Turn On: The Best of the Music Machine (1999)
  • Ignition (2000)
  • The Ultimate Turn On (2006)
  • Rarities, Vol. 1: Last Singles & Demos (2014)
  • Rarities, Vol. 2: Early Mixes & Rehearsals (2014)
  • Re-Ignition (2015)

Singles

  • “Talk Talk” b/w “Come on In” (1966)
  • “The People in Me” b/w “Masculine Intuition” (1967)
  • “Double Yellow Line” b/w “Absolutely Positively” (1967)
  • “The Eagle Never Hunts the Fly” b/w “I’ve Loved You” (1967)
  • “Hey Joe” b/w “Taxman” (1967)
  • “Advise and Consent” b/w “Mother Nature, Father Earth” (1969)

As The Bonniwell Music Machine

  • “Bottom of the Soul” b/w “Astrologically Incompatible” (1967)
  • “Me, Myself and I” b/w “Soul Love” (1968)
  • “Tin Can Beach” b/w “Time Out for a Daydream” (1968)
  • “You’ll Love Me Again” b/w “To the Light” (1968)
  • “Point of No Return” b/w “King Mixer” (1997)

Other

  • “Nothing’s Too Good for My Car” b/w “So Long Ago” (1968, as the Friendly Torpedos)

Photos related to the track :

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Single photo (A’ Side)

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The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Album cover photo (front)

THE MUSIC MACHINE TURN ON 1 (2).jpg

Photos related to the band :

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Links related to the track :

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Links related to the band :

The Music Machine Interview with Doug Rhodes on “Craig Morrison” Website

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Discogs”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Mark Prindle” Website

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Google Play”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Music Machine – “The Ultimate Turn On” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

 

 

 

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change”

John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

John Mayall (Macclesfield, Cheshire, U.K.)

“Track”

“The Laws Must Change” (written by John Mayall) A1 track (opening track) included on the live album “Turning Point”

Album :

“Turning Point”  released on Polydor Records (583571) in October 1969

The Turning Point is a live album by John Mayall, featuring British blues music recorded at a concert at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East on 12 July 1969.

Originally released with a lyric insert.

The album was produced by John Mayall, who also designed the packaging and was the album’s art director. The recording engineer was Eddie Kramer, who had engineered Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, among others.

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

John Almond – flute, saxophone, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, mouth percussion

Jon Mark – acoustic guitar

John Mayall – guitar, harmonica, keyboards, tambourine, vocals, slide guitar, mouth percussion

Steve Thompson – bass guitar

The performers on the album were Mayall on vocals, harmonica, a slide and a Fender Telecaster guitar, a tambourine, and mouth percussion, Jon Mark on acoustic guitar, Steve Thompson on bass, and Johnny Almond on tenor and alto saxophones, flutes, and mouth percussion. All the songs on the album were written or co-written by John Mayall. Thompson co-wrote CaliforniaThoughts About Roxanne and Don’t Waste My Time.Another track, “I’m Gonna Fight For You, J.B.,” is a tribute to the American blues guitarist J. B. Lenoir who died in 1967 and who had a deep influence on Mayall (this was Mayall’s second such tribute to the musician; “The Death of J.B. Lenoir” appeared on his earlier Crusade album). Two concerts took place, on 11 and 12 July. All tracks are from the second gig.

Credits :

Bob Gordon – photography

Suha Gur – mastering

Eddie Kramer – engineer, audio engineer

Bill Levenson – reissue producer

John Mayall – liner notes, artwork, art direction, design, photography, audio production, telecaster

Monique McGuffin – production coordination

Neil Slaven – liner notes

Tapani Tapanainen – photography

Larry La Fond – photography

Chris Welch – liner notes

Barry Wentzell – photography

Zill – photography

Companies : 

Manufactured By – Polydor Records Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Polydor Ltd.

Made By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Published By – St. George Music

Recorded At – Fillmore East

Lacquer Cut At – Phonodisc Ltd.

