Embryo – “No Place To Go” (1973)

Band : Embryo (Musical collective from Munich, Germany, founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann)

Country Of Origin : Germany

Members :

Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, vocals, marimba, drums, 1969-2018), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flute, violin, 1969-79, 1985-89), Lothar Meid (bass, 1971), Jimmy Jackson(organ, 1971), Ralph Fischer (bass, 1969-73), Dieter Miekautsch (piano, clavinet, 1972-75), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion, 1986-present), Wolfgang Paap (drums, 1971), Ingo Schmidt (saxophone, 1971), John Kelly (guitar, 1969-72), Charlie Mariano (soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, flute, bamboo flute, nagasuram, 1972-77), Roman Bunka (guitar, saz, vocals, percussion, bass, oud, 1972-80, 1988-96), Hans Fischer (flute, percussion, vocals, 1971), Jörg Evers (bass, 1971-72), Dave King (bass, 1972-73), Uwe Müllrich (bass, 1974-80), Maria Archer (vocals, percussion, 1975), Michael Wehmeyer(percussion, vocals, keyboards, 1983-84, 2002-present), Butze Fischer (drums, percussion, 1977-?), Friedemann Josch (flute, 1983-84), Julius Golombeck (guitar, percussion, oud, vocals, 1985-96), Gerald Luciano (bass, 1985), Lamidi Ayankunle (drums, vocals, 1986-?), Rabiu Ayandokun (drums, 1986-?), Marque Lowenthal (piano, 1988), Paolo Cardoso (bass, 1988), Paramashivam Pilai (vocals, tavil, 1988-?), Nie Xizhi (erhu, muyü, sheng, gaohu, 1995-present), Chris Karrer (oud, 1995-present), Lothar Stahl (drums, marimba), Jens Pollheide, Mik Quantius

Related Artists :

Amon Düül II, Checkpoint Charlie, Dissidenten, Mikrokosmos, Missus Beastly, Moira, Sadja

Track : “No Place To Go” (A1, written by Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard, Dieter Miekautsch, Roman Bunka)

Album : “We Keep On” (Band’s sixth studio album)

Label : BASF (20 21865-1)

Date/Year Of Release : 1973

Category/Music Genres : Jazz Rock, Krautrock, Progressive Rock, Germany, 1970s (Tracks)

Embryo – “No Place To Go”

Video on YouTube

The track is included on the album “We Keep On”, 1973 (A1, opening track)

“We Keep On” album (LP BASF Systems BC 21865 / CD Disconforme Records 1936 (1999) includes two lengthy bonus tracks “Ticket to India” and “Flute, Saz and Marimba” with different order of the tracks).

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Video on YouTube 

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Album cover photo (front)

Album photo (A’ Side)

Image result for embryo we keep on basf

Track-list

01. Abdul Malek (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 3:15
02. Don’t Come Tomorrow (Christian Burchard) – 3:48
03. Ehna, Ehna, Abu Lele (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 8:43
04. Hackbrett-Dance (Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 3:54
05. No Place To Go (Christian Burchard) – 12:27
06. Flute And Saz (Roman Bunka, Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 5:57
Total Time: 38:09
Bonuses:
07. Ticket To India (Christian Burchard) – 15:49
08. Flute, Saz And Marimba (Christian Burchard) – 8:35

Line-up 

– Roman Bunka / guitar, saxophone, vocals, percussion, bass (6)
– Christian Burchard / drums, vocals, percussion, marimba, vibes, hackbrett, Mellotron
– Charlie Mariano / alto & soprano saxes, flute, nagasuram, bamboo flute
– Dieter Miekautsch / acoustic & electric pianos, bass piano on the clavinet

Credits

Design – Holger Matthies

Lacquer Cut By – PF

Liner Notes – Rainer Blome

Liner Notes [Translation] – Mary McGlory

Producer – Embryo (3)

Producer, Photography By [Portraits] – Othmar Schreckeneder

Written-By – Mariano (tracks: A1 to B2, B4), Burchard, Miekautsch (tracks: A1, B1, B4), Bunka (tracks: A1 to B1, B3, B4)

Information about the band

Musical collective from Munich (Germany), founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann. Considered as one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s.
In 1981, Uve Müllrich and Michael Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.
Embryo have continued for over 40 years with Christian Burchard always in charge and an ever changing international cast of musicians including talents from North Africa, India, China, etc., as well as occasionally featuring top jazz names like Mal Waldron and Charlie Mariano and luminaries of the Krautrock scene (source : “Discogs”).

EMBRYO (not to be confused with Italian and Swedish death metal bands of the same name) are a musical collective from Munich who, lead by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard, boast the participation of some 400+ musicians since their beginnings in 1970. Over the years, the band went from classic space rock to jazz fusion, then Burchard soon started travelling the world and recording LPs with African bands and Middle Eastern musicians. They are still going strong and their 30 or so albums cover a wide spectrum of styles, but the constant remains a blend of Krautrock, fusion and ethnic music.

Of particular interest to progsters are four of their earlier albums: “Rache” (heavy, JETHRO TULL inspired), “Steig Aus” (for some warmer, jazzy prog), “Father, Son and Holy Ghost” (lots of ethnic influences) and “We Keep On” (a convincing blend of rock, ethnic and jazz). For fans who have already acquired the taste, “Zack Glück” (’80) is pleasantly quirky and more focussed than the rest of their repertoire; “Reise” (’79) is noteworthy for some interesting Indian fusion tracks; and “Opal” (’70), their very first, is considered their psychedelic masterpiece. For some samplers of more recent material, the album “Ni Hau” (’96), featuring music from China and Mongolia, and the double live cd “Istanboul-Casablanca – Tour 98” are particularly recommended.

If you’re into Krautrock and are a wee bit curious to see what a jazzy FAUST, AMON DÜÜL II or GURU GURU sounds like, you could start with any of the first four albums mentioned above (source : “Progarchives”).

One of the most original and innovative Krautrock bands, Embryo fused traditional ethnic music with their own jazzy space rock style. Over an existence spanning decades, during which Christian Burchard became the only consistent member, the group traveled the world, playing with hundreds of different musicians and releasing over 20 records.

Originally a jazzy space rock band, Embryo were formed in 1969 in Munich, Germany, by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, marimba), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone), Lothar Meid (bass), Jimmy Jackson (organ), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion), Wolfgang Paap (drums), Ingo Schmidt(saxophone), and John Kelly (guitar). However, the lineup was already different by the time sessions for their debut album began. The resulting record, Opal (1970), is considered Embryo’s masterpiece of their early, more psychedelic sound. By the time of Embryo’s Rache (1971), the group was already adding ethnic touches to its music.

In 1972, the same year they played at the Olympic Games in Munich, Embryo were invited by the Goethe Institute to tour Northern Africa and Portugal. In Morocco, the band was fascinated by the different tonal scales used by Moroccan musicians, profoundly shaping the group’s music to come. In 1973, the band was joined by saxophonist Charlie Mariano and guitarist Roman Bunka, who were both influential in moving Embryo toward their genre-blending mixture of space rock and ethnic sounds. We Keep On, released in 1973, was the most successful album in the group’s career.

However, after Surfin’ (1974) and Bad Heads & Bad Cats (1975), Burchard decided Embryo were moving in too commercial a direction and led them on an eight-month excursion to India, where they met local musicians. Shobha Gurtu, an Indian singer the bandmembers met during their travels, would later record an album with them, 1979’s Apo Calypso. Embryo also set up their own record label, Schneeball, with the rock band Checkpoint Charlie during this time, releasing such albums as 1979’s Embryo’s Reise and 1982’s La Blama Sparozzi – Zwischenzonen on the imprint. Embryo also took off on a two-year journey through the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, during which the band’s bus broke down in Tehran near the end of the Iranian Revolution in 1981; this musical expedition was captured by the documentary film Vagabunden-Karawane. After touring Asia, the Middle East, and Egypt during the early ’80s, Embryo released their first studio album in seven years, Zack Gluck, in 1984. The band then toured Africa and became involved with Nigeria’s Yoruba Dun Dun Ensemble.

However, after internal conflicts, Embryo split up. Burchard continued under the Embryo name with new musicians while a new group, Embryo’s Dissidenten, was formed. Embryo continued to release both new and archival recordings into the 21st century, including 2006’s Embryonnck, a collaboration with the No-Neck Blues Band. However, Burchard suffered a stroke in 2016, which effectively ended his career as a musician, and his daughter Marja took over leadership of the group. Christian Burcharddied in January 2018 at the age of 71 (source : “All Music”).

Embryo is a musical collective from Munich which has been active since 1969, although its story started in the mid-1950s in Hof where Christian Burchard and Dieter Serfas met for the first time at the age of 10. It was one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s and has also been described as “the most eclectic of the Krautrock bands.”

History

In 1969 the band was founded by multi instrumentalist Christian Burchard (drums, vibraphone, santur, keyboard) and Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flutes). To date more than 400 musicians have played with the collective, some, such as Charlie Mariano, Trilok Gurtu, Ramesh Shotham, Marty Cook, Yuri Parfenov, Allan Praskin, X.Nie, Nick McCarthy, Monty Waters and Mal Waldron, have played on multiple occasions. Longtime members are Edgar Hofmann (sax, violin), Dieter Serfas (drums), Roman Bunka (guitar, oud), Uve Müllrich (bass), Michael Wehmeyer (keyboard), Chris Karrer (guitar, oud, violin, sax), Lothar Stahl (marimba, drums), and Jens Polheide (bass, flute).

With Ton Steine Scherben, they were founders of the first German independent label Schneeball in 1976.

In 1979 the band started a nine-month tour to India by bus which is documented in the movie “Vagabunden Karawane”. Embryo developed from jazzy Krautrock to a world music band which is able to merge different styles and trends. Many of their albums originated during collective journeys on 4 continents. The band played many festivals around the globe: in India (Mumbai Jazz 1979), England (Reading 1973), Nigeria (Port Harcourt Jazz 1987), Japan (Wakayama 1991) to name a few. In July 2008, Embryo was awarded the German World Music Award RUTH 2008 at the TFF Rudolstadt Festival.

In 1981, Müllrich and Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.

On the road to Marokko in March 2016 Christian Burchard had a stroke. Since then Marja Burchard (drums, vibraphone, vocals, trombone, keyboard), daughter of Christian Burchard, who grew up with the band, is leading Embryo.

On January 17, 2018 Christian Burchard passed away in Munich. He was 71 years old (source : “Revolvy”/”Wikipedia”).

Discography 

Discography

1970: Opal (Ohr)

1971: Embryo’s Rache (United Artists)

1972: Father Son and Holy Ghosts (United Artists)

1972: Steig aus (Brain, a.k.a. This Is Embryo), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: Rocksession (Brain), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: We Keep On (BASF), featuring Charlie Mariano

1975: Surfin (Buk), featuring Charlie Mariano

1976: Bad Heads and Bad Cats (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Live (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Apo Calypso (April), featuring Trilok Gurtu and Shobha Gurtu on one track

1979: Embryo’s Reise (Schneeball/Indigo)

1980: Embryo / Karnataka College of Percussion / Charlie Mariano – Life (Schneeball)

1980: Anthology (Materiali Sonori, compilation reissued on CD as Every Day Is Okay in1992)

1982: La blama sparozzi / Zwischenzonen (Schneeball)

1984: Zack Glück (Materiali Sonori)

1985: Embryo & Yoruba Dun Dun Orchestra Feat. Muraina Oyelami (Schneeball)

1985: Africa (Materiali Sonori)

1989: Turn Peace (Schneeball), featuring Mal Waldron

1994: Ibn Battuta (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Marty Cook on one track

1996: Ni Hau (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Xizhi Nie

1998: Live in Berlin (Schneeball)

1999: Istanbul–Casablanca Tour 1998 (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Alan Praskin

1999: Invisible Documents (Disconforme)

2000: One Night in Barcelona (Recorded at the Joan Miró Foundation) (Disconforme),featuring Yuri Parfenov

2001: Live 2000, Vol. 1 (Schneeball)

2001: Live 2001, Vol. 2 (Schneeball)

2003: Bremen 1971 (Garden of Delights)

2003: Hallo Mik (Schneeball/Indigo, live recordings)

2006: Embryonnck with the No-Neck Blues Band(Schneeball/Staubgold/Sound@One)

2006: News (Ultimate)

2007: Live im Wendland (Schneeball), anti-nuclear solidarity concert 2005 in Gorleben

2007: For Eva , 1967 recording featuring Mal Waldron

2008: Freedom in Music , featuring X. Nie

2008: Live at Burg Herzberg Festival 2007 (Trip in Time)

2008: Wiesbaden 1972 (Garden of Delights)

2010: Embryo 40 (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

2011: Memory Lane, Vols. 1-3 (Download only), featuring Mal Waldron

2016: It Do (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

External links 

Embryo Band’s Homepage

Embryo Band’s Page on Facebook

Embryo Band’s Page on Spotify

Embryo Band’s Page on Last Fm

Charlie Mariano Tribute Page

Embryo Album Reviews on Gnosis2000.Net

Embryo Band’s Documentary on IMDb

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on Rock & Roll Archives

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on 7Digital

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album on Google Play

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Albun on Apple Music

 

 

 

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “The World’s On Fire” (1967)

Band : The Strawberry Alarm Clock (Formed in 1967, in Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.)

Country Of Origin : U.S.A.

Track : “The World’s On Fire” (Opening track)

Album : “Incense And Peppermints (Debut Album)

Label : UNI Records (73014)

Date/Year Of Release : November 1967

Category/Music Genres : Acid Rock, Psychedelic Rock, U.S.A., 1960s


The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “The World’s On Fire”

Video on YouTube

Lyrics 

The world (the world)
Is on fire tonight (tonight)
And this flame that glows (flame that glows)
Is too hot for me to fight (to fight)
Dancing flames (dancing flames)
Twisting, turning out of sight (turning out of sight)
Smoke-filled eyes (smoke-filled eyes)
Crying, “Hold me, hold me tight” (me tight)

Tears of joy
And sad, smiling faces
Oh, make the sparkle above the brightly night

The world (the world)
Is on fire tonight (tonight)
And the flame that flows (flame that flows)
Is still burning oh so bright (so bright)
Blazing arms (blazing arms)
With a heavy appetite (appetite)
The swirling flames (swirling flames)
Blinding everyone in sight (in sight)

Sweat-filled traces
In common places
The price we pay to hear this type of fight

Fire
Fire
Fire
We’re on fire tonight

The song is included on the album “Incense And Peppermints” and it’s the album’s opening track.

“Incense And Peppermints” album 

Album cover photo (front)

Image result for strawberry alarm clock incense and peppermints

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Incense and Peppermints is the first album by psychedelic rock band Strawberry Alarm Clock. Released in November 1967, the album reached No. 11 on the Billboard 200 album charts and included the band’s No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hit “Incense and Peppermints”. In addition to the six official members of the band, the album also featured the flute playing of Steve Bartek, who co-wrote four songs on the album with bass player George Bunnell.

The tracks “The World’s on Fire”, “Rainy Day Mushroom Pillow” and “Incense and Peppermints” were all featured in the motion picture Psych-Out, along with a new song, “Pretty Song from Psych-Out”, which later appeared on the band’s second album, Wake Up…It’s Tomorrow.

A compilation album of the same name (albeit spelled with an ampersand) was released by MCA in 1990. To date, the album has been released on CD only in Japan and (more recently) on Sundazed Records.

Tracks

1. The World’s on Fire (E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 8:25
2. Birds in My Tree (S. Bartek, G. Bunnell) – 1:54
3. Lose to Live (C. King, T. Stern) – 3:15
4. Strawberries Mean Love (G. Bunnell) – 3:02
5. Rainy Day Mushroom Pillow (S. Bartek, G. Bunnell) – 3:04
6. Paxton’s Back Street Carnival (S. Bartek, E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 2:04
7. Hummin’ Happy (E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 2:24
8. Pass Time With The SAC (G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, E. King, J. Pitman, M. Weitz) – 1:21
9. Incense and Peppermints (J. Carter, T. Gilbert) – 2:47
10.Unwind with the Clock (E. King, M. Weitz) – 4:13

Line-up 
George Bunnell – 2nd Bass Guitar, Vocals
Randy Seol – Drums, Bongos, Vibes, Vocals
Lee Freeman –  Rhythm Guitar, Harmonica, Vocals
Edward King – Guitar, Vocals
Mark Weitz – Vocals, Organ, Piano, Harpsichord
Gary Lovetro – 1st Bass Guitar, Vocals

Credits 

Producer – Bill Holmes, Frank Slay

Photography By – Ed Caraeff

Engineer – Paul Buff

Design [Cover Design] – Lazarus/LePrevost

Arranged By – Ed King (2), Howard Davis (2), Mark Weitz

Other [Advice] – Johnny Fairchild

Other [Clothing] – Sat Purish

External Links

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio/Video Playlist on Last Fm

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

 

 

 

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks) Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales” Track’s video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

Terje Rypdal ( Oslo, Norway)

Terje Rypdal Artist’s photo

Image result for terje rypdal

Related Groups :

Dream (6), Jan Garbarek Quartet, Min Bul, Morning Glory (2), Terje Rypdal Trio, Terje Rypdals Orchestra,The Baden-Baden Free Jazz Orchestra, The Chasers, The Esoteric Circle, The George Russell Sextet,The Hugger Muggers, The New Eternal Rhythm Orchestra, The Terje Rypdal Group, The Tomasz Stanko Septet, The Vanguards

Track :

“Dead Man’s Tales” A1 track included on the album “Bleak House”

Album :

“Bleak House”, released on Polydor Records (184 189) in 1968

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Recorded on Oct 7th, 8th and 22nd 1968, at Roger Arnhoff Lydstudio, Oslo, Norway.

A3: “A free form composition based on an idea by T. Rypdal”. The composer credited for B1 is “xxx”.

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

C- Terje Rypdal / guitar, flute, vocals, producer

With:

Christian Reim / piano, organ (3,5)
Carl Magnus Neumann / alto sax & flute (2,5)
Hans Knudsen / baritone sax (2,5)
Jan Garbarek / tenor sax, flute & bells (2-5)
Frode Thingnæs / trombone & tuba (4,5)
Kjell Haugen / trombone (2,4,5)
Tore Nilsen / trombone (2)
Øivind Westby / trombone (2)
Ditlef Eckhoff / trumpet (2)
Jarl Johansen / trumpet (2-5)
Kåre Furuholmen / trumpet (2,4)
Frøydis Ree Hauge / horn (5,6)
Odd Ulleberg / horn (5,6)
Knut Riisnæs / tenor sax (3), arranger & conductor (2,4,5)
Terje Venaas / bass (2-5)
Tom Karlsen / drums (1)
Jon Christensen / drums (2-5)arl Magnus Neumann (tracks: A2 to B2)

Arranged By – Knut Riisnæs (tracks: A2, B1, B2)

Composed By – Terje Rypdal

Engineer [Recording] – Roger Arnhoff

Photography By – Sohlberg Foto

Producer – Terje Rypdal

Recording Supervisor – Odd Løken

Track-list :

1. Dead Man´s Tale (7:03)
2. Wes (4:15)
3. Winter Serenade (6:04):
– a) Falling Snow
– b) Snow Storm
– c) Melting Snow
4. Bleak House (7:05)
5. Sonority (5:21)
6. A Feeling Of Harmony (2:29)

Total time 33:05

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover/track-list photo (back)

Information related to the artist :

“Wikipedia”

Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. He has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as “N3”.

Rypdal was born in Oslo, the son of a composer and orchestra leader. He studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek’s group and later George Russell’s sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany, in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal’s guitar).

His compositions “Last Nite” and “Mystery Man” were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name.

Rypdal was married (1969–1985) to the Norwegian singer Inger Lise Andersen/Rypdal, and they had two children, the auditor Daniel (1970) and the electronica musician Marius (1977). Rypdal was married again in 1988 to Elin Kristin Bergei (born 28 May 1955). They have two children Ane Izabel (1988) and the guitarist Jakob Rypdal (1989). They (as of 2013) live in Tresfjord.

“All Music”

Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal has an instantly recognizable, difficult to peg style, both an as ensemble player and as a soloist. He has directly or indirectly influenced virtually every one of his countrymen who followed him on the instrument. He is also a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and, perhaps most importantly, a world-class composer. He has written six symphonies, numerous chamber works, and sonatas.

Rypdal was born in Oslo in 1947, the son of a conductor and clarinetist for a military band. He began his musical studies on the piano by the age of five, and at eight added trumpet. He abandoned both instruments at age 13 for the guitar. On his chosen instrument, Rypdal was self-taught. Between 1962 and 1967 he was part of the Vanguards, a Norwegian instrumental rock group modeled on the Ventures and the British Shadows, but all that changed when he heard Jimi Hendrix for the first time. Rypdal started the psychedelic rock band Dream in late 1967; they recorded their sole album, Get Dreamy, for Polydor in 1968. That same year he formed another band with saxophonist Jan Garbarek and drummer Jon Christensen, and released his first ambitious meld of rock, classical, and jazz with Bleak House for Polydor under his own name.

Rypdal originally attended the Technical University in Trondheim to become an electrical engineer, but left to study musicology at the University of Oslo. He later attended the Music Conservatory in Oslo (later renamed the Norwegian State Academy of Music) from 1970-1972, where he studied with composers Finn Mortensen and George Russell. Rypdal was part of Garbarek’s quartet for Afric Pepperbird, the saxophonist’s debut for ECM in 1970. He made his debut as a composer with Eternal Circulation in 1971, which was performed with by the Garbarek Quartet and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Rypdal also played with Russell in concert and in the studio, resulting in several offerings including George Russell Presents the Esoteric Circle, and Electric Sonata for Souls Loved by Nature, both issued in 1971. He appeared on Garbarek’s sophomore ECM date Sart, and recorded his self-titled debut for the label (he has been there ever since) that same year. Some of his sidemen for the date included Garbarek, bassist Arild Andersen, and pianist Bobo Stenson. This album walked a generous line between free jazz, progressive, psychedelic rock, and more avant-garde classical music. It established Rypdal as a composer and guitarist throughout Europe.

In 1972, he appeared on the live, star-studded session that was released as Morning Glory in 1973 on Antilles; the other players included John Surman, John Marshall, Chris Laurence, John Taylor, and Malcolm Griffiths. In 1973, Rypdal recorded with Russell again; the ensuing offering was entitled Listen to the Silence. He also composed Concerto for Violbasso and Orchestra for Barre Phillips. He released two of his own albums for ECM in 1974, Whenever I Seem to Be Far Away and What Comes After.

The year 1975 proved monumental for Rypdal. His Symphony No. 1 was commissioned by Norwegian Television, and he released the widely acclaimed double-album Odyssey, which was regarded as the pinnacle of jazz-rock fusion. The Odyssey Band toured the globe and was especially successful in the U.S.A. In 1976, Rypdal did a turnabout, and released the musically impressionistic After the Rain, on which he performed all instruments. He also recorded with Russell but went back to his ensemble work with 1978’s Waves. Rypdal finished the ’70s with a trio date, co-billed with collaborators bassist Miroslav Vitous and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

He commenced the new decade with Descendre, a trio session with Christensen and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Rypdal played keyboards and flute in addition to guitar. To Be Continued, the second album with Vitous and DeJohnette, appeared in 1981. After touring and an extended break during which he worked on his classical composing, Rypdal emerged with his first duet album for ECM, the vanguard classical, electro-acoustic work, Eos in 1984. The guitarist returned to a trio format for The Chaser and Blue in 1985 and 1986, respectively. The latter year also saw the release of a 1970 date he and Garbarek had recorded with the George Russell Sextet, A Trip to Prillargui, released on Soul Note. Rypdal also recorded his groundbreaking modern classical work, Undisonus in 1986 (though it wouldn’t see release for four more years) and composed two more symphonies. In 1989 he released The Singles Collection, a jazz-rock quartet date that focused on exceedingly brief compositions.

The album, Undisonus for Violin and Orchestra / Ineo for Choir and Chamber Orchestra, was finally released in 1990 to massive critical acclaim, and received the “Work of the Year” prize from the Society of Norwegian Composers. It was followed by the long-form work Q.E.D. in 1993, and the jazz-cum-neo-classical fusion set If Mountains Could Sing in 1995. Also that year, Rypdal recorded as a session player with pianist and composer Ketil Bjørnstad’s group on The Sea, and as part of Surman’s ensemble on Nordic Quartet, both issued on ECM. In 1997, the guitarist issued Skywards, a sextet date that walked the line between formal jazz composition and free improvisation. He finished the decade with Bjørnstad on The Sea II, and a guitar duet recording with Ronni Le Tekrø entitled Tekro II on the Grappa label, both in 1998.

Rypdal began the 21st century busier than ever. In addition to receiving commissions to compose, he was part of Markus Stockhausen’s ensemble on Karta, and saw his own Double Concerto/Fifth Symphony issued by ECM. In 2002, his five-movement work, Lux Æterna for soprano, chamber ensemble, organ, trumpet, and guitar, a second album with Tekrø entitled The Radiosong, and his Sonata Op. 73/Nimbus Op. 76 with violinist Birgitte Stærnes, were all released on different labels. In 2006, Vossabrygg, a live sextet date from 2003 inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew group and early Weather Report, was released by ECM. The date also featured an appearance by Rypdal’s son Marius on turntables and samplers. Life in Leipzig, a duet offering with Bjørnstad, followed in 2008. The large-ensemble tribute to film noir, Crime Scene, appeared in 2010, as did Very Much Alive, a mammoth six-disc concert run by jazz drummer Paolo Vinaccia that featured the guitarist Ståle Storløkken and Mikkelborg. After several festival appearances, the completion of commissions, and some time off, Rypdal returned to recording with 2013’s The Melodic Warrior and large-scale ensemble work conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

“Progarchives”

Born 23 August 1947 (Oslo, Norway)

He is known as one of the leading modern jazz guitarists in Europe. At the same time he is regarded to be an outstanding composer of contemporary art music. Rypdal has has a multifarious musical career since he started his pop band “The Vanguards” in the 1960’ies. He later started up “Dream” where his interest for jazz was awakened. In 1969 he joined the Jan Garbarek Quartet. At the same time he even played in George Russell’s Sextet and big band. Rypdal has up through the years composed numerous jazz compositions for own as well as other groups.

Terje Rypdal played the piano from he was five years old, and started up with guitar from the age of 13. As a guitarist he is self-taught. He has studied musicology at the University in Oslo. During the years 1970-72 he studied composition with Finn Mortensen at the Music Conservatory in Oslo (Later the Norwegian State Academy of Music). He has also studied improvisation with George Russell.

As a composer Rypdal received his first impulses from Ligeti, Penderecki and Mahler and he soon developed his own style. His début as a composer was with “Eternal Circulation” (1971), performed with Jan Garbarek Quartet and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Among his works can be mentioned: Symphony No. 1 (1975) commissioned by the Norwegian Television. His opera “Orfeo Turns Around and Watches Eurydice”, premiered in 1972 at the Henie Onstad Art Centre outside Oslo. For the American bass player Barre Phillipps we wrote his “Concerto per violbasso e orchestra” (1973). His violin concerto “Undisonus” received the prize “Work of the Year” by the Society of Norwegian Composers. He has composed five symphonies, several works for solo instruments with orchestra, two operas and a large number of contemporary works with participation of jazz musicians.

Terje Rypdal’s compositions witness his versatile musical work, his rich imagination and solid knowledge. One can find poetic moments with an almost impressionistic colour as well as constellations of sound with elements from jazz, late romanticism and avantgardism. In addition to his large production of modern art music he has also a great number of jazz and rock compositions.

with courtesy of the Music Information Centre Norway.

Photos related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album  photo (A’ Side)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album photo (B’ Side)

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TERJE RYPDAL 1 (2).png

Links related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”Video file link on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Download Link on “Opium Hum”Blog

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Review on “Paste Magazine”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Apple Music”

Links related to the artist :

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Discogs”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “ECM Records”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on IMDb

Terje Rypdal on “Notes On The Road” Terje Rypdal’s Odyssey: New York and Beyond the Infinite An interview with Terje Rypdal from 2012 by Gideon Egger and Ying Zhu

Terje Rypdal Shows on “Mixcloud”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Deezer”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Apple Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Getty Images”

 

 

 

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Armaggedon – “Round”

Armaggedon – “Round” Track’s Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Hard Rock/Heavy Progressive Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Band :

Armaggedon (Berlin, Germany)

Track :

“Round” (written by Manfred Galatik) A1 track (opening track) included on the album “Armaggedon”, recorded on 25th to 29th July and 4th to 5th August 1970

Album :

“Armaggedon” released on Kuckuck Records ( 2375 003) in 1970

Armaggedon – “Armaggedon” Album cover photo (front)

Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records

This German release from 1970 is an absolute belter of an album. Prog rock with psychedelic edges, Anglo-American inspired bluesrock with complex structures, the guitar of Frank Diez drives this one all the way.

Armaggedon / Armaggedon (1970) is the third album of record label ‘Kuckuck Schallplatten’ (Catalogue: LP (Kuckuck 1970) – No, 2375 003/1103-2).
It’s been reissued in 1990 by Ohrwaschl Munich, based on the original master tapes (Catalogue: CD (Ohrwaschl 1990) – No. OWoo3).
It’s been reissued in March 2011 by Esoteric recordings, they say it’s based on the original master tapes and that it was mastered in London (Catalogue: CD (Esoteric Reactive 2009) – No. ereacd 1016).
There is also a vinyl reprint from 2009 by Missing Vinyl, Athens/Greece. (LP (Missing Vinyl 2009) – No MV009).

Kuckuck Schallplatten is a German record label founded in Munich in August 1969 by Eckart Rahn, Mal Sondock and the advertising agency ConceptData in Munich, growing out of Eckart Rahn’s music publishing company E.R.P. Musikverlag (which was founded on April 1, 1968). It was distributed by Deutsche Grammophon (Polydor). It’s the first German progressive rock-label. It is now the longest-surviving independent label in Germany, possibly the world. Most of its recordings have been reissued on CD, and all are now available as downloads via iTunes/Apple.

Line-up :

Frank Diez – Lead Guitar, Vocals
Manfred Galatik – Keyboards, Bass, Vocals
Michael Nürmberg – Bass, Rhythm Guitar
Jürgen Lorenzen – Drums
Peter Seeger – Vocals, left the band because of health problems before they recorded their one and only LP

Credits :

Arranged By – Armaggedon

Cover – Concept Dat

Engineer – Thomas ”Django” Klemt

Photography By – Atelier Hudalla

Producer – Eckart Rahn

Companies :

Recorded At – Union Studios, Munich

Printed By – Gerhard Kaiser GmbH

Manufactured By – Deutsche Grammophon GmbH

Track-list :

01 – Round (4:12), written by Manfred Galatik
02 – Open (7:31), written by Frank Diez
03 – Oh Man (6:01), written by Frank Diez/Jonas Porst
04 – Rice Pudding (9:40), written by Jeff Beck/Ron Wood/Nick Hopkins/Tony Newman
05 – People Talking (5:02), written by Frank Diez/Manfred Galatik
06 – Better By You, Better Than Me (4:36), written by Gary Wright

Armaggedon – “Armaggedon” Album cover photo (back)/Tracklist photo

Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records

Information related to the band :
The band of the excellent guitar player Frank Diez played British inspired bluesrock with complex structures. They recorded only one single album “Armageddon”, which was published in 1970 on the Kuckuck label and is one of the best hardrock albums of the early seventies. Unfortunately, it remained unnoticed.
Information related to the album/track :
Asbjørnsen, Dag Erik: Cosmic Dreams at Play – A guide to German Progressive and Electronic Rock (Borderline Productions, ISBN 1-899855-01-7)”
Armaggedon’s self-titled album is a heavy progressive masterpiece with excellent, Hendrix-influenced guitar work and vocals by Frank Diez. Armaggedon was the start of Diez long and impressive career. Their album has six tracks, and two of them are cover versions. Most impressive is the 10-minute version of Jeff Beck Group’s “Rice Pudding”. This track has some of the greatest heavy guitar riffing to appear on a German record. Their version of Spooky Tooth’s “Better By You, Better Than Me” is also competent enough. In addition, both Frank Diez and Manfred Galatik wrote great songs, as typified by the tracks “People Talking” and “Open”. Michael Nürnberg and Jürgen Lorenzen provide a strong backing. Demand for the group was poor way back in 1970, and Armaggedon soon broke up. Diez later plays with Randy Pie, Karthago, Ihre Kinder (singer: Klaus Kinski), Emergency, Atlantis, Eric Burdon’s Fire Departement, Peter Maffay Band, Konstantin Wecker, Electric Blues Duo. Luckily the Armaggedon album is released on CD in 1991 with a sharp and clean digitally remastered sound (in a limited edition of 1,000 numbered copies).
Photos related to the album/track :
Armaggedon – “Armaggedon Album cover photo (front)
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armaggedon – “Armaggedon Album photo (A’ Side)
Image result for armageddon 1970
Photos related to the band :
From left to right: Jürgen Lorenzen, Frank Diez, Michael Nürnberg and Manfred Galatik
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
Armaggedon Kuckuck’s flyer
Armageddon - Armageddon (1970) - Krautrock - Album - Kuckuck Records
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Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change”

John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

John Mayall (Macclesfield, Cheshire, U.K.)

“Track”

“The Laws Must Change” (written by John Mayall) A1 track (opening track) included on the live album “Turning Point”

Album :

“Turning Point”  released on Polydor Records (583571) in October 1969

The Turning Point is a live album by John Mayall, featuring British blues music recorded at a concert at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East on 12 July 1969.

Originally released with a lyric insert.

The album was produced by John Mayall, who also designed the packaging and was the album’s art director. The recording engineer was Eddie Kramer, who had engineered Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, among others.

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

John Almond – flute, saxophone, