Ambient, Electronic, Fusion, Jazz Rock, Krautrock, Minimal, New Age, World Music, Multinational, 1970s (Tracks) Between – “Samum”

Between – “Samum” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Ambient/Electronic/Fusion/Jazz Rock/Krautrock/Minimal/New Age/World Music Multinational 1970s (Tracks) 

Band :

Between (Multinational, Argentina, Germany, U.S.A.) based in München, Bayern, Germany

Also known as :

Between the Chairs, Gruppe Between

Track :

“Samum” (written by Roberto Détrée, Peter Michael Hamer) B3 track (closing track) included on the album “And The Waters Opened” 

Album :

“And The Waters Opened”  released on Vertigo Records ( 6360 612) in 1973

Image result for between and the waters opened

Between – “And The Waters Opened”  Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Between – “And The Waters Opened”  Full Album Video on YouTube

Line-up/Credits :

Roberto Détrée / guitar, cello, harp
Peter Michael Hamel / keyboards, vocals
Robert Eliscu / oboe, oboe d’Amore
Cottrell Black / percussion

With:
Duru Omson / bamboo flute, percussion & voice (1,5,6)
Walter Bachauer (“Fabian Arkas”) / electronics (3)

Cover [Cover Design] – Guntram Holdgrün

Producer, Engineer – Ulrich Kraus

Track-List :

1. And The Waters Opened (10:51)
2. Uroboros (5:33)
3. Syn (5:52)
4. Devotion (3:43)
5. Happy Stage (11:14)
6. Samum (5:36)

Total Time: 42:49

Bonus tracks on 2006 remaster:
1. Journey To The Ixtland (4:30)

8. Kalenda Maya (3:01)
9. Former Times (2:20)

Tracks 1, 8 & 9 are previously unreleased bonus tracks, recorded April 4 1976
Eine Produktion des Bayerischen Rundfunks

Information about the album/band/track :

Founded in Munich, Germany in 1970 (as Between The Chairs) – Ceased activity around 1980

Peter Michael Hamel founded Between, an international band specialised in improvisational / « ethnic » rock music. The name Between comes from the fact that Hamel’s music is originaly “in-between”, always making a combination between “popular music” and “serious music”. The classical musician Robert Eliscu (born American), responsible of oboe parts in POPOL VUH can be considered as the major member of the musical tribe next to Peter Michael Hamel. With a small community of six members, BETWEEN recorded its first album “Einstieg” in 1971. It directly announces the musical orientation to come, timeless ethnic rock compositions, mixing together several acoustic instruments (bongo, flute.) to folk and jazz. “And the waters openened” recorded in 1973 carries on improvisations and acoustic exploration, played in a rather “spacey” rock atmosphere, sometimes closed to krautrock, weird flavour. “Dharana” (1974) is seen as a classic album and marks a new step in the launch of “world” music. It contains long epic, acoustic pieces with a few minimalist, oriental accents. “Hesse Between Music” (1975) is a concept album, always improvised, featuring Indian scales and recitation. During and after BETWEEN’s career, the front man Peter Michael Hamel has developed the possibilities of spiritual effects of music on mind thanks to a great variety of solo albums in search of East meets West.

Between was named Between because the music they made was sitting between the chairs back then and was reaching far beyond genre borders or the traditional segregation of E- and U-Musik (E for “ernst” / serious, U für “unterhaltende” / entertaining). This difference may be still alive in some highbrow dinosaur’s brain and was (sometimes still is) made to separate the so called popular (i.e. proletarian) from the bourgeois culture. Alas, today’s situation is more comfortable (and difficult to a certain extend). But, this is a review for a record not a sociology seminar talking Bourdieu’s “Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste” or something like that. (But, well, while I’m at it: go read it, it’s worth it!)

So, Between was Peter Michael Hamel’s brainchild who is a German composer and music theorist (whose records are all great!). Born out of friendship with a few international friends who had a background either in classical or pop music (to stress that distinction again). “And The Waters Opened” was their second record, released in 1973 and it’s heavily influenced by the music of Carl Orff. (Listen to Robert Eliscu’s oboe – which can also be heard on a lot of Popol Vuh records –and if you’re familiar with some of Orff’s music you’ll be reminded instantly). Another reference to how Between sounds may be found in Bobby Beausoleil’s Orkustra which also can be seen as sort of a synthesis between a symphonic orchestra and a psychedelic band.

But even though Between is about overcoming musical (and also social borders) the music is far from freak-out jams. Between is not about provoking utter chaos – Between is about reaching out for a universal harmony in the act of making music. It is – to a certain extend – a sonic utopia.

There are parts of the music that are improvised but most of it was written down before and is executed with modest but nonetheless masterful musicianship. The compositions take cues from the aforementioned Carl Orff, but also from Indian Classical Music, from the Spiritual Jazz and some of the Minimal Music that was around at that time and of course there’s a good portion of Psychedelia thrown in. Every second recorded sounds organic and you can bet that a lot of thought was put into it. And it is in fact a certain compositional rigour that prevents the music from becoming world-music-kitsch or pointless fusion-music: The music you hear is not just about the intended harmony – the music IS the realization of that harmony.

So, you don’t trust me, you think I’m exaggerating here? No problem, get some Between and trust your ears! Be it the wonderful title track or the following “Uroboros” or be it one of the other compositions: this is joyful and refreshing music. The instrumentation’s colourful and the general vibe is uplifting and –well, yeah – it’s just great to have some music around that is full of positive energy without being besmirched with esoteric blurb. It makes you feel good without having to leave your mind at home! A great achievement, if you ask me.

Photos about the album/band/track ;

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Album cover photo (front)

Image result for between and the waters opened

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Album  photo

Image result for between and the waters opened

Links about the album/band/track :

Between Band’s Page on Discogs

Between Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Between Band’s Page on Spotify

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Full Album Download Link on Juno Download

 

 

 

Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Cressida – “To Play Your Little Game”

Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) 

Cressida (London, U.K.) Symphonic Progressive Rock Band

The band’s name was taken from William Shakespeare’s play titled “Troilus and Cressida”

Troilus and Cressida (/ˈtrɔɪləs … ˈkrɛsɪdə/) is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1602. It was described by Frederick S. Boas as one of Shakespeare’s problem plays. The play ends on a very bleak note with the death of the noble Trojan Hector and destruction of the love between Troilus and Cressida. The work has in recent years “stimulated exceptionally lively critical debate”.

Throughout the play, the tone lurches wildly between bawdy comedy and tragic gloom, and readers and theatre-goers have frequently found it difficult to understand how one is meant to respond to the characters. Several characteristic elements of the play (the most notable being its constant questioning of intrinsic values such as hierarchy, honour and love) have often been viewed as distinctly “modern”, as in the following remarks on the play by author and literary scholar Joyce Carol Oates:

Troilus and Cressida, that most vexing and ambiguous of Shakespeare’s plays, strikes the modern reader as a contemporary document – its investigation of numerous infidelities, its criticism of tragic pretensions, above all, its implicit debate between what is essential in human life and what is only existential are themes of the twentieth century. … This is tragedy of a special sort – the “tragedy” the basis of which is the impossibility of conventional tragedy.

“To Play Your Little Game” (written by Cressida) A1 track (opening track) included on the album ” Cressida” 

Released on Vertigo Records (VO 7) in 1970

Released on a ”swirl” Vertigo label in a fold-out cover. Swirl inner sleeve.
A Philips Record Product.

Related Artists :
Black Widow, Dominators, Four Degrees, Mustard, The Original London Beat, The Peasants, Ivan Sinclair & The System Soul Band, The Syndicate, Tranquility, Uriah Heep, Geno Washington & the Ram Jam Band, White Rabbit.
Also known as :
Charge [1968]

Line-up/Credits :

Angus Cullen / vocals
John Heyworth / guitar, lead vocals on track 5
Peter Jennings / harpsichord, organ, piano
Kevin McCarthy / bass
Iain Clark / drums

Design [Cover] – Teenburger

Engineer – Robin Thompson

Producer – Ossie Byrne

Track-List :

1. To Play Your Little Game (3:15)
2. Winter is Coming Again (4:42)
3. Time For Bed (2:18)
4. Cressida (3:57)
5. Home And Where I Long To Be (4:04)
6. Depression (5:02)
7. One Of A Group (3:35)
8. Lights In My Mind (2:45)
9. The Only Earthman In Town (3:32)
10. Spring ’69 (2:14)
11. Down Down (4:15)
12. Tomorrow Is A Whole New Day (5:19)

Lyrics :

I face the wall, I can’t recall
That knowing you, I must confess I’ll lose my mind
Should I remember you
No room for talk, I’ll take a walk
To free the wheels, I’ll check my list of friendly faces
The answers must be sought

Now I’ll have to face the fact
Soon I’ll realize
I’ll turn around, turn around
To play your little game
Now I’ll have to face the fact
Soon I’ll realize
I’ll turn around, turn around
To play your little game

I thought I heard the answer then
Among lament, I turn around
But then you’re gone
Julie was my friend
I face the wall, I can’t recall
That knowing you, I must confess I’ll lose my mind
Should I remember you

Now I’ll have to face the fact
Soon I’ll realize
I’ll turn around, turn around
To play your little game
Now I’ll have to face the fact
Soon I’ll realize
I’ll turn around, turn around
To play your little game

Cressida was a British art rock band formed at the tail-end of the 1960s in the shadow of (and their music very much in thrall to) the Moody Blues, with a heavy organ and Mellotron sound courtesy of keyboard player Peter Jennings. The original lineup of Jennings, Angus Cullen (vocals, guitar), John Heyworth (guitar), Kevin McCarthy (bass), and Ian Clark(drums) was signed to Polydor’s progressive rock imprint, Vertigo Records. The group had a dense, lyrical sound, and Cullen’s singing was of a pleasing, almost pop nature, in a vein similar to Justin Hayward, Paul McCartney, et al. Their self-titled debut album was filled with hauntingly beautiful melodies and relatively accessible, straightforward song structures. It was somewhat derivative of antecedents such as the Moody Blues, but it did well enough to justify a follow-up in 1971. Heyworthhad departed by the time of the second album, entitled Asylum, replaced by John Culley and Paul Martin Layton (of the New Seekers) on guitar, and with Harold McNair added on flute as well. That album, produced by Ossie Byrne, was more ambitious instrumentally and, surprisingly, given Byrne’s previous work with the Bee Gees and Eclection, less focused on Cullen’s vocals. By 1972, however, the group had run out of steam and recording contract, and they never really had a chance to develop a history. Ian Clark moved on to a brief stay with Uriah Heep and John Culley became a member of Black Widow.

In the great lottery of pop, a question that frequently has to be asked is why one group and not another? Why are groups such as The Moody Blues, King Crimson and even dear old Gentle Giant venerated, while equally lyrically and musically powerful bands such as Cressida are left, discarded as the forlorn dummies heads on the beach on the cover of Asylum? It is a hard question to answer at the best of times and even harder when you reacquaint yourself with the group’s small but perfectly formed oeuvre.

By 1969, the decade-and-a-half-old form of rock and roll was clearly here to stay. The music had already traveled from the 2:30 jangle about love into song cycles, heavy riffing and, thanks to the proliferation of psychedelic substances, a new mysticism. Summers of love had been and gone and even places like Beckenham in Kent were having free festivals. A man had landed on the moon and on record, the cosmos was the limit. With their name taken from Greek mythology – the daughter of soothsayer Calchas, Cressida betrayed her eternal love Troilus, of whom Shakespeare wrote so eloquently – the group are one of those glorious footnotes that make progressive rock so very interesting.

There may be few today who can recall the power and the glory of Cressida, but the music they offered during the brief sliver of a recording career is truly more than ripe for reappraisal. The group was formed in the late 60s by keyboard and mellotron player, Peter Jennings. Adding Angus Cullen on vocals and guitar, John Heyworth on guitar, Kevin McCarthy on bass and lain Clark on drums, the group gained a reputation as a fierce live act, their music full of delicate passages and interludes of storming complexity. With Cullen’s sweet, lyrical voice and an obvious nod to The Moody Blues, Cressida became one of the first signings to Vertigo, the recently-founded progressive rock offshoot of Polydor records.

Vertigo were very much in the mould of forward-thinking new record labels, well away from the suited and stuffy mainstream. With an almost arbitrary A&R policy (Patrick Campbell Lyons from the original Nirvana scouted for the label for a while), Vertigo sought to release music by acts that reflected the Zeitgeist perfectly. All with that incredible spiral logo revolving on the label: if the music didn’t blow your mind, then the graphics certainly would. So, after releases by Colosseum, Juicy Lucy, Manfred Mann, Rod Stewart and Black Sabbath, Cressida’s eponymous debut album, (VO 7) became the seventh release on Vertigo.

Released on the imprint’s legendary spiral label in 1970, it was produced by Ossie Byrne and engineered by Robin Thompson. Byrne had previously worked with The Bee Gees and brought some of the economic simplicity of their early productions to the recordings. Its taut, prog-pop melodies won the band a small and fervent following. With tinges of blues and classical in this pungent mix, the album, although evoking King Crimson, Paul McCartney and The Moody Blues, was clearly a highly individual piece of work. From the opening pop rush of To Play Your Little Game to the great, upbeat closer, Tomorrow Is A Whole New Day, Cressida was a much-loved album for those in the know.

The deft touch and George Harrison-esque soloing of Winter Is Coming Again would have made a great pop single. Time For Bed was a whimsical jazz take on Zebedee’s then-contemporaneous catchphrase. Although not a huge commercial success, the release slotted in perfectly with Vertigo’s ethos, and Cressida were to given the green light to a return to the studio. But not, of course, without a few obligatory personnel changes. This was early 70s rock, after all. Guitarist John Heyworth departed in 1971, and was replaced by John Culley and New Seeker member Paul Martin Layton.

Their second album, Asylum (Vertigo 6360 025) released later that year, was a different beast altogether. The album was a denser, darker affair, relying less on Cullen’s vocals. Ex- Donovan, Ginger Baker’s Airforce and John Martyn reedsman Harold McNair played on the album, adding to its deeper, lilting feel than its predecessor, which focused more on instrumental passages and elaborate arrangements. The subject matter was also far less mystical than their contemporaries.

Munich (or to give it its full title, Munich 1938; Appeasement Was The Cry, Munich 1970; Mine To Do Or Die) is tremendous fun: with its subtle organ parts and great dual lead guitar as well, it can be seen as the group at their very zenith. Again produced by Byrne, Asylum featured orchestration and musical direction from Graeme Hall – who had recently also worked with Shadows offshoot Marvin, Welch & Farrar. The album remains the jewel in their crown Changes were afoot at Vertigo, and by late 1971, the group found themselves without a contract. Quietly, like so many of the era, they split up.

Drummer lain Clark went on to play with Uriah Heep for a year and John Culley became a member of another lamented prog act, Black Widow. Paul Layton returned to simpler pastures with the New Seekers and the special guest who had so enlivened the instrumentation on Asylum, Harold McNair, was to die tragically from cancer in 1971. Little has been heard from the others since. The Vertigo label, ironically, was reactivated by Universal in 2003 for bands such as The Rapture.

One of the coolest items that autumn was a skinny-fit Vertigo T-shirt with the spiral logo on it, worn by people who had little idea of the imprint’s illustrious history. So, what goes around spirals around, and here we have the opportunity to revisit both of Cressida’s albums, possession of which have long been an insider sign to the cognoscenti. A small, but thriving collector’s market ensures that originals routinely fetch three figure sums.

We may never know why the group failed to ignite as some of their contemporaries; but what we do know, is we have two beautiful, much-loved albums available again, in a delightfully clean remaster, for the delight and delectation of all. And whereas we might be over familiar with our copies of In Search Of The Lost Chord and In The Court Of The Crimson King, Cressida and Asylum are full of sweet, yearning and strange, unfamiliar surprises, yet to be discovered.

The roots of Cressida were sown in March 1968, when guitarist “Rock & Roll” John Heyworth answered an advertisement in Melody Maker, and later travelled to London to join The Dominators, a band whose situation he later described as “hopeless – until Angus Cullen applied for the lead singer spot”. He and Heyworth hit it off immediately, and Heyworth was invited to stay at Cullen’s family flat in Barkstone Gardens near Earl’s Court. The pair settled down to some serious writing, eventually welcoming bassist Kevin McCarthy and drummer Iain Clark to the fold and now calling themselves Charge.

The band’s early setlists included covers of songs by The Doors (“Spanish Caravan”), The Drifters (“Save The Last Dance For Me”) and Spirit (“Fresh Garbage”), alongside original compositions by Cullen and Heyworth. In the Summer of 1969, shortly after returning from a German tour, the band’s organist Lol Coker decided to leave, and moved back to Liverpool to marry his Swiss girlfriend and take over his father’s business. He had stayed just long enough to play on the band’s first demo, which got them a recording contract with Vertigo Records.

Peter Jennings then joined. “I was auditioned at the Roebuck pub in Chiswick, a place they sometimes used for rehearsals”, he later remembered. “I imagine we ran through a 12-bar or two and possibly they tried me out on one of the numbers from their set, but anyway they liked the way I fitted in and I joined them that day”. Jennings’ previous musical experience included blues gigs playing 12-string guitar in tandem with ex-Paramounts pianist Andy Staines, and (in 1968–69) White Rabbit with drummer Ron Berg and guitarist Andy Rickell (a.k.a. Android Funnel). After White Rabbit came to an end, Jennings played with several short-lived bands.

At this point the band settled on the name Cressida. “None of the band considered Charge that wonderful a name. We decided after some discussion on a name taken from the William Shakespeare play Troilus and Cressida. Their first gigs as Cressida were in Germany, including the Star-Club in Hamburg sharing the bill withColosseum and East Of Eden, in the Autumn of 1969. Their manager at the time, Mike Rosen, also drove their Transit van and, being a trumpet player (he later joinedMogul Thrash), occasionally joined the band on stage for some of their more extended numbers. But Rosen soon fell out with producer Ossie Byrne (of early Bee Geesfame), and from that point Mel Baister assumed managerial duties.

Other forays into Europe included a trip to Bratislava in November 1969, where they performed at the end of a week’s competition between various bands from the Eastern bloc; a week supporting Black Sabbath at Brussels’ Theatre 140; and a performance at the Open Circus (an event held in a large tent with lion taming, fire eating and other side shows) in Rouen, France, alongside Brian Auger, Barclay James Harvest, Man and Circus.