Label: Made in England, St. George Music, ® 1969

Track-list :

01. The Laws Must Change – 7:21
02. Saw Mill Gulch Road – 4:39
03. I’m Gonna Fight For You J.B. – 5:27
04. So Hard To Share – 7:05
05. California – 9:30
06. Thoughts About Roxanne  – 8:20
07. Room To Move – 5:03

Bonus tracks (2001 reissue) :

  1. “Sleeping By Her Side” – 5.10
  2. “Don’t Waste My Time” (Mayall, Thompson) – 4.54
  3. “Can’t Sleep This Night” – 6.19

JOHN MAYALL TRACKLIST 1 (2)

Lyrics :

The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
But while the law is standing
You gotta open up your minds
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
But you gotta see both sides
You’ll find yourself in jail ‘fore long
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they’re only doin’ a gig
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they are only doin’ a gig
Gotta try and take the time
To figure out how the issue got that big
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Don’t throw rocks at policemen
But get the knots of law untied
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
The laws must change one day
But it’s goin’ to take some time
Songwriters: John Mayall
Information related to the album/artist/track :
“All Music”
As the elder statesman of British blues, it is John Mayall’s lot to be more renowned as a bandleader and mentor than as a performer in his own right. Throughout the ’60s, his band the Bluesbreakers acted as a finishing school for the leading British blues-rock musicians of the era. Guitarists Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor joined his band in a remarkable succession in the mid-’60s, honing their chops with Mayall before going on to join Cream, Fleetwood Mac, and the Rolling Stones, respectively. John McVie and Mick Fleetwood, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser (of Free), John Almond, and Jon Mark also played and recorded with Mayall for varying lengths of times in the ’60s.

Mayall’s personnel has tended to overshadow his own considerable abilities. The multi-instrumentalist was adept in bringing out the best in his younger charges (Mayall was in his thirties by the time the Bluesbreakers began to make a name for themselves). Doing his best to provide a context in which they could play Chicago-style electric blues, Mayall was never complacent, writing most of his own material revamping his lineup with unnerving regularity, and constantly experimenting and stretching with the basic blues form on groundbreaking recordings such as 1967’s The Blues Alone, on which he played all instruments save for percussion — provided by Keef Hartley — and 1969’s best-selling The Turning Point, a stellar, drum-less unplugged helping of acoustic blues that netted him his biggest hit, the single “Room to Move.” Likewise, 1972’s Jazz Blues Fusion moved the other direction, as it featured Mayall in the company of trumpeter Blue Mitchell, saxophonist Clifford Solomon, guitarist Freddy Robinson, and bassist Larry Taylor. Mayall’s output has been prolific. He has introduced dozens of instrumentalists to the music-listening public including guitarists Coco Montoya and Harvey Mandel, and violinist Don “Sugarcane” Harris. When Clapton joined the Bluesbreakers in 1965, Mayall had already been recording for a year, and performing professionally long before that. Originally based in Manchester, Mayall moved to London in 1963 on the advice of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, who thought a living could be made playing the blues in the bigger city. Tracing a path through his various lineups of the ’60s is a daunting task. At least 15 different editions of the Bluesbreakers were in existence from January 1963 through mid-1970. Some notable musicians (like guitarist Davy Graham, Mick Fleetwood, and Jack Bruce) passed through for little more than a cup of coffee; Mayall’s longest-running employee, bassist John McVie, lasted about four years. The Bluesbreakers, like Fairport Convention or the Fall, were more a concept than an ongoing core. Mayall, too, had the reputation of being a difficult and demanding employer, willing to give musicians their walking papers as his music evolved, although he also imparted invaluable schooling to them while the associations lasted.Mayall recorded his debut single in early 1964; he made his first album, a live affair, near the end of the year. At this point the Bluesbreakers had a more pronounced R&B influence than would be exhibited on their most famous recordings, somewhat in the mold of younger combos like the Animals and Rolling Stones, but the Bluesbreakers would take a turn for the purer with the recruitment of Eric Clapton in the spring of 1965. Clapton had left the Yardbirds in order to play straight blues, and the Bluesbreakers allowed him that freedom (or stuck to well-defined restrictions, depending upon your viewpoint). Clapton began to inspire reverent acclaim as one of Britain’s top virtuosos, as reflected in the famous “Clapton is God” graffiti that appeared in London in the mid-’60s.

