Brian Eno – “An Ending Ascent” (1983)

Artist : Brian Eno (Brian Peter George St John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno, born  on 15th May 1948, in Woodbridge, Suffolk, U.K.)

Country Of Origin : U.K. 

Track : “An Ending Ascent” (A5 track, instrumental, written by Brian Eno)

Album ” Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” (Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks is the ninth solo studio album by British ambient musician Brian Eno, released in 1983. It was written, produced, and performed by Brian Eno, his brother Roger and Daniel Lanois. Music from the album appeared in the films 28 Days LaterTraffic, and Trainspotting, whose soundtrack sold approximately four million copies. Two of the songs from the album, “Silver Morning” and “Deep Blue Day”, were issued as a 7″ single on EG Records).

Label : EG Records (EGLP 53), Polydor Records (813 535-1)

Date/Year Of Release : July 1983 (recorded Grant Avenue Studio, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 1981-1982)

Category/Music Genres : Ambient, Electronic, Experimental, Soundtracks, Space Ambient U.K. 1980s (Tracks)

Brian Eno

Artist’s photo

Image result for BRIAN ENO

Brian Eno “An Ending Ascent”

Video on YouTube

Brian Eno “An Ending Ascent”

Video on Vimeo

The track is included on the album “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” (A5 track)

“Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Album (released in 1983)

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Album cover photo (front)

Album photo (A’ Side)

Image result for eno apollo

Tracks 

1. “Under Stars” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (4:25)
2. “The Secret Place” (Daniel Lanois, arranged Brian Eno) (3:27)
3. “Matta” (Brian Eno) (4:14)
4. “Signals” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (2:44)
5. “An Ending (Ascent)” (Brian Eno) (4:18)
6. “Under Stars II” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (3:15)
7. “Drift” (Roger Eno, Brian Eno) (3:03)
8. “Silver Morning” (Daniel Lanois) (2:35)
9. “Deep Blue Day” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno) (3:53)
10. “Weightless” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno) (4:28)
11. “Always Returning” (Brian Eno, Roger Eno) (3:49)
12. “Stars” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (7:57)

Line-up

Musicians: Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno

Credits 

Cover Art : Russel Mills
Mastered by Greg Calbi, at Sterling Sound

Co-producer – Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois

Information about the artist 

Brian Eno, in full Brian Peter George St. John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno, (born May 15, 1948, Woodbridge, Suffolk, England), British producer, composer, keyboardist, and singer who helped define and reinvent the sound of some of the most popular bands of the 1980s and ’90s and who created the genre of ambient music.

While an art student in the late 1960s, Eno began experimenting with electronic music, and in 1971 he joined the fledgling band Roxy Music as keyboardist and technical adviser. A rivalry with singer Bryan Ferry led Eno to leave the group in 1973, whereupon he launched a solo career. No Pussyfooting (1973), a collaboration with guitarist Robert Fripp from King Crimson, used tape-echo and tape-delay techniques to create new sounds and reached the Top 30 in Britain. Eno’s next album, Here Come the Warm Jets (1973), was soon followed by the proto-punk single “Seven Deadly Finns.” In the mid-1970s Eno began developing his theory of ambient music, creating subtle instrumentals to affect mood through sound. Albums such as Discrete Music (1975), Music for Films (1978), and Music for Airports(1979) exemplified this approach.

During this period Eno also began producing albums for other artists, and his experimental approach to music making was well suited to such alternative performers as Devo, Ultravox, and David Bowie(especially on Bowie’s trilogy of albums recorded primarily in Berlin). Although Eno’s work was influential, it was not until his collaborations with Talking Heads and U2 that mainstream listeners became familiar with his sound, most notably on Talking Heads’ Top 20 album Remain in Light (1980) and U2’s chart-topping albums Unforgettable Fire (1984), The Joshua Tree (1987), and Achtung Baby(1991).

Throughout the 1990s, Eno joined a number of visual artists to provide sound tracks to installation pieces, and in 1995 he worked with Laurie Anderson on Self Storage, a series of installations housed in individual lockers at a London storage facility. Anderson provided the vocals for a track on Eno’s electronic album Drawn from Life (2000), and Eno followed with a rare vocal album of his own, Another Day on Earth (2005). He returned to the producer’s chair for Paul Simon’s critically lauded Surprise (2006) and Coldplay’s multi-platinum Viva la Vida (2008).

In 2008 Eno teamed with former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne for their first collaborative effort in nearly three decades. Adopting the self-publishing model popularized by Radiohead, Byrne and Eno released Everything That Happens Will Happen Today on the Internet, where listeners could stream the entire album for free or purchase physical or digital copies directly from the artists. Also in 2008 Eno and Peter Chilvers debuted the first of several smartphone apps that allowed the user to create generative music. Eno later collaborated with Karl Hyde of the British electronic band Underworld for the Afrobeat-inspired Someday World and the more accessible High Life (both in 2014) and with pianist Tom Rogerson on Finding Shore (2017). Among Eno’s own albums, the four-track The Ship (2016) meditated on the sinking of the Titanic and on World War I. In 2018 he released a box set of music commissioned for art pieces, Music for Installations (source : encyclopedia “Britannica”).