Cressida mostly played the university and college circuits, as well as London clubs such as the Speakeasy, Revolution, Blaises and the Marquee Club. The first LP was recorded at Wessex Studios with Byrne producing. It consisted of songs by either Cullen or Heyworth (who handled lead vocals on one), plus one contribution each by Jennings and Clark.

Cressida went through a difficult phase when Heyworth was forced to leave in early 1970. Around this time, the band recorded a more commercial track intended for single release, “Situation”, but Vertigo chose not to issue it. The song is now available on a double-CD release of the band’s complete recordings, The Vertigo Years Anthology 1969-1971.

Cressida – “Cressida” Album cover photo (front)

CRESSIDA 1970 1

Cressida – “Cressida” Album photo  

 

CRESSIDA 1970

Cressida Band’s photo

CRESSIDA BAND 2

Cressida – “Cressida” Full Album Download Link on Culture 4 All Blog

Cressida Discography/Full Albums/Download Links on Rutracker Org

Cressida Band’s Page on Spotify

Cressida – “Cressida” Full Album Download Link on Apple Music

Cressida Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums/Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

 

Hard Rock/Heavy Acid Rock/Proto Heavy Metal Australia 1970s (Tracks) Buffalo – “Freedom”

Hard Rock/Heavy Acid Rock/Proto Heavy Metal Australia 1970s (Tracks)

Buffalo (Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

“Freedom”(written by Tice/Baxter) A2 track included on the album “Volcanic Rock”

Released on Vertigo Records ( 6357 101) in August 1973

Line-up/Credits :

Dave Tice – lead vocals

Peter Wells – bass

John Baxter – guitar

Jimmy Economou – drums

 

Art Direction [Art Director] – Ian Brown

Engineer – Wahanui ”Wyn” Wynyard

Executive-Producer – Dermot Hoy

Illustration – J. Phillip Thomas

Photography By – Van Der Ley, Taylor

Producer – Spencer Lee

Volcanic Rock originally issued as Vertigo 6357 101 (August 1973)

1. SUNRISE (COME MY WAY) (Album version) (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
2. FREEDOM (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
3. TILL MY DEATH (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
4. THE PROPHET (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
5. INTRO: POUND OF FLESH (John Baxter/Peter Wells)
6. SHYLOCK (Dave Tice/John Baxter)

Lyrics :

“Freedom”
Your senses are returning,
you’ll soon be on your way
the old bridges burning,
it’s your new life’s first day
so lift up your head
and rise the banner high
the older is dead and a new flag will fly.
As you travel down the highway,
and you open up your mind
and move down each byway
understand the truths you find
and remember don’t deny
another who’s in need
and there’s reason still to cry,
until every man is free.
If you open up your eyes,
you’ll understand the things moan
and someday you’ll see why
men die for their dreams
travel on to freedom, travel on to freedom
travel on to freedom, travel on to freedom
Buffalo was an Australian rock band formed in August 1971 by founding mainstay Dave Tice on lead vocals (ex-Head). Fellow founders, also from Head, were Paul Balbi on drums, John Baxter on guitar, and Peter Wells on bass guitar; together with Alan Milano on lead vocals (ex-Mandala). Milano left after their debut album, Dead Forever… (June 1972), and Balbi was replaced on drums by Jimmy Economou. Their next two albums, Volcanic Rock (July 1973) and Only Want You For Your Body (June 1974), were also issued by Vertigo Records. After 1975 line-up changes resulted in a more commercial sound and the group disbanded in March 1977. Australian musicologist Ian McFarlane noted that there was “nothing subtle about Buffalo’s primal, heavyweight sound, but it was delivered with a great deal of conviction … combining the dense, occult riffing … with the progressive blues chops … the band certainly captured the arrogant disposition of the times in a bold and thunderous fashion”. Alongside Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs and Blackfeather, Buffalo pioneered Australia’s heavy metal, pub rock and alternative rock movements. Peter Wells died on 27 March 2006, aged 58.
Buffalo were an Australian hard rock band formed in August 1971 in Sydney by founding mainstay Dave Tice on co-lead vocals (ex-Head). Fellow founders, also from Brisbane’s blues-rockers Head, were Paul Balbi on drums, John Baxter on guitar, and Peter Wells on bass guitar. Tice and Wells had been together in groups since 1966 with The Odd Colours and Strange Brew before forming Head in 1968. Head had relocated to Sydney in mid-1970, its line-up changed with the acquisition of Alan Milano on co-lead vocals (ex-Mandala) and a new musical direction led to the name change. ‘Buffalo’ was chosen (according to legend, randomly off an Australian map) as being more marketable than ‘Head’, with its sexual and drug connotations. Alongside Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs and Blackfeather, Buffalo pioneered Australia’s heavy metal, pub rock and alternative rock movements. Buffalo were the first Australian act to be signed to Vertigo Records, however they remained largely an underground band.
In May 1972 they issued their debut single, “Suzie Sunshine”, which was written by Baxter and Peter Brett. It was followed in the next month by their debut album, Dead Forever…, which was produced by Spencer Lee. Both the single and album sold well with the album sales reaching 25,000. This was despite commercial radio virtually blacklisting the band – they received little airplay prior to the emergence of public radio stations (such as Triple J and 3RRR) in the mid-1970s. Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, described the album’s cover as “controversial” in that it depicted “a mournful, blood-soaked face peering through the eye socket of a skull” while buyers were advised to “Play this album LOUD”. After Dead Forever… appeared, Milano left, and Jimmy Economou replaced Balbi on drums. In mid-January 1973 Buffalo supported Black Sabbath at two Sydney shows on the Australian leg of the United Kingdom heavy rockers’ Volume IV Tour. According to Australian rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll, “The seeds for Australian heavy rock can be traced back to two important sources, Billy Thorpe’s Seventies Aztecs and Sydney band Buffalo, who came from the Black Sabbath/Uriah Heep school, and were signed to the same label as those groups (Vertigo) in Australia”.
The four-piece line-up of Baxter, Economou, Tice and Wells recorded their next two albums, Volcanic Rock (July 1973) and Only Want You For Your Body (June 1974), with Lee producing again. Allmusic’s Eduardo Rivadavia found their second album was “about as raw as heavy metal got in the early 1970s” and “all of its crudity was absolutely intentional”. He felt that their third album had the group “honing their songwriting into far more focused and compact heavy rock nuggets”. McFarlane stated that the band had “kept up the scorching, heavy metal mayhem, with Baxter’s savage guitar work and Tice’s demented vocals well to the fore” for both albums. Their use of controversial cover artwork continued: Volcanic Rock has a “graphic yet hilarious depiction of the female form as a menstruating volcano” while Only Want You For Your Body has an “obese, screaming woman shackled to a torture rack”. Some record chains refused to stock these albums. By mid-1974 Norm Roue (ex-Band of Light) had joined on slide guitar and later that year Baxter was fired from the group. McFarlane declared they had “lost one of its most valuable and distinctive assets and its spirit simply dwindled”.

During 1975 Karl Taylor joined on guitar and a change of music direction – towards more commercially oriented hard rock to attain greater radio airplay – followed with their next album, Mother’s Choice, appearing in March 1976. Steve Danno-Lorkin at I-94 Bar website felt it was “a big move forward with the times, more traditional in the song structuring and the lyric topics”; whereas a second reviewer, The Barman, described the same album, “starts with a bang … before slowing to a plod … the music drags rather than seizes the moment”. The line-up and direction changes continued with Roue and Taylor replaced by Chris Turner (ex-Drain) on guitar and, briefly, Chris Stead was their second guitarist. Wells left before the end of the year to form another hard rock group, Rose Tattoo. Wells had “decided to form the band that became Rose Tattoo, decided on their style of boogie and blues music, and their street look, united by their tattooed bodies”.

Buffalo disbanded in March 1977 when Tice travelled to London to join local rock group, The Count Bishops alongside his former band mate, Balbi. Late the previous year, Tice and latter day Buffalo members: Economou, Turner and Ross Sims on bass guitar, had recorded a final studio album, Average Rock ‘n’ Roller, which appeared in July 1977. McFarlane was disappointed with “Buffalo’s attempt at a more commercial sound, but [it] lacked the coherent direction of their predecessors”. Danno-Lorkin felt it was “very self indulgent” and “tracks on this don’t work quite so well as instrumentally they seems a bit lacking in direction or purpose”. The Barman noted that despite its title it was “well above average” and is “more a rock effort than the blues/boogie-fuelled Mother’s Choice”.

McFarlane noted that there was “nothing subtle about Buffalo’s primal, heavyweight sound, but it was delivered with a great deal of conviction … combining the dense, occult riffing … with the progressive blues chops … the band certainly captured the arrogant disposition of the times in a bold and thunderous fashion”.  Buffalo pre-dated other early Australian hard rockers: Coloured Balls (formed March 1972), AC/DC (late 1973), The Angels (1974, as The Keystone Angels), and Rose Tattoo (late 1976). Like many pioneering heavy metal acts, Buffalo incorporated strong influences of blues-rock and psychedelic rock. The band toured across Australia, at venues ranging from school dances in tiny halls to large outdoor concerts. Heavy Planet website considers Buffalo to anticipate doom metal and stoner rock.

By the end of 1972, Australia’s legendary progressive rock heavy weights Buffalo had established themselves as a prominent force on the local rock scene. The band’s debut album Dead forever… had sold well enough yet its true significance was rating as the very first Australian release on the prestigious Vertigo imprint which gained them valuable attention overseas.

The line-up had remained stable since the band’s inception in August 1971: Dave Tice (vocals), John Baxter (guitar), Pete Wells (bass), Alan Milano (vocals) and Paul Balbi (drums). Nevertheless, they were in a curious position when it came to their live appearances, with their local gigging schedule having dropped off considerably. As writer Richard Lyones reported in Sydney-based rock paper Sound Blast(December 1972): “The amazing thing is that, despite the tremendous sales of “Dead Forever”, despite their now international standing, despite the huge crowd they pulled to Paddo Town Hall earlier this year, promoters just aren’t booking them. Despite all that proof to the contrary, some promoters say they believe Buffalo isn’t profitable.”

This seems to have hung heavy on the band’s collective minds because they almost split up before the year was over. Tice had actually joined a new band called Mr. Madness being put together by four ex-members of Sydney-based psych-pop outfit Flake. The new band commenced gigging, but then the bosses at Buffalo’s record label, Phonogram/Vertigo, wanted them to support legendary British heavy metal demi-gods Black Sabbath at two Sydney concerts (Hordern Pavilion, 16th and 17th January 1973) as part of their second Australian tour (promoting the Volume 4 album). This was an opportunity too good to miss: Sabbath was one of the biggest bands of the day and indeed the local boys had often been compared favourably to the Brit metal masters. Tice remembers finishing the support slots to Sabbath, rushing offstage, jumping into a waiting car and heading across town to fulfill his singing role with Mr. Madness for three sets a night at Chequers disco. Naturally, his long-term allegiance lay with only one band: Buffalo.

Dave Tice remembers the Black Sabbath supports as “being really important shows… After I’d split, the record company came to us and said ‘fellas, you’ve got your album out, it’s sold well, we don’t want you to split up, Black Sabbath is coming and we want you as support band’. Dead forever… had been out for a while and we were on the same label as Black Sabbath of course, Vertigo. There was some discussion about whether we were gonna do it or not and we decided to do it and thankfully it was really good. I don’t remember seeing Black Sabbath because I had to leave straight away to play with Mr. Madness, but the reception we got was exceptional. I’ve had people come up to me in recent years and they say ‘oh I remember when you guys supported Black Sabbath and you blew them away’, y’know? Now, of course that is a matter of perspective but it’s nice to have people come up to you and say that.”

“Supporting Black Sabbath was a real highlight for me!” John Baxter declares. “We played to big crowds on both nights and we went over pretty well. Unfortunately we never got to meet Sabbath. On the first night I went up to their dressing room, knocked on the door but there was nobody around. I just stuck my head in and saw Tony Iommi’s guitar. I thought, ‘I’ll go and have a look at this’. So I walked up to it and I was feeling the strings and they were like elastic bands, they felt real soft and they were probably real light strings as well. And then a roadie walked in so I had to make a quick exit (laughs). That was it, nothing was said. So at least I touched Tony Iommi’s guitar for a split second. But it was a great gig for us. For a band that never got any radio airplay, to support Black Sabbath was fantastic.”

Revitalised Spirits

With the band’s spirits revitalised, their touring schedule immediately picked up. They scored another important support slot on the national package tour by British bands Slade, Lindisfarne, Status Quo and Caravan that did the outdoor concert rounds during February. Now down to a streamlined four-piece line-up of Tice, Baxter, Wells and new drummer Jimmy Economou, Buffalo ploughed ahead with more determination than ever and commenced work on their second album at United Sound Studios. Sound Blast reported that United Sound had recently imported new quadraphonic (four-channel) recording equipment and that the first to use the facilities would be none other than Buffalo! While working with the same producer/executive producer team of Spencer Lee and Dermot Hoy, this seemed the ideal opportunity to make an impact on record, yet the quadraphonic recordings never eventuated. What did eventuate, however, is one of the band’s greatest records and essentially the first real heavy psych metal album ever issued in Australia: the absolutely blazing Volcanic Rock (Vertigo 6357 101).

The importance of Volcanic Rock can never be overstated. This is the album that established the band’s reputation for dispensing uncompromising heavy psych rock of monumental proportions; this is the album that continues to enthrall aficionados of the genre the world over.

With the new album and its single, ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ b/w ‘Pound of Flesh’ (Philips 6037 035) out by August, the band was regularly headlining its own gigs around Sydney and interstate. They also picked up a major support gig (alongside the La De Das, Mighty Kong, Country Radio and Hush) to Sherbet and the Aztecs at the AMCO Supershow, Liverpool Speedway in December.

Reviews of the album were positive: “Buffalo is back. And that’s good news for those who like their rock steamin’ hot and raunchy… and Australian! (The album) thumps, it bumps and grinds gut solid from go to woe. The music howls and screams all around, and over guitar and bass riffs. It’s what you would expect from Buffalo, and that makes it easy to decide about the record… The production is good too. It’s going to be compared to Black Sabbath, but what the hell, Australia needs a band like that anyway!” (Sound Blast, August 1973).

Melbourne based Go-Set magazine never really warmed to Buffalo, describing the single ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ as: “Heavy, solid, fast-moving rock. But sadly it sounds Sunbury ’72 – and strong music doesn’t date. The vocalist has a powerful gnawing sort of voice, earthy and interesting. But the Steppenwolf influences are too obvious. Other side, Pound of Flesh, is musically more fulfilling. There’s the steady pounding rhythmic section and a guitar which does some nice intricate things in a lively pulsating sort of way.”

Irrespective of the views at the time, there’s no denying the album’s power to this day. Buffalo had already earned a reputation as macho progressive heavies with the release of Dead forever…, but it was Volcanic Rock that cemented the legend. With its full quota of scorching, molten heavy metal, Volcanic Rock sounds as sweet as a Mach truck driving through a china shop, with twice as much crunch to boot! Tracks like ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ with its frenzied intro and pounding beat, ‘Shylock’ and ‘Till My Death’ typified the band’s attitude and approach: raw, hard-nosed riff rock, as dirty, loud and vicious as hell. Epic tracks like ‘Freedom’ and ‘The Prophet’ saw the band members stretching out and flexing their musical muscle. These songs are essentially loose jams built up in the studio, but that doesn’t detract from the overall impact.

An interesting point to note is that for the original album program, ‘Pound of Flesh’ and ‘Shylock’ were sequenced together as one long, two-part track.

“Oh Shylock… pay me now!”

“This is a very subjective thing, but I think tracks like ‘Shylock’, ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’, ‘Freedom’ and ‘The Prophet’ are pretty much quintessential Buffalo tracks; they’re what I would really hang the band on, y’know?” Dave Tice explained. “They had that stream of consciousness thing going on, where we jammed them out in the studio; they are perfect examples of that. With ‘The Prophet’, John said to me recently, ‘I never realised what good lyrics you wrote Dave’, and quite religious in some ways. I guess John used to think that the lyrics, without sitting down and analysing them, were almost blasphemous and a little risqué. There is a bit of that but there’s a semi-religious content to them as well which is not so obvious. I think he discovered that himself in recent times. I don’t think he always took much notice of the lyrics whereas I used to labour over them quite a bit because I had to sing the damn things, y’know? Sometimes, with lyrics you write them down and then you’re appalled with having to deliver them. What might look good on paper might not come out so well when you sing them (laughs). But I could always make them work.”

“In my opinion ‘Shylock’ was our top live song, the song Buffalo we’re most recognised for,” Baxter confirms. “That was the song we played at every gig. That epitomised our style. I’d written the music at home and when I took it to the guys in rehearsals I said ‘look, I’ve got this idea, I don’t know, it’s not that good, do you wanna hear it?’ So Dave said ‘yeah, yeah, play it’. So I played it and they liked it. It was good that they did, otherwise I probably would have tossed it out. It became our most popular live song.”

Buffalo appeared at a concert held in Hyde Park for the Sydney Spring Festival 1973. Pop band Sherbet headlined the concert bill and Baxter remembers the day as wet and overcast. Nevertheless, Buffalo delivered an absolutely blazing rendition of the momentous ‘Shylock’ and all fans of the band will be intrigued to hear it after more than 30 years.

Baxter continues, warming to the memories: “The first album had a bit of variety on there; we were obviously still finding our way. It probably wasn’t the exact sound we were after but at the time we were happy with it. After that we went full on hard rock; no ballads. It was more my influences because I am a head banger. For Volcanic Rock we just decided to go full on, we recorded it live in the studio without any touch-ups. It was a very raw sound which is what we were aiming for. I’m not a ballad person myself. Being the main songwriter, I wrote all the music and got the songs going and then Dave would add his lyrics later. I’d bring ideas to rehearsal and then we’d jam on them and develop the songs from there. The music was up to me and that’s where we headed. The other guys were happy to head that way as well. I’m a heavy metal player; that’s what I do best.”

“The sound I developed came with the Gibson SG guitar and the Australian made Strauss Hurricane amplifier that I used; nothing else in between except occasional wah wah. It was a 200 watt RMS valve amp with two quad boxes. I used to love that amp! I’ve used Marshalls, Lennards, AC30s, all sorts of other amps and they never matched up to that Strauss amp. That amp’s gone now, I had to sell it. I also sold the SG quite a while ago. I was happy with my playing on the albums, there are little things I look back on now and think ‘it’s a pity that’s there’ or ‘I could have done a bit better there’. I think I did a pretty good job. From Volcanic Rock onwards, that four year period I was at my peak. Volcanic Rock and Only Want You for Your Body are the most representative albums when it comes to my guitar playing style.”

Wells indeed shares that opinion: “I think the best album is Volcanic Rock; we just seemed to capture a certain sound. It just seems to have survived the best. Generally speaking, just the style of playing and approach seems to make sense to me. I can’t remember that much about recording it; I’ve done a lot of recording since then so it’s very hard to remember specific recording sessions. ‘Shylock’ was always one of our gun numbers for sure. It always seemed to work when we played it live and people always liked it. If there’s any song from that era that people always focus on, that’s the one.”

Instrumentally the members of Buffalo were indeed at the top of their game on Volcanic Rock with Baxter’s savage guitar work and Wells’ throbbing, woody bass lines being real highlights, while Tice’s vocals never sounded so demented. Likewise, when drummer Economou really got wound up, there was basically no way of stopping him short of a sharp blow to the head. The album came with a fold-out illustrated lyric sheet, as well as featuring a garish and controversial gatefold cover illustration by J. Phillip Thomas: a graphic yet hilarious depiction of the female form as a menstruating volcano! To top it off, a fiery denizen of the volcano holds aloft a glowing, phallic shaped molten rock. Wonder what the feminists of the day had to say about that little lot!

“The Volcanic Rock cover, we thought it was pretty cool!” Tice laughs now. “I am surprised we got away with it at the time. From memory, there were two or three different designs put forward and the artwork that got used was the last one that the record company wanted to use (laughs). Only Want You for Your Body was the same too. The record company were shitting themselves what people might think. Ross Barlow was head of Phonogram at the time, and he was overseas when the Volcanic Rock artwork was getting put together and he sent a telex from New York or somewhere saying ‘watch what you guys put on the front cover’, y’know, and when he got back that’s what he was confronted with (laughs).”

“Our idea was to be controversial. Now those things aren’t considered controversial anymore although Volcanic Rock still has a certain amount of shock value especially to our feminist cousins. They still find it offensive and that’s good I reckon, because that’s what we were trying to do. You know, we wanted people to say ‘what the fuck is this; we’d better have a listen’. It’s the visual experience that can entice you; often you’d listen to an album because you saw something that appealed to you graphically on the cover. That’s always been very important. I continue to tell people ‘it’s no good making a great record and then sticking it in a package that no-one’s gonna take any notice of’, y’know? You might as well just hide it away. If you wanted people to take notice of you then you’d better damn well stand out!”

Baxter laughs too, but for a slightly different reason. “Volcanic Rock… That cover was a bit embarrassing to me. That demon on the volcano should have been holding a guitar above his head, I reckon, not what he was holding. I thought that was ridiculous (laughs). He should have been holding a flaming guitar. I would be much happier with that now. At the time we just thought it looked good. It did stand out; it was outlandish and caught people’s attention. That was the tactic we had to employ. No airplay, so we had to get people to listen to our music somehow. The record company was good; they didn’t push us too much. We had a very supportive and enthusiastic producer in Dermot Hoy. He saw our potential in the first place and he made the way clear for us to record our albums. With the covers, the company came up with the ideas and Ian Brown from the art department would say ‘okay, we’ll get the artwork done and we’ll okay it with you’. Usually we liked the artwork; I think the concepts were accepted straight away.”

“Some day sunrise coming my way…”

The album version of ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ was noteworthy, in that it’s a full minute longer than the single edit wherein the lead break mid-song had been excised for the sake of expected radio airplay. Nevertheless, it seems unlikely that anyone held out much hope for a Buffalo hit single! What’s more, the single version was in mono and noticeable for the fact that it lacked the dual lead guitar lines in the intro. Interestingly, most of the singles released by Phonogram on the blue and silver Philips label of the day were mono mixes. The mono single version of ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ appeared again as part of the rare Buffalo EP (Vertigo 6237 001) in 1974, alongside ‘Suzie Sunshine’, ‘Dead Forever’ and ‘Barbershop Rock’. We’ve included both the album and mono single versions here for comparison. As a reference point it’s worth noting that a tremendous live rendition of the song, recorded in October 1974 at Sydney’s Hordern Pavilion, was broadcast on the ABC-TV’s rock show GTK (Get To Know).

The 1973/74 period proved to be a busy and exciting time for Buffalo. They were on a roll, and following the release of Volcanic Rock they recorded their next album and continued to tour; however, the wind of change was howling and ructions towards the end of 1974 were set to destroy the band’s resolve and spirit.

By way of concluding this portion of the Buffalo story, Tice says “I still love those Buffalo albums. For a long time I didn’t listen to them. I couldn’t listen to them, I’d moved on. As you progress through your musical career there’s a time where you look back with disdain at what you did previously. You hope that you’re progressing, getting better at what you do. What I tended to hear when I did listen to the albums was the things I wasn’t happy with, the things that I thought were mistakes. I’d think, ‘I could have done that a bit better’ or ‘I didn’t hit the note quite right there’, y’know? You need a bit more distance to have perspective on these things. I’ve got a lot more perspective on it now; I can enjoy them again now. I can see them for what they were; I don’t need to justify them now. Also, you become more at ease with these kinds of things with the weight of other people’s opinions, you know what I’m saying?”

“I listen to the albums now and say ‘okay, we were young guys but the noises we made then are still being appreciated today’. And that continues to amaze me but I can see why now. Once upon a time I couldn’t see that. You’re too close to it, but you can’t divorce yourself completely from something that is really an expression of your personality at the time. If you have reason to want to put that behind you, it becomes a bit of an embarrassment. That might be a bit of a harsh word, but you know what I’m saying. You might think, ‘how could I have been so naïve?’ It’s got nothing to do with your technical ability as a singer or musician, but your perception of the world and how you relate to it does change drastically over time. I can look back and say ‘well it still stands up, I don’t have to be embarrassed by it, I think it’s fucking good work’, y’know? I hear myself singing and I think, ‘fuck Dave, you’re really not a bad singer at all’. There are some good songs there and thankfully I can see it within the context of which it was done.”

Wells is likewise down to earth when he states, “I’m not sure why the music still stands up. It’s a range of different things. I always ask people about that, younger people who have only been into the music for the last decade or so. I ask them, ‘well, why do you like the music’ and they say that it reminds them of a bunch of newer bands that have that same style. They just like it. Personally, I’ve got no idea why people still like the music. It’s a bit of a mystery to me really. There’s just a certain quality about the sound that appeals. It’s usually fans of that style of music and they’ve got all sorts of collectable records, they’re very enthusiastic about the music and they just go out of their way to collect it. They’re very keen on the music across the board.”

“I’ll be interested to see the reaction to these new CDs,” Wells concedes. “I don’t know if people will buy them. Will the old guys like them, will the young kids like them? I’m just interested to see who will buy them and who will relate to them. It’s all a bit of a mystery to me. Dave still works all the time, so do I, but the other guys who were in the band don’t play much now, so it’ll be interesting to see what everyone makes of the albums. There are the real record enthusiasts who will like the CDs, but the general record buying public couldn’t care less I’m sure.”

 

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Album cover photo (front)

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buffalo volcanic rock 2

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Album artwork

buffalo volcanic rock 3

Buffalo – “Freedom” Video file link on YouTube

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Full Album Audio file link on Spotify

Buffalo Band’s Page on Discogs

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Full Album Download file link on Rockasteria Blog

Buffalo Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Buffalo Revisited Band’s Page on Facebook

 

 

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Warhorse – “Back In Time”

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) 

Warhorse (U.K.)

“Back In Time” (written by Warhorse) A2 track included on the album “Red Sea”

Released on Vertigo Records ( 6360 066) on 29th March 1972

Red Sea is the second and last album by English hard rock band Warhorse. The band is most known for his bass player, who was the original bassist of Deep Purple (“Mark 1”) from 1968–1969 for the first three albums.

Within weeks of Nick Simper’s final show with Deep Purple on July 4th 1969, he had played the Isle Of Wight Festival as part of singer Marsha Hunt’s backing band White Trash, and was beginning to plan a new group of his own.

After just a couple of gigs with Marsha, Nick realised that the rest of her band weren’t really up to the job, said as much, and found himself with the job of finding suitable replacements. He roped in Ged Peck on guitar (with whom he’d toured with The Flowerpot Men and Billie Davis), and his old Pirates band-mate Roger Pinner (aka Roger Truth) on drums. Pinner was soon replaced by Mac Poole. While this was going on Nick still found time for outside work, playing BBC sessions with The James Royal Set, and also putting together his own extracurricular band.

Ged Peck and Mac Poole were first on board, followed by singer Ashley Holt, who had auditioned for Deep Purple back in 1968. The James Royal Set’s keyboard player Rick Wakeman took part in early rehearsals but proved unreliable, and when the band’s first demo was recorded in April 1970 he was replaced by Frank Wilson. Very soon afterwards the band became a full time operation when Marsha Hunt folded her group due to the fact that she was pregnant by Mick JaggerInitial events made it look as if Warhorse’s starting path would be similar to that of Deep Purple. A record contract quickly arrived (with the new Vertigo label), an album was recorded, and the band made their debut live show – supporting Mott The Hoople in Hemel Hempstead.

‘Warhorse’ was released in November 1970, sounding pretty much like a heavier version of Deep Purple Mk1, and fully illustrating how much Nick Simper had contributed to both bands. However, Vertigo’s promotion concentrated more on the label than the album, and it undeservedly failed to chart, as did the belated single ‘St.Louis’ (an Easybeats song which had been in Deep Purple’s live repetoire until August 1969). Around the same time, Ged Peck made his exit, apparently after increasing difficulty in dealiing with Simper’s pre-eminence in the group. His replacement was Pete Parks from Black August, a band who had been sharing Warhorse’s rehearsal room.

Warhorse had built up a healthy live following inside their first year, and continued to do so when Pete Parks seamlessly stepped in on guitar, but the band’s fortunes had already peaked.They were forced to rush the recording of their second album ‘Red Sea’, which nevertheless received favourable press reviews, and pushed the band’s heavy credentials forward by being more guitar based than its predecessor. However, it received very little label promotion, and soon after its June 1972 release Warhorse were dropped from the roster. Around the same time Mac Poole decided to throw his lot in with Gong, after having deputised with them for a few shows.

Drummer Mac Poole was replaced by Barney James, and Warhorse picked themselves up yet again, this time beginning to incorporate soul elements into their music.After a time Rick Wakeman appeared back in the scene. He produced a set of demos for the band, and then borrowed Holt and James to help record his UK #1 ‘Journey To The Centre of The Earth’ solo album. Despite the fact that a new record contract for Warhorse was in the offing, both men decided to throw their lot in permanenty with Wakeman, and in June 1974 Nick Simper decided to bring the band to a close.

Line-up/Credits :

Ashley Holt – Vocals
Mac Poole – Drums
Nick Simper – Bass
Frank Wilson – Keyboards, Piano
Peter Parks – Guitar

Additional personnel :

Peter Parks – acoustic guitar

Rick Breach – photography, sleeve art, sleeve design

Dave Stock – engineer

Phillip Walker – liner notes

Nick Watson – remastering (CD reissue)

Warhorse – “Red Sea” Album cover photo (front)

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Warhorse – “Red Sea” Album cover photo (A’ Side)

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Warhorse – “Back In Time” Video file link on YouTube

Warhorse – “Red Sea” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Warhorse – “Red Sea” Full Album Audio file link on Spotify

Warhorse – “Red Sea” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

Warhorse – “Red Sea” Full Album Download file link on Back In Purple 70 Blog

Warhorse Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums/Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Warhorse Band’s Page/Family Tree on Deep Purple Net Page

Warhorse Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Warhorse Band’s Page on Discogs

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Folk/Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Gravy Train – “The New One”

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Folk/Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks)

Gravy Train (Lancashire, U.K.)

“The New One” A’ Side single (7′) 

Released in 1970 on Vertigo Records (6059 047)

Line-up/Credits :

Norman Barratt / guitar, lead vocals

J. D. Hughes / alto & tenor flutes, vocals

Lester Williams / bass, vocals

Barry Davenport / drums

Gravy Train – “The New One” Single Album cover photo (front)

GRAVY TRAIN THE NEW ONE

Gravy Train – “The New One” Video file link on YouTube

Gravy Train – “The New One” Audio file link on Spotify