In professional terms, though, 1965 wasn’t the best of times for the group, which had been dropped by Decca. Clapton even left the group for a few months for an odd trip to Greece, leaving Mayall to straggle on with various fill-ins, including Peter Green. Clapton did return in late 1965, around the time an excellent blues-rock single, “I’m Your Witchdoctor” (with searing sustain-laden guitar riffs), was issued on Immediate. By early 1966, the band was back on Decca, and recorded its landmark Bluesbreakers LP. This was the album that, with its clean, loud, authoritative licks, firmly established Clapton as a guitar hero, on both reverent covers of tunes by the likes of Otis Rush and Freddie King and decent originals by Mayall himself. The record was also an unexpected commercial success, making the Top Ten in Britain. From that point on, in fact, Mayall became one of the first rock musicians to depend primarily upon the LP market; he recorded plenty of singles throughout the ’60s, but none of them came close to becoming a hit.

Clapton left the Bluesbreakers in mid-1966 to form Cream with Jack Bruce, who had played with Mayall briefly in late 1965. Mayall turned quickly to Peter Green, who managed the difficult feat of stepping into Clapton’s shoes and gaining respect as a player of roughly equal imagination and virtuosity, although his style was quite distinctly his own. Green recorded one LP with Mayall, A Hard Road, and several singles, sometimes writing material and taking some respectable lead vocals. Green’s talents, like those of Clapton, were too large to be confined by sideman status, and in mid-1967 he left to form a successful band of his own, Fleetwood Mac.

Mayall then enlisted 19-year-old Mick Taylor; remarkably, despite the consecutive departures of two star guitarists, Mayall maintained a high level of popularity. The late ’60s were also a time of considerable experimentation for the Bluesbreakers, who moved into a form of blues-jazz-rock fusion with the addition of a horn section, and then retreated into mellower, acoustic-oriented music. Mick Taylor, the last of the famous triumvirate of Mayall-bred guitar heroes, left in mid-1969 to join the Rolling Stones. Yet in a way Mayall was thriving more than ever, as the U.S. market, which had been barely aware of him in the Clapton era, was beginning to open up for his music. In fact, at the end of the ’60s, Mayall moved to Los Angeles. Released in 1969, The Turning Point, a live, all-acoustic affair, was a commercial and artistic high point.

In America at least, Mayall continued to be pretty popular in the early ’70s. His band was as unstable as ever; at various points some American musicians flitted in and out of the Bluesbreakers, including Harvey Mandel, Canned Heatbassist Larry Taylor, and Don “Sugarcane” Harris. Although he’s released numerous albums since, and remains a prodigiously busy and reasonably popular live act, his post-1970 output generally hasn’t matched the quality of his ’60s work. Following collaborations with an unholy number of guest celebrities, in the early ’80s he re-teamed with a couple of his more renowned vets, John McVie and Mick Taylor, for a tour, which was chronicled by Great American Music’s Blues Express, released in 2010. The ’60s albums are what you want, though over the past decades, there’s little doubt that Mayall has done a great deal to popularize the blues all over the globe. Continuing to record and tour into his eighties, Mayall released A Special Life, recorded at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood and featuring a guest spot by singer and accordion player C.J. Chenier, in 2014. The album was universally celebrated as one of his best.

A live archival recording of the Green, McVie, Fleetwood-era Bluesbreakers was released in April as Live in 1967. Meanwhile, the bandleader, his co-producer Eric Corne, and his seven-year old group — Rocky Athas, guitar; Greg Rzab, bass; Jay Davenport, drums — were in the studio. They emerged with Find a Way to Care, a set that showcased Mayall’s highly underrated keyboard playing on a set of originals and vintage covers including Percy Mayfield’s “The River’s Invitation.” The album was released in the late summer of 2015. Talk About That, Mayall’s second album for Forty Below, arrived in late 2017.

In the spring of 2018, at the age of 85, Mayall had to cancel a U.S. tour due to a nasty bout with pneumonia. That summer, sufficiently recovered, he hit the recording studio and emerged with the full-length Nobody Told Me in the late fall. Its first single, “Distant Lonesome Train,” was co-written with Joe Bonamassa (who also played guitar on it and another track). Other guests included Steve Van Zandt, Todd Rundgren, Alex Lifeson, Larry McCray, and Carolyn Wonderland. Mayall, ever the road warrior, embarked on a world tour after the album’s release that continued into 2019.

Photos related to the album/track :

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album cover photo (front)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album photo (A’ Side)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo 

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JOHN MAYALL 2 (2)

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JOHN MAYALL 1 (2)

John Mayall Recording Saturday Cub at the BBC Theater 1969, Mini Poster

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