Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks) Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales” Track’s video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

Terje Rypdal ( Oslo, Norway)

Terje Rypdal Artist’s photo

Image result for terje rypdal

Related Groups :

Dream (6), Jan Garbarek Quartet, Min Bul, Morning Glory (2), Terje Rypdal Trio, Terje Rypdals Orchestra,The Baden-Baden Free Jazz Orchestra, The Chasers, The Esoteric Circle, The George Russell Sextet,The Hugger Muggers, The New Eternal Rhythm Orchestra, The Terje Rypdal Group, The Tomasz Stanko Septet, The Vanguards

Track :

“Dead Man’s Tales” A1 track included on the album “Bleak House”

Album :

“Bleak House”, released on Polydor Records (184 189) in 1968

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Recorded on Oct 7th, 8th and 22nd 1968, at Roger Arnhoff Lydstudio, Oslo, Norway.

A3: “A free form composition based on an idea by T. Rypdal”. The composer credited for B1 is “xxx”.

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

C- Terje Rypdal / guitar, flute, vocals, producer

With:

Christian Reim / piano, organ (3,5)
Carl Magnus Neumann / alto sax & flute (2,5)
Hans Knudsen / baritone sax (2,5)
Jan Garbarek / tenor sax, flute & bells (2-5)
Frode Thingnæs / trombone & tuba (4,5)
Kjell Haugen / trombone (2,4,5)
Tore Nilsen / trombone (2)
Øivind Westby / trombone (2)
Ditlef Eckhoff / trumpet (2)
Jarl Johansen / trumpet (2-5)
Kåre Furuholmen / trumpet (2,4)
Frøydis Ree Hauge / horn (5,6)
Odd Ulleberg / horn (5,6)
Knut Riisnæs / tenor sax (3), arranger & conductor (2,4,5)
Terje Venaas / bass (2-5)
Tom Karlsen / drums (1)
Jon Christensen / drums (2-5)arl Magnus Neumann (tracks: A2 to B2)

Arranged By – Knut Riisnæs (tracks: A2, B1, B2)

Composed By – Terje Rypdal

Engineer [Recording] – Roger Arnhoff

Photography By – Sohlberg Foto

Producer – Terje Rypdal

Recording Supervisor – Odd Løken

Track-list :

1. Dead Man´s Tale (7:03)
2. Wes (4:15)
3. Winter Serenade (6:04):
– a) Falling Snow
– b) Snow Storm
– c) Melting Snow
4. Bleak House (7:05)
5. Sonority (5:21)
6. A Feeling Of Harmony (2:29)

Total time 33:05

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover/track-list photo (back)

Information related to the artist :

“Wikipedia”

Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. He has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as “N3”.

Rypdal was born in Oslo, the son of a composer and orchestra leader. He studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek’s group and later George Russell’s sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany, in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal’s guitar).

His compositions “Last Nite” and “Mystery Man” were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name.

Rypdal was married (1969–1985) to the Norwegian singer Inger Lise Andersen/Rypdal, and they had two children, the auditor Daniel (1970) and the electronica musician Marius (1977). Rypdal was married again in 1988 to Elin Kristin Bergei (born 28 May 1955). They have two children Ane Izabel (1988) and the guitarist Jakob Rypdal (1989). They (as of 2013) live in Tresfjord.

“All Music”

Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal has an instantly recognizable, difficult to peg style, both an as ensemble player and as a soloist. He has directly or indirectly influenced virtually every one of his countrymen who followed him on the instrument. He is also a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and, perhaps most importantly, a world-class composer. He has written six symphonies, numerous chamber works, and sonatas.