Information about the album/track

The track, along with the rest of the album, was composed for the film For All Mankind, a documentary on the early years of NASA. The film wasn’t completed until 1989.
Aside from those that feature country & western guitar, “An Ending (Ascent)” stands out from Brian Eno’s other ambient tracks due to its clear use of discernible (yet slow-moving) melody.
The track has appeared in a number of media uses, including in the TV series JamTop Gear and Nip/Tuck; films Traffic28 Days Later and Drive; and David Firth’s animation Salad Fingers.
Frou Frou sampled the track in their song “Hear Me Out” in 2002, as did Burial in 2006 for “Forgive” (source : “Songfacts”).

This music was originally recorded in 1983 for a feature-length documentary movie called “Apollo” later retitled For All Mankind, directed by Al Reinert. The original version of the film had no narration, and simply featured 35mm footage of the Apollo moon missions collected together roughly chronologically, and set to Eno’s music as it appears on the album. Although the film had some limited theatrical runs at art house cinemas in some cities, audience response was lukewarm. The filmmakers still felt the film could do better if it reached a wider audience, and so they re-edited the film, added commentaries from the Apollo astronauts themselves, re-structured the music, and re-titled the film in the process. Various edits of the film were shown to test audiences for further refining. As all this was going on, the film’s release was delayed until 1989. By that time several tracks on the album were omitted from the soundtrack and replaced by other pieces by Eno and other artists.

The tracks from the album that remain on the final edit of the film are:

  • “Always Returning”
  • “Drift”
  • “Silver Morning”
  • “Stars”
  • “Under Stars”
  • “The Secret Place”
  • “An Ending (Ascent)”

The newer tracks from the film that are not on the album (but appear on Music for Films III) are:

  • “Sirens” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois)
  • “Theme for ‘Opera'” (Brian Eno, Roger Eno)
  • “Fleeting Smile” Roger Eno)
  • “Tension Block” (Daniel Lanois)
  • “Asian River” (Brian Eno)
  • “Quixote” (Roger Eno)
  • “4-Minute Warning” (John Paul Jones)
  • “For Her Atoms” (Lydia Kavina (Theremin), Misha Malin)

In the liner notes, Eno relates that when he watched the Apollo 11 landing in 1969 he felt that the strangeness of that event was compromised by the low quality of the television transmission and an excess of journalistic discussion, and that he wished to avoid the melodramatic and uptempo way it was presented. That philosophy dominated when For All Mankind (“Apollo”) was originally released as a non-narrative collection of NASA stock footage from the Apollo program. The non-narrative version of the film with the Eno soundtrack was released on VHS video in 1990 by the National Geographic Society. An alternative version was also released by NASA featuring audio interviews but omitting the Brian Eno soundtrack.

The album contains a variety of styles. “Under Stars”, “The Secret Place”, “Matta”, “Signals”, “Under Stars II”, and “Stars” are all dark, complicated textures similar to those on Eno’s previous album Ambient 4/On Land. “An Ending (Ascent)”, “Drift”, and “Always Returning” are smoother electronic pieces. “Silver Morning”, “Deep Blue Day”, and “Weightless” are country and western inspired ambient pieces featuring Daniel Lanois on guitar.

Country music, which Eno listened to as a child in Woodbridge on American armed forces radio, was used to “give the impression of weightless space.” 

“Under Stars” is a recurring theme in the album, first appearing as an ambient electronic bed behind a treated guitar. “Under Stars II” is the same composition, but with different effects and treatments. “Stars” is the pure background texture without the guitar.

The track “An Ending (Ascent)” was sampled in the song “Hear Me Out” by the group Frou Frou, in “Forgive” by British producer Burial, additionally in “Ascent” by Michael Dow, a London electronic music producer, and has been used in several films such as Traffic and 28 Days Later, and in the London Olympiad opening (the memorial wall section).

Many of the tracks on the album were recorded with soft “attacks” of each note, then played backwards, with multiple heavy echoes and reverb added in both directions to merge the notes into one long flowing sound with each note greatly overlapping each adjacent note, producing the “floating” effects that Eno desired.

The Yamaha DX7 was used extensively by Eno on the album. “…so many processings and reprocessings – it’s a bit like making soup from the leftovers of the day before, which in turn was made from leftovers…” (making the album) Eno said, “…. Well, I love that music anyway …. what I find impressive about that music is that it’s very concerned with space in a funny way. Its sound is the sound of a mythical space, the mythical American frontier space that doesn’t really exist anymore. That’s why on Apollo I thought it very appropriate, because it’s very much like “space music” — it has all the connotations of pioneering, of the American myth of the brave individual.

n the summer of 2009 a live version of the album was performed at two concerts in the IMAX cinema of London’s Science Museum and in an arrangement by South Korean composer Woojun Lee for the ensemble Icebreaker with featured artist B J Cole on pedal steel guitar. The album was performed in its entirety, with the tracks in a different order, to a silent and edited version of For All Mankind, closer to the original conception than the released version of the film. A revised version was performed twice at the 2010 Brighton Festival, where Eno was guest artistic director, before subsequent touring in the UK, Ireland and mainland Europe.

Due to the heavily processed nature of the studio-based sound on the original tracks, an exact reproduction would have been impossible to reproduce in a live context, so Woojun Lee chose to apply a free interpretation of the sound world and to make an impression of the original tracks through use of Icebreaker’s instrumental resources.

The performances from Brighton were recorded and an album of the live interpretation was released in June 2012 (source : “Wikipedia”).

External Links 

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Brian Eno – “An Ending Ascent” Audio/Video file on Last Fm

Brian Eno Artist’s Homepage

Brian Eno Artist’s Page on Facebook

Brian Eno Artist’s Page on Twitter

Brian Eno – Full Albums Download Links on Lágrima Psicodélica

 

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks) Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales” Track’s video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

Terje Rypdal ( Oslo, Norway)

Terje Rypdal Artist’s photo

Image result for terje rypdal

Related Groups :

Dream (6), Jan Garbarek Quartet, Min Bul, Morning Glory (2), Terje Rypdal Trio, Terje Rypdals Orchestra,The Baden-Baden Free Jazz Orchestra, The Chasers, The Esoteric Circle, The George Russell Sextet,The Hugger Muggers, The New Eternal Rhythm Orchestra, The Terje Rypdal Group, The Tomasz Stanko Septet, The Vanguards

Track :

“Dead Man’s Tales” A1 track included on the album “Bleak House”

Album :

“Bleak House”, released on Polydor Records (184 189) in 1968

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Recorded on Oct 7th, 8th and 22nd 1968, at Roger Arnhoff Lydstudio, Oslo, Norway.

A3: “A free form composition based on an idea by T. Rypdal”. The composer credited for B1 is “xxx”.

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

C- Terje Rypdal / guitar, flute, vocals, producer

With:

Christian Reim / piano, organ (3,5)
Carl Magnus Neumann / alto sax & flute (2,5)
Hans Knudsen / baritone sax (2,5)
Jan Garbarek / tenor sax, flute & bells (2-5)
Frode Thingnæs / trombone & tuba (4,5)
Kjell Haugen / trombone (2,4,5)
Tore Nilsen / trombone (2)
Øivind Westby / trombone (2)
Ditlef Eckhoff / trumpet (2)
Jarl Johansen / trumpet (2-5)
Kåre Furuholmen / trumpet (2,4)
Frøydis Ree Hauge / horn (5,6)
Odd Ulleberg / horn (5,6)
Knut Riisnæs / tenor sax (3), arranger & conductor (2,4,5)
Terje Venaas / bass (2-5)
Tom Karlsen / drums (1)
Jon Christensen / drums (2-5)arl Magnus Neumann (tracks: A2 to B2)

Arranged By – Knut Riisnæs (tracks: A2, B1, B2)

Composed By – Terje Rypdal

Engineer [Recording] – Roger Arnhoff

Photography By – Sohlberg Foto

Producer – Terje Rypdal

Recording Supervisor – Odd Løken

Track-list :

1. Dead Man´s Tale (7:03)
2. Wes (4:15)
3. Winter Serenade (6:04):
– a) Falling Snow
– b) Snow Storm
– c) Melting Snow
4. Bleak House (7:05)
5. Sonority (5:21)
6. A Feeling Of Harmony (2:29)

Total time 33:05

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover/track-list photo (back)

Information related to the artist :

“Wikipedia”

Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. He has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as “N3”.

Rypdal was born in Oslo, the son of a composer and orchestra leader. He studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek’s group and later George Russell’s sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany, in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal’s guitar).

His compositions “Last Nite” and “Mystery Man” were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name.

Rypdal was married (1969–1985) to the Norwegian singer Inger Lise Andersen/Rypdal, and they had two children, the auditor Daniel (1970) and the electronica musician Marius (1977). Rypdal was married again in 1988 to Elin Kristin Bergei (born 28 May 1955). They have two children Ane Izabel (1988) and the guitarist Jakob Rypdal (1989). They (as of 2013) live in Tresfjord.

“All Music”

Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal has an instantly recognizable, difficult to peg style, both an as ensemble player and as a soloist. He has directly or indirectly influenced virtually every one of his countrymen who followed him on the instrument. He is also a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and, perhaps most importantly, a world-class composer. He has written six symphonies, numerous chamber works, and sonatas.

Rypdal was born in Oslo in 1947, the son of a conductor and clarinetist for a military band. He began his musical studies on the piano by the age of five, and at eight added trumpet. He abandoned both instruments at age 13 for the guitar. On his chosen instrument, Rypdal was self-taught. Between 1962 and 1967 he was part of the Vanguards, a Norwegian instrumental rock group modeled on the Ventures and the British Shadows, but all that changed when he heard Jimi Hendrix for the first time. Rypdal started the psychedelic rock band Dream in late 1967; they recorded their sole album, Get Dreamy, for Polydor in 1968. That same year he formed another band with saxophonist Jan Garbarek and drummer Jon Christensen, and released his first ambitious meld of rock, classical, and jazz with Bleak House for Polydor under his own name.

Rypdal originally attended the Technical University in Trondheim to become an electrical engineer, but left to study musicology at the University of Oslo. He later attended the Music Conservatory in Oslo (later renamed the Norwegian State Academy of Music) from 1970-1972, where he studied with composers Finn Mortensen and George Russell. Rypdal was part of Garbarek’s quartet for Afric Pepperbird, the saxophonist’s debut for ECM in 1970. He made his debut as a composer with Eternal Circulation in 1971, which was performed with by the Garbarek Quartet and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Rypdal also played with Russell in concert and in the studio, resulting in several offerings including George Russell Presents the Esoteric Circle, and Electric Sonata for Souls Loved by Nature, both issued in 1971. He appeared on Garbarek’s sophomore ECM date Sart, and recorded his self-titled debut for the label (he has been there ever since) that same year. Some of his sidemen for the date included Garbarek, bassist Arild Andersen, and pianist Bobo Stenson. This album walked a generous line between free jazz, progressive, psychedelic rock, and more avant-garde classical music. It established Rypdal as a composer and guitarist throughout Europe.

In 1972, he appeared on the live, star-studded session that was released as Morning Glory in 1973 on Antilles; the other players included John Surman, John Marshall, Chris Laurence, John Taylor, and Malcolm Griffiths. In 1973, Rypdal recorded with Russell again; the ensuing offering was entitled Listen to the Silence. He also composed Concerto for Violbasso and Orchestra for Barre Phillips. He released two of his own albums for ECM in 1974, Whenever I Seem to Be Far Away and What Comes After.

The year 1975 proved monumental for Rypdal. His Symphony No. 1 was commissioned by Norwegian Television, and he released the widely acclaimed double-album Odyssey, which was regarded as the pinnacle of jazz-rock fusion. The Odyssey Band toured the globe and was especially successful in the U.S.A. In 1976, Rypdal did a turnabout, and released the musically impressionistic After the Rain, on which he performed all instruments. He also recorded with Russell but went back to his ensemble work with 1978’s Waves. Rypdal finished the ’70s with a trio date, co-billed with collaborators bassist Miroslav Vitous and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

He commenced the new decade with Descendre, a trio session with Christensen and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Rypdal played keyboards and flute in addition to guitar. To Be Continued, the second album with Vitous and DeJohnette, appeared in 1981. After touring and an extended break during which he worked on his classical composing, Rypdal emerged with his first duet album for ECM, the vanguard classical, electro-acoustic work, Eos in 1984. The guitarist returned to a trio format for The Chaser and Blue in 1985 and 1986, respectively. The latter year also saw the release of a 1970 date he and Garbarek had recorded with the George Russell Sextet, A Trip to Prillargui, released on Soul Note. Rypdal also recorded his groundbreaking modern classical work, Undisonus in 1986 (though it wouldn’t see release for four more years) and composed two more symphonies. In 1989 he released The Singles Collection, a jazz-rock quartet date that focused on exceedingly brief compositions.

The album, Undisonus for Violin and Orchestra / Ineo for Choir and Chamber Orchestra, was finally released in 1990 to massive critical acclaim, and received the “Work of the Year” prize from the Society of Norwegian Composers. It was followed by the long-form work Q.E.D. in 1993, and the jazz-cum-neo-classical fusion set If Mountains Could Sing in 1995. Also that year, Rypdal recorded as a session player with pianist and composer Ketil Bjørnstad’s group on The Sea, and as part of Surman’s ensemble on Nordic Quartet, both issued on ECM. In 1997, the guitarist issued Skywards, a sextet date that walked the line between formal jazz composition and free improvisation. He finished the decade with Bjørnstad on The Sea II, and a guitar duet recording with Ronni Le Tekrø entitled Tekro II on the Grappa label, both in 1998.

Rypdal began the 21st century busier than ever. In addition to receiving commissions to compose, he was part of Markus Stockhausen’s ensemble on Karta, and saw his own Double Concerto/Fifth Symphony issued by ECM. In 2002, his five-movement work, Lux Æterna for soprano, chamber ensemble, organ, trumpet, and guitar, a second album with Tekrø entitled The Radiosong, and his Sonata Op. 73/Nimbus Op. 76 with violinist Birgitte Stærnes, were all released on different labels. In 2006, Vossabrygg, a live sextet date from 2003 inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew group and early Weather Report, was released by ECM. The date also featured an appearance by Rypdal’s son Marius on turntables and samplers. Life in Leipzig, a duet offering with Bjørnstad, followed in 2008. The large-ensemble tribute to film noir, Crime Scene, appeared in 2010, as did Very Much Alive, a mammoth six-disc concert run by jazz drummer Paolo Vinaccia that featured the guitarist Ståle Storløkken and Mikkelborg. After several festival appearances, the completion of commissions, and some time off, Rypdal returned to recording with 2013’s The Melodic Warrior and large-scale ensemble work conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

“Progarchives”

Born 23 August 1947 (Oslo, Norway)

He is known as one of the leading modern jazz guitarists in Europe. At the same time he is regarded to be an outstanding composer of contemporary art music. Rypdal has has a multifarious musical career since he started his pop band “The Vanguards” in the 1960’ies. He later started up “Dream” where his interest for jazz was awakened. In 1969 he joined the Jan Garbarek Quartet. At the same time he even played in George Russell’s Sextet and big band. Rypdal has up through the years composed numerous jazz compositions for own as well as other groups.

Terje Rypdal played the piano from he was five years old, and started up with guitar from the age of 13. As a guitarist he is self-taught. He has studied musicology at the University in Oslo. During the years 1970-72 he studied composition with Finn Mortensen at the Music Conservatory in Oslo (Later the Norwegian State Academy of Music). He has also studied improvisation with George Russell.

As a composer Rypdal received his first impulses from Ligeti, Penderecki and Mahler and he soon developed his own style. His début as a composer was with “Eternal Circulation” (1971), performed with Jan Garbarek Quartet and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Among his works can be mentioned: Symphony No. 1 (1975) commissioned by the Norwegian Television. His opera “Orfeo Turns Around and Watches Eurydice”, premiered in 1972 at the Henie Onstad Art Centre outside Oslo. For the American bass player Barre Phillipps we wrote his “Concerto per violbasso e orchestra” (1973). His violin concerto “Undisonus” received the prize “Work of the Year” by the Society of Norwegian Composers. He has composed five symphonies, several works for solo instruments with orchestra, two operas and a large number of contemporary works with participation of jazz musicians.

Terje Rypdal’s compositions witness his versatile musical work, his rich imagination and solid knowledge. One can find poetic moments with an almost impressionistic colour as well as constellations of sound with elements from jazz, late romanticism and avantgardism. In addition to his large production of modern art music he has also a great number of jazz and rock compositions.

with courtesy of the Music Information Centre Norway.

Photos related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album  photo (A’ Side)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the artist :

Image result for terje rypdal

TERJE RYPDAL 1 (2).png

Links related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”Video file link on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Download Link on “Opium Hum”Blog

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Review on “Paste Magazine”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Apple Music”

Links related to the artist :

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Discogs”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “ECM Records”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on IMDb

Terje Rypdal on “Notes On The Road” Terje Rypdal’s Odyssey: New York and Beyond the Infinite An interview with Terje Rypdal from 2012 by Gideon Egger and Ying Zhu

Terje Rypdal Shows on “Mixcloud”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Deezer”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Apple Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Getty Images”

 

 

 

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change”

John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

John Mayall (Macclesfield, Cheshire, U.K.)

“Track”

“The Laws Must Change” (written by John Mayall) A1 track (opening track) included on the live album “Turning Point”

Album :

“Turning Point”  released on Polydor Records (583571) in October 1969

The Turning Point is a live album by John Mayall, featuring British blues music recorded at a concert at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East on 12 July 1969.

Originally released with a lyric insert.

The album was produced by John Mayall, who also designed the packaging and was the album’s art director. The recording engineer was Eddie Kramer, who had engineered Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, among others.

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

John Almond – flute, saxophone, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, mouth percussion

Jon Mark – acoustic guitar

John Mayall – guitar, harmonica, keyboards, tambourine, vocals, slide guitar, mouth percussion

Steve Thompson – bass guitar

The performers on the album were Mayall on vocals, harmonica, a slide and a Fender Telecaster guitar, a tambourine, and mouth percussion, Jon Mark on acoustic guitar, Steve Thompson on bass, and Johnny Almond on tenor and alto saxophones, flutes, and mouth percussion. All the songs on the album were written or co-written by John Mayall. Thompson co-wrote CaliforniaThoughts About Roxanne and Don’t Waste My Time.Another track, “I’m Gonna Fight For You, J.B.,” is a tribute to the American blues guitarist J. B. Lenoir who died in 1967 and who had a deep influence on Mayall (this was Mayall’s second such tribute to the musician; “The Death of J.B. Lenoir” appeared on his earlier Crusade album). Two concerts took place, on 11 and 12 July. All tracks are from the second gig.