Rypdal was born in Oslo in 1947, the son of a conductor and clarinetist for a military band. He began his musical studies on the piano by the age of five, and at eight added trumpet. He abandoned both instruments at age 13 for the guitar. On his chosen instrument, Rypdal was self-taught. Between 1962 and 1967 he was part of the Vanguards, a Norwegian instrumental rock group modeled on the Ventures and the British Shadows, but all that changed when he heard Jimi Hendrix for the first time. Rypdal started the psychedelic rock band Dream in late 1967; they recorded their sole album, Get Dreamy, for Polydor in 1968. That same year he formed another band with saxophonist Jan Garbarek and drummer Jon Christensen, and released his first ambitious meld of rock, classical, and jazz with Bleak House for Polydor under his own name.

Rypdal originally attended the Technical University in Trondheim to become an electrical engineer, but left to study musicology at the University of Oslo. He later attended the Music Conservatory in Oslo (later renamed the Norwegian State Academy of Music) from 1970-1972, where he studied with composers Finn Mortensen and George Russell. Rypdal was part of Garbarek’s quartet for Afric Pepperbird, the saxophonist’s debut for ECM in 1970. He made his debut as a composer with Eternal Circulation in 1971, which was performed with by the Garbarek Quartet and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Rypdal also played with Russell in concert and in the studio, resulting in several offerings including George Russell Presents the Esoteric Circle, and Electric Sonata for Souls Loved by Nature, both issued in 1971. He appeared on Garbarek’s sophomore ECM date Sart, and recorded his self-titled debut for the label (he has been there ever since) that same year. Some of his sidemen for the date included Garbarek, bassist Arild Andersen, and pianist Bobo Stenson. This album walked a generous line between free jazz, progressive, psychedelic rock, and more avant-garde classical music. It established Rypdal as a composer and guitarist throughout Europe.

In 1972, he appeared on the live, star-studded session that was released as Morning Glory in 1973 on Antilles; the other players included John Surman, John Marshall, Chris Laurence, John Taylor, and Malcolm Griffiths. In 1973, Rypdal recorded with Russell again; the ensuing offering was entitled Listen to the Silence. He also composed Concerto for Violbasso and Orchestra for Barre Phillips. He released two of his own albums for ECM in 1974, Whenever I Seem to Be Far Away and What Comes After.

The year 1975 proved monumental for Rypdal. His Symphony No. 1 was commissioned by Norwegian Television, and he released the widely acclaimed double-album Odyssey, which was regarded as the pinnacle of jazz-rock fusion. The Odyssey Band toured the globe and was especially successful in the U.S.A. In 1976, Rypdal did a turnabout, and released the musically impressionistic After the Rain, on which he performed all instruments. He also recorded with Russell but went back to his ensemble work with 1978’s Waves. Rypdal finished the ’70s with a trio date, co-billed with collaborators bassist Miroslav Vitous and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

He commenced the new decade with Descendre, a trio session with Christensen and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Rypdal played keyboards and flute in addition to guitar. To Be Continued, the second album with Vitous and DeJohnette, appeared in 1981. After touring and an extended break during which he worked on his classical composing, Rypdal emerged with his first duet album for ECM, the vanguard classical, electro-acoustic work, Eos in 1984. The guitarist returned to a trio format for The Chaser and Blue in 1985 and 1986, respectively. The latter year also saw the release of a 1970 date he and Garbarek had recorded with the George Russell Sextet, A Trip to Prillargui, released on Soul Note. Rypdal also recorded his groundbreaking modern classical work, Undisonus in 1986 (though it wouldn’t see release for four more years) and composed two more symphonies. In 1989 he released The Singles Collection, a jazz-rock quartet date that focused on exceedingly brief compositions.

The album, Undisonus for Violin and Orchestra / Ineo for Choir and Chamber Orchestra, was finally released in 1990 to massive critical acclaim, and received the “Work of the Year” prize from the Society of Norwegian Composers. It was followed by the long-form work Q.E.D. in 1993, and the jazz-cum-neo-classical fusion set If Mountains Could Sing in 1995. Also that year, Rypdal recorded as a session player with pianist and composer Ketil Bjørnstad’s group on The Sea, and as part of Surman’s ensemble on Nordic Quartet, both issued on ECM. In 1997, the guitarist issued Skywards, a sextet date that walked the line between formal jazz composition and free improvisation. He finished the decade with Bjørnstad on The Sea II, and a guitar duet recording with Ronni Le Tekrø entitled Tekro II on the Grappa label, both in 1998.

Rypdal began the 21st century busier than ever. In addition to receiving commissions to compose, he was part of Markus Stockhausen’s ensemble on Karta, and saw his own Double Concerto/Fifth Symphony issued by ECM. In 2002, his five-movement work, Lux Æterna for soprano, chamber ensemble, organ, trumpet, and guitar, a second album with Tekrø entitled The Radiosong, and his Sonata Op. 73/Nimbus Op. 76 with violinist Birgitte Stærnes, were all released on different labels. In 2006, Vossabrygg, a live sextet date from 2003 inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew group and early Weather Report, was released by ECM. The date also featured an appearance by Rypdal’s son Marius on turntables and samplers. Life in Leipzig, a duet offering with Bjørnstad, followed in 2008. The large-ensemble tribute to film noir, Crime Scene, appeared in 2010, as did Very Much Alive, a mammoth six-disc concert run by jazz drummer Paolo Vinaccia that featured the guitarist Ståle Storløkken and Mikkelborg. After several festival appearances, the completion of commissions, and some time off, Rypdal returned to recording with 2013’s The Melodic Warrior and large-scale ensemble work conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

“Progarchives”

Born 23 August 1947 (Oslo, Norway)

He is known as one of the leading modern jazz guitarists in Europe. At the same time he is regarded to be an outstanding composer of contemporary art music. Rypdal has has a multifarious musical career since he started his pop band “The Vanguards” in the 1960’ies. He later started up “Dream” where his interest for jazz was awakened. In 1969 he joined the Jan Garbarek Quartet. At the same time he even played in George Russell’s Sextet and big band. Rypdal has up through the years composed numerous jazz compositions for own as well as other groups.

Terje Rypdal played the piano from he was five years old, and started up with guitar from the age of 13. As a guitarist he is self-taught. He has studied musicology at the University in Oslo. During the years 1970-72 he studied composition with Finn Mortensen at the Music Conservatory in Oslo (Later the Norwegian State Academy of Music). He has also studied improvisation with George Russell.

As a composer Rypdal received his first impulses from Ligeti, Penderecki and Mahler and he soon developed his own style. His début as a composer was with “Eternal Circulation” (1971), performed with Jan Garbarek Quartet and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Among his works can be mentioned: Symphony No. 1 (1975) commissioned by the Norwegian Television. His opera “Orfeo Turns Around and Watches Eurydice”, premiered in 1972 at the Henie Onstad Art Centre outside Oslo. For the American bass player Barre Phillipps we wrote his “Concerto per violbasso e orchestra” (1973). His violin concerto “Undisonus” received the prize “Work of the Year” by the Society of Norwegian Composers. He has composed five symphonies, several works for solo instruments with orchestra, two operas and a large number of contemporary works with participation of jazz musicians.

Terje Rypdal’s compositions witness his versatile musical work, his rich imagination and solid knowledge. One can find poetic moments with an almost impressionistic colour as well as constellations of sound with elements from jazz, late romanticism and avantgardism. In addition to his large production of modern art music he has also a great number of jazz and rock compositions.

with courtesy of the Music Information Centre Norway.

Photos related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album  photo (A’ Side)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the artist :

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TERJE RYPDAL 1 (2).png

Links related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”Video file link on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Download Link on “Opium Hum”Blog

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Review on “Paste Magazine”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Apple Music”

Links related to the artist :

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Discogs”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “ECM Records”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on IMDb

Terje Rypdal on “Notes On The Road” Terje Rypdal’s Odyssey: New York and Beyond the Infinite An interview with Terje Rypdal from 2012 by Gideon Egger and Ying Zhu

Terje Rypdal Shows on “Mixcloud”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Deezer”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Apple Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Getty Images”

 

 

 

Folk/Progressive Rock Norway 1970s (Tracks) Folque – “Harpa”

Folk/Progressive Rock Norway 1970s (Tracks)

Folque (Oslo, Norway)

Traditional song, the Folque’s version of the song is based on the Scottish song “The Cruel Sister (Child Nr. 10) “, the Norwegian song “Horpa” and the Scottish ballad “ballade Riddles Wisely Expounded (Child Nr. 1)”.

“Harpa” A6 (traditional, arranged by Folque) track included on the album “Folque”

Released on Philips Records (6317 025) in 1974

Line-up/Credits :

Lisa Helljesen: vocals
Jørn Jensen: vocals, guitar, dulcimer
Trond Villa: fele
Morten Bing: guitar, mandolin
Eilif Amundsen: banjo, bass, guitar
Trond Øverland: bass, piano

Producer – Øystein Sunde

Photography By [Foto], Layout – Macro Foto

Photography By [Foto], Layout [Macro Foto] – Bjørn Morisse, Terje Berntsen

Lacquer Cut By – Ivar Finsen

Management [Road Manager] – Espen Løvstad

Engineer [Teknikere] – H. P. Danielsen, Inge Holst-Jacobsen

Recorded At – Rosenborg Studio

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Phonogram A/S

Copyright (c) – Phonogram A/S

Lacquer Cut At – Rosenborg Studio

Pressed By – Musikkindustri A/S

Track List :

1. Skjøn jomfru (4:26)
2. Ravnene (2:31)
3. Springar (1:17)
4. Sjugur og trollbrura (2:37)
5. Nissedans (2:25)
6. Harpa (4:49)
7. Sinclairvise (3:24)
8. Reinlender (1:57)
9. Alison Gross (3:49)
10. Steffa går til Selfjord (3:50)
11. Reven og bjørnen (3:22)
12. Heimatlåta (1:42)

Lyrics :

Det bodde en bonde ved en strand
Harpa toner var og fin
To fagre døtre hadde han
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Den eldste til den yngre sa
Harpa toner var og fin
La oss ned til elva dra
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Den yngste gikk føre som en sol
Harpa toner var og fin
Den eldste etter som orm i jord
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Den yngste satte seg på en stein
Harpa toner var og fin
Den eldste dyttet, hun var ikke sein.
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Hun strakte ut sin hvite hand
Harpa toner var og fin.
Og ropte søster hjelp meg iland
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Da hvis jeg ikke hjelper deg
Harpa toner var og fin
Så vil din kjæreste ekte meg
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Det var to gjetere på den strand
Harpa toner var og fin
Og de så liket som fløt i land
Fa la la la la la la la la la
De tok fra hennes kropp et ben
Harpa toner var og fin
Og lagde av det en harpe ven
Fa la la la la la la la la la
De tok to lokker av hennes hår
Harpa toner var og fin
Og harpa gyldne strenger får
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Til søsterens bryllup ble harpa bragt
Harpa toner var og fin
Og på en strubbe der ble den lagt
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Og det var senere på denne kveld
Harpa toner var og fin
At harpa spilte av seg selv
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Da den første strengen lød
Harpa toner var og fin
Den fortalte om brudens onde dåd
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Da den andre strengen slo
Harpa toner var og fin
Bruden som forstenet sto
Fa la la la la la la la la la
Songwriters: traditional scottish

Folque is a Norwegian folk rock band founded in 1973 by Morten Bing, Jørn Jensen (musician), Eilif Amundsen, Lisa Helljesen, Espen Løvstad, Trond Øverland, and Trond Villa. In 1972 a subset of the band was initially named «Brød & Vin» (Bread & wine), they changed the name to Folque in the spring of 1973 after adding members and traditional instruments to the ensemble.

The band was dissolved in 1984, but reunited in 1994 and in 2004 for playing live. Folque is re-established in 2014 with Lisa Helljesen as lead singer.

Their musical style is linked to Malicorne in France and to Steeleye Span in the UK.

Most of the discography is difficult to find, as only the first three albums were re-released on CD.

This Norwegian folk outfit started out in the early 70s mixing acoustic instruments (fiddle, mandolin, banjo and piano) with the electric guitar, bass and keyboards. They created an earthy music made up of playful, catchy melodies with male/female vocal interplay. Despite important personnel changes over the years (their first-rate lead female singer was replaced, among others), they have managed to remain true to their sound and have churned out over ten fine albums between 1974 and 1998. In 2004 they reunited to play a gig at the Norsk Folkemuseum and don’t seem to show any signs of slowing down.

Their highest rated album is their third, entitled “Vardøger”, closely followed by their first two, “Folque” and “Kjempene på Dovrefjell” released in the mid-70s, and by “Fredløs” and “Sort messe” released in the early 80s. Their material is pure, often foot-stomping folk with Norwegian vocals. Despite the mostly minor keys, it is fresh and exhilirating and dons some wonderful arrangements.

Highly recommended to fans of MALICORNE, THE POGUES, KEBNEKAISE and GRYPHON as well as those heavily into Nordic and Irish folk. A good introduction is the recent live sampler “Stormkast”.

Folque formed in Oslo in 1972 with the aim of making a Norwegian form of folk-rock, using guitars and banjos instead of the traditional treatment with Hardanger fiddle or solo vocals. Their first album, ‘Folque’ (1974), also included adaptations of two Scottish folk songs (among them “Allison Gross” in a similar arrangement to the 1973 Steeleye Span version, although with Norwegian lyrics), but for the future they stuck to Scandinavian material. For this reason, ‘Kjempene På Dovrefjell’ (1975) and ‘Vardøger’ (1977) are usually considered their best albums, offering great insight into Norwegian folklore, i.e. medieval ballads, old Norse poems set to music, fiddle instrumentals and traditional dance music. Their musical ability is impeccable, highlighting fiddle, mandolin, dulcimer and electric guitars. The arrangements always function well, meaning that the bass and drums do not disturb the original rhythm and rhymes. On top of this, Lisa Helljesen had a clear and strong voice (a bit similar to Maddy Prior in Steeleye Span and Mandy Morton in The Spriguns), perfectly suitable to the music. There is no better starting place than ‘Vardøger’, where their own blend of folk-rock was fully developed.

After some personnel changes, Folque signed to the political left-wing label Mai after their Philips contract expired. Jørn Jensen and Trond Villa were later involved in Kong Lavring and the group Folk & Rackare (along with Swedish musicians). ‘Dans, Dans Olav Liljekrans’ (1978) revealed the new line-up to be as musically competent as the previous one, but the new female vocalist Jenn E. Mortensen had a rougher voice (and a strong North-Norwegian regional accent) that might be disturbing to those who dislike her more aggressive attitude (less suitable to Folque’s music, in my opinion). ‘Fredløs’ was a transitional record with a wider musical span than their previous records. Their last two original albums contained increasing numbers of self-penned compositions, ‘Sort Messe’ (1982) being dominated by the competent songwriting of Morten Bing.

Folque were undoubtedly the most influential Norwegian folk-rock band and arguably among the best in Europe, on a par with Malicorne in France or Ougenweide in Germany.

Folque : the history of a Norwegian folk rock group

Back in 1972 I was one of many young people playing strange songs on minor-tuned guitars at the Folk Clubs of Oslo. Usually with a friend called Eilif Amundsen. In the spring I was asked to participate on an anti-EEC-record. I got together with a bunch of pals, and played my own song “Si ja til selvstendighet (Yes, to independence!). Afterwards I toured along the southern coast and became acquainted with another singer/guitarist, JørnJensen. After the tour I joined Eilif and his brother and went with them to London, where I met a couple of other Norwegians, Lars Helljesen and Espen Løvstad.

That was the beginning of Folque.

I the fall Jørn, Eilif and I started a group. We needed a singer and asked Lars’ sister, Lisa. The result was the folk group “Brødog Vin” (Bread and Wine). We were a strange musical mixture: Eilif and I played American Old Time (in the New Lost City Ramblers tradition), Jørn played Jansch-style guitar, and Lisa was a committed fan of the American singer Melanie. But we rehearsed some songs and got our first gigs

In the spring 1973 we had begun to develop our own style: Translated English folk songs, traditional Norwegian songs, guitar, banjo, mandolin, and dulcimer. We changed our name to FOLQUE and were joined by Espen (who later on was to become our road manager) on percussion, Trond Øverland on bass-guitar and Trond Villa on fiddle. Jørn bought a Telecaster, and suddenly we were no longer an acoustic folk group, but an electric folkrockband.

Early in 1974 we made our first TV-appearance in “Flimra“. Later the same spring we recorded a demo in the basement-studio of Øystein Sunde, who brought the tape to the record-company Phonogram. A contract! The first album Folque was recorded and released the same fall. Øystein produced, and a drummer joined us in the studio. The album was well received, and we even had a radio-hit with a traditional dance tune, “Reinlender“.

But as soon as the record was finished, the band was beginning to fall to pieces. Personal and musical disagreements led to Jørn’s departure, and Lars Helljesen joined us as new guitarist.

With Lars and his Stratocaster, a permanent drummer became necessary, and before we recorded the second album, Morten Jakobsen had joined us on drums. We now were a full-fledged folkrock band! In the summer 1975 we played the Forum Festival in Arendal and the Festigavla Festival in Ålesund.

Kjempene på Dovrefjell (The Giants in the Dovre Mountains) was recorded in the fall and was perhaps our best album ever. The same fall we appeared in

Soon after Trond Ø. left us, going to India, and Eilif changed from banjo to bass a special television-program, “Stev og synthesiser”.

 The spring 1976 we toured in Trøndelag and in Western Norway, and in the summer we appeared at the Västervik Festival in Sweden. In the fall we recorded our third album, Vardøger, but soon after, Lisa and Trond V. also left the group. The remaining members wanted to continue the group, but this was not easy without our “stars”, Lisa and Trond, but Lars was able to find replacements for both.

First a new vocalist, JennMortensen, and then a new fiddler, Øyvind Rauset, joined in the spring 1977. That summer we played at Kalvøya, the biggest festival in Norway at the time, and at the Horten Festival.

In 1978 we left Phonogram to join up with the left-wing record company Mai. They released Dansdans, Olav Liljekrans (Dance, dance, Olav Liljekrans) the same year. The title track was maybe our most popular song, but the album was the worst we ever made. The critics blamed it on the new members of the band, but it was the producer who stunk.

Eilif had left the band in the spring 1978 and new bassist was Per Vestaby. With this line-up we played the Television-show “Musikalskgjestebud” in the fall, and the Troilltampen Festival next summer. We made a second album on Mai, Fredløs  (Outlaw), in 1980. On this album Jenn and Øyvind got a chance to show that they were excellent musicians. Arvid Esperø produced the album and was an inspiration to work with.

1980 saw new changes in the band, a new drummer, Pål Søvik, and then a new bassist, Roald Thommesen. We left Mai and signed up with a new record company, Talent Records. On the next album, Landetditt (Your Homeland), Øyvind’scompositions and synthesisers held a central position.

he last chapter in the history of Folque started when Øyvind left in 1981. Without a fiddler, Lars’ guitar and my mandolin took the lead, and did quite well. Sort Messe (Witches’ Mass) was recorded next year. This album was mostly Lars’ and mine compositions and my lyrics, less traditional folk. Arvid was back as producer, and the result was in our opinion an excellent, but rock-oriented record.
In the summer 1984 we were asked to play at a festival in Denmark. At that moment we had almost disbanded, but we said yes. Øyvindjoined us, Trond Ø. was back on bass, and the concert on the Midt-Fyn Festival was one of our best ever. Luckily, it was recorded, and later on (in 1991) released as a live-album, Dansdans …  (Dance, dance  …).

The appearance at the Midt-Fyn Festival was to be Folque’s last, although Jenn, Lars and I continued to play together for some years as an acoustic trio, “Jomfru Mortensens trio”.

Folque was reunited for one gig in 1994, when we held a 20 years anniversary concert in Chateau Neufin Oslo. In 1993 our first album Folque had been reissued on CD, Kjempene … and Vardøger following in 1999.

In 1998 the CD Stormkast was released, containing the best tracks from Landet ditt and Sort Messe, together with live material from the Midt-Fyn Festival. I 2004 Folque was reunited again (but without a drummer) for two gigs, the last at Norsk Folkemuseum in Oslo at Midsummer Eve.

And that’s all folks – so far! Folque didn’t really ever do many gigs, although we did play from Kristiansand in the South to Tromsø in the North, and at all the important Festivals in Norway and a couple in Sweden and Denmark. We never did get much money, and hardly any fame, but we made eight albums over the ten years we played together, and hopefully a few people still remember our music.

Discography :

Folque (1974)

Kjempene på Dovrefjell (1975)

Vardøger (1977)

Dans, dans Olav Liljekrans (1978)

Folques beste (1979)

Fredløs (1980)

Landet ditt (1981)

Sort messe (1983)

Dans dans (1991)

Stormkast (1998)

Folque – “Folque” Album cover photo (front)

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FOLQUE FOLQUE 4

Folque – “Folque” Album photo (A’ Side)

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Folque Photos

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Folque – “Harpa” Video file link on YouTube

Folque – “Folque” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Folque Band’s Page on Spotify

Folque Band’s Page on Apple Music

Folque Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Folque Band’s Page on Discogs

Folque Band’s Homepage

Folque – “Folque” Full Album Download Link on FolkYourself Blog

 

 

 

Progressive Rock Norway 2010s (Tracks) Bjørn Riis – “Lullaby In A Car Crash”

Progressive Rock Norway 2010s (Tracks)

Bjørn Riis (Norway)

“Lullaby In A Car Crash” (written by Bjørn Riis) D1 track (closing track), the track is included on the album “Lullabies In A Car Crash”

Released on Karisma Records (KAR085LP)  in 2014

Lyrics :

Breathe slowly now
And don’t be afraid
Lay down and rest your head
It’s over now
So don’t look back
It’s time to let go
It’s time to face the true
With I mean saying here with you
When your heart slowing down
When you try to hear to brace and now it’s too late
See your time and it’s rushing by no trace
I need you now
So please stay with me

Line-up/Credits :

Bjørn Riis / vocals, acoustic & electric guitars, bass, keyboards, percussion, producer

With:

Vegard Kleftås Sleipnes / keyboards (1), percussion (2,3), engineer

Asle Tostrup / loops & Fx (2,3)

Henrik Fossum / drums

Bjørn Riis – “Lullabies In A Car Crash” Album cover photo (front)

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Bjørn Riis – “Lullaby In A Car Crash” Video file link on YouTube

Bjørn Riis – “Lullabies In A Car Crash” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Homepage

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Facebook

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on ProgArchives

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Bandcamp

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Discogs

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Rate Your Music

Bjørn Riis Artist’s ConcertsSetlists/Tour Dates on Setlist Fm

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Karisma Records

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Spotify

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Instagram

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Apple Music

Bjørn Riis Interview on Rockrolljournalist Blog

Bjørn Riis Artist’s Page on Google Music Store