Credits :

Bob Gordon – photography

Suha Gur – mastering

Eddie Kramer – engineer, audio engineer

Bill Levenson – reissue producer

John Mayall – liner notes, artwork, art direction, design, photography, audio production, telecaster

Monique McGuffin – production coordination

Neil Slaven – liner notes

Tapani Tapanainen – photography

Larry La Fond – photography

Chris Welch – liner notes

Barry Wentzell – photography

Zill – photography

Companies : 

Manufactured By – Polydor Records Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Polydor Ltd.

Made By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Published By – St. George Music

Recorded At – Fillmore East

Lacquer Cut At – Phonodisc Ltd.

Label: Made in England, St. George Music, ® 1969

Track-list :

01. The Laws Must Change – 7:21
02. Saw Mill Gulch Road – 4:39
03. I’m Gonna Fight For You J.B. – 5:27
04. So Hard To Share – 7:05
05. California – 9:30
06. Thoughts About Roxanne  – 8:20
07. Room To Move – 5:03

Bonus tracks (2001 reissue) :

  1. “Sleeping By Her Side” – 5.10
  2. “Don’t Waste My Time” (Mayall, Thompson) – 4.54
  3. “Can’t Sleep This Night” – 6.19

JOHN MAYALL TRACKLIST 1 (2)

Lyrics :

The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
But while the law is standing
You gotta open up your minds
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
But you gotta see both sides
You’ll find yourself in jail ‘fore long
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they’re only doin’ a gig
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they are only doin’ a gig
Gotta try and take the time
To figure out how the issue got that big
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Don’t throw rocks at policemen
But get the knots of law untied
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
The laws must change one day
But it’s goin’ to take some time
Songwriters: John Mayall
Information related to the album/artist/track :
“All Music”
As the elder statesman of British blues, it is John Mayall’s lot to be more renowned as a bandleader and mentor than as a performer in his own right. Throughout the ’60s, his band the Bluesbreakers acted as a finishing school for the leading British blues-rock musicians of the era. Guitarists Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor joined his band in a remarkable succession in the mid-’60s, honing their chops with Mayall before going on to join Cream, Fleetwood Mac, and the Rolling Stones, respectively. John McVie and Mick Fleetwood, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser (of Free), John Almond, and Jon Mark also played and recorded with Mayall for varying lengths of times in the ’60s.

Mayall’s personnel has tended to overshadow his own considerable abilities. The multi-instrumentalist was adept in bringing out the best in his younger charges (Mayall was in his thirties by the time the Bluesbreakers began to make a name for themselves). Doing his best to provide a context in which they could play Chicago-style electric blues, Mayall was never complacent, writing most of his own material revamping his lineup with unnerving regularity, and constantly experimenting and stretching with the basic blues form on groundbreaking recordings such as 1967’s The Blues Alone, on which he played all instruments save for percussion — provided by Keef Hartley — and 1969’s best-selling The Turning Point, a stellar, drum-less unplugged helping of acoustic blues that netted him his biggest hit, the single “Room to Move.” Likewise, 1972’s Jazz Blues Fusion moved the other direction, as it featured Mayall in the company of trumpeter Blue Mitchell, saxophonist Clifford Solomon, guitarist Freddy Robinson, and bassist Larry Taylor. Mayall’s output has been prolific. He has introduced dozens of instrumentalists to the music-listening public including guitarists Coco Montoya and Harvey Mandel, and violinist Don “Sugarcane” Harris. When Clapton joined the Bluesbreakers in 1965, Mayall had already been recording for a year, and performing professionally long before that. Originally based in Manchester, Mayall moved to London in 1963 on the advice of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, who thought a living could be made playing the blues in the bigger city. Tracing a path through his various lineups of the ’60s is a daunting task. At least 15 different editions of the Bluesbreakers were in existence from January 1963 through mid-1970. Some notable musicians (like guitarist Davy Graham, Mick Fleetwood, and Jack Bruce) passed through for little more than a cup of coffee; Mayall’s longest-running employee, bassist John McVie, lasted about four years. The Bluesbreakers, like Fairport Convention or the Fall, were more a concept than an ongoing core. Mayall, too, had the reputation of being a difficult and demanding employer, willing to give musicians their walking papers as his music evolved, although he also imparted invaluable schooling to them while the associations lasted.Mayall recorded his debut single in early 1964; he made his first album, a live affair, near the end of the year. At this point the Bluesbreakers had a more pronounced R&B influence than would be exhibited on their most famous recordings, somewhat in the mold of younger combos like the Animals and Rolling Stones, but the Bluesbreakers would take a turn for the purer with the recruitment of Eric Clapton in the spring of 1965. Clapton had left the Yardbirds in order to play straight blues, and the Bluesbreakers allowed him that freedom (or stuck to well-defined restrictions, depending upon your viewpoint). Clapton began to inspire reverent acclaim as one of Britain’s top virtuosos, as reflected in the famous “Clapton is God” graffiti that appeared in London in the mid-’60s.

In professional terms, though, 1965 wasn’t the best of times for the group, which had been dropped by Decca. Clapton even left the group for a few months for an odd trip to Greece, leaving Mayall to straggle on with various fill-ins, including Peter Green. Clapton did return in late 1965, around the time an excellent blues-rock single, “I’m Your Witchdoctor” (with searing sustain-laden guitar riffs), was issued on Immediate. By early 1966, the band was back on Decca, and recorded its landmark Bluesbreakers LP. This was the album that, with its clean, loud, authoritative licks, firmly established Clapton as a guitar hero, on both reverent covers of tunes by the likes of Otis Rush and Freddie King and decent originals by Mayall himself. The record was also an unexpected commercial success, making the Top Ten in Britain. From that point on, in fact, Mayall became one of the first rock musicians to depend primarily upon the LP market; he recorded plenty of singles throughout the ’60s, but none of them came close to becoming a hit.

Clapton left the Bluesbreakers in mid-1966 to form Cream with Jack Bruce, who had played with Mayall briefly in late 1965. Mayall turned quickly to Peter Green, who managed the difficult feat of stepping into Clapton’s shoes and gaining respect as a player of roughly equal imagination and virtuosity, although his style was quite distinctly his own. Green recorded one LP with Mayall, A Hard Road, and several singles, sometimes writing material and taking some respectable lead vocals. Green’s talents, like those of Clapton, were too large to be confined by sideman status, and in mid-1967 he left to form a successful band of his own, Fleetwood Mac.

Mayall then enlisted 19-year-old Mick Taylor; remarkably, despite the consecutive departures of two star guitarists, Mayall maintained a high level of popularity. The late ’60s were also a time of considerable experimentation for the Bluesbreakers, who moved into a form of blues-jazz-rock fusion with the addition of a horn section, and then retreated into mellower, acoustic-oriented music. Mick Taylor, the last of the famous triumvirate of Mayall-bred guitar heroes, left in mid-1969 to join the Rolling Stones. Yet in a way Mayall was thriving more than ever, as the U.S. market, which had been barely aware of him in the Clapton era, was beginning to open up for his music. In fact, at the end of the ’60s, Mayall moved to Los Angeles. Released in 1969, The Turning Point, a live, all-acoustic affair, was a commercial and artistic high point.

In America at least, Mayall continued to be pretty popular in the early ’70s. His band was as unstable as ever; at various points some American musicians flitted in and out of the Bluesbreakers, including Harvey Mandel, Canned Heatbassist Larry Taylor, and Don “Sugarcane” Harris. Although he’s released numerous albums since, and remains a prodigiously busy and reasonably popular live act, his post-1970 output generally hasn’t matched the quality of his ’60s work. Following collaborations with an unholy number of guest celebrities, in the early ’80s he re-teamed with a couple of his more renowned vets, John McVie and Mick Taylor, for a tour, which was chronicled by Great American Music’s Blues Express, released in 2010. The ’60s albums are what you want, though over the past decades, there’s little doubt that Mayall has done a great deal to popularize the blues all over the globe. Continuing to record and tour into his eighties, Mayall released A Special Life, recorded at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood and featuring a guest spot by singer and accordion player C.J. Chenier, in 2014. The album was universally celebrated as one of his best.

A live archival recording of the Green, McVie, Fleetwood-era Bluesbreakers was released in April as Live in 1967. Meanwhile, the bandleader, his co-producer Eric Corne, and his seven-year old group — Rocky Athas, guitar; Greg Rzab, bass; Jay Davenport, drums — were in the studio. They emerged with Find a Way to Care, a set that showcased Mayall’s highly underrated keyboard playing on a set of originals and vintage covers including Percy Mayfield’s “The River’s Invitation.” The album was released in the late summer of 2015. Talk About That, Mayall’s second album for Forty Below, arrived in late 2017.

In the spring of 2018, at the age of 85, Mayall had to cancel a U.S. tour due to a nasty bout with pneumonia. That summer, sufficiently recovered, he hit the recording studio and emerged with the full-length Nobody Told Me in the late fall. Its first single, “Distant Lonesome Train,” was co-written with Joe Bonamassa (who also played guitar on it and another track). Other guests included Steve Van Zandt, Todd Rundgren, Alex Lifeson, Larry McCray, and Carolyn Wonderland. Mayall, ever the road warrior, embarked on a world tour after the album’s release that continued into 2019.

Photos related to the album/track :

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album cover photo (front)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album photo (A’ Side)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo 

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JOHN MAYALL 2 (2)

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JOHN MAYALL 1 (2)

John Mayall Recording Saturday Cub at the BBC Theater 1969, Mini Poster

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Ambient/Electronic/Experimental/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen”

Ambient/Electronic/Experimental/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Michael Rother (Hamburg, Germany)

Instrumental Music

Title Track

“Flammende Herzen” (written by Michael Rother) A1 (opening track) included on the album “Flammende Herzen”, his debut album as a solo artist.

Released on Polydor Records (2372 112) in March 1977

Line-up/Credits :

Michael Rother – Guitar, Electric Piano, Bass, Synthesizer, Organ, Electric Percussion, Producer

Jaki Liebezeit – Drums

Conny Plank – Producer, Engineering

Ann Weitz – Front Cover Photograph

Christian Rabe – Back Photo

Rike – Design

Mastered By  – G. F. Pfanz

Track List :

1.Flammende Herzen (07:03)
2.Zyklodrom (09:36)
3.Karussell (05:22)
4.Feuerland (07:06)
5.Zeni (05:09)

Bonustracks:
6.Flammende Herzen – Film Remix [1993]
7.Vorbei (Flammende Herzen – Chill Remix) [1993]

Member of :
Hallogallo 2010, Harmonia, Kraftwerk, NEU!, Spirits of Sound
Related Artists :
Herbert Grönemeyer, Jaki Liebezeit, Moebius, Conny Plank

Michael Rother (born 2 September 1950 in Hamburg, Germany) is a German experimental musician, best known for being a founding member of the band Neu!, and as a short-lived member of the band Kraftwerk.

Michael Rother was born in Germany in 1950. In the late ’60s, he played for a group called Spirits of Sound and also Wolfgang Flür. The latter group would later become Kraftwerk; Rother also played with Kraftwerk in 1971. That same year he went on to the band NEU! He recorded three albums with them during his four-year tenure. He also worked with Harmonia (with whom he released two albums) starting in 1973, running concurrently with several of his years in NEU! In 1976, he recorded with Brian Eno. The recording was released in 1997 under the moniker Harmonia 76. 1977 saw the release of Rother’s first solo album, entitled, Flammende Herzen. The following year Rother released his second solo album, Sterntaler. He followed that one up in 1979 with Katzenmusik. His next solo release would not be seen until 1982. This time the title was Fernwärme. The following year saw Rother releasing Lust. Süssherz und Tiefenschärfe, his sixth solo album, would be released in 1985. 1987 saw the follow-up to that one, it was entitled Traumreisen. His next solo album was not released until 1996. That one was called Esparanza.

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Album cover photo (front)

MICHAEL ROTHER FLAMMEND HERZEN 2

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Album photo (A’ Side)

MICHAEL ROTHER FLAMMENDE HERZEN 2

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Video file link on YouTube

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Spotify

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Discogs

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Facebook

Michael Rother Artist’s Homepage

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Perfect Sound Forever Online Magazine

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Wire

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Gigwise

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Apple Music

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Google Play

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Download Link on Krautrock Maniac Blog

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Download Link on Opium Hum Blog

 

 

Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) Cream – “Deserted Cities Of The Heart”

Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Cream (London, U.K.) Blues/Psychedelic Rock band

“Deserted Cities Of The Heart” (written by Bruce, Brown) B5 (closing track) included on the album “Wheels Of Fire” 

Released on Polydor Records ( 582 031/2) in August 1968

Line-up/Credits :

Jack Bruce – Vocals, Lead Vocals, Bass, Cello, Harmonica, Calliope, Acoustic Guitar, Recorder
Ginger Baker – Drums, Percussion, Bells, Glockenspiel, Timpani, Spoken Word On “Pressed Rat And Warthog”
Eric Clapton – Guitar, Vocals

With

Felix Pappalardi – Viola, Bells, Organ, Trumpet, Tonette

Tom Dowd – recording engineer on disc one

Adrian Barber – recording engineer on disc one, re-mix engineer on disc two

Joseph M. Palmaccio – digital remastering

Martin Sharp – art

Jim Marshall – photography

Lyrics :

On these streets where the time had died
The golden treat you never tried
In times of old, in days gone by
If I could catch your dancing eye
It was on the way
On the road to dreams, yea
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams, yea
The street is cold, its trees are gone
The story’s told, the dark has won
Once we set sail to catch a star
We had to fail, it was too far
It was on the way
On the road to dreams, yea
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams, yea
I’ve felt the wind shout like a drum
You said, “My friend, love’s end has come
It couldn’t last, had to stop
You drained it all to the last drop”
It was on the way
On the road to dreams, yea
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams, yea
On these dark streets, the sun is black
The winter life is coming back
On these dark streets, it’s cold inside
There’s no retreat from time that’s died
It was on the way
On the road to dreams
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams
Yea, yea, yea, yea, yea, yea, yea, yea
Now my heart’s drowned in no love streams, yea
Now my heart’s drowned in no love
Songwriters: Jack Bruce / Peter Constantine Brown
Cream – “Wheels Of Fire” Album cover photo (front)
cream wheels of fire 6 (2)
Cream – “Wheels Of Fire” Album photo (B Side)
cream wheels of fire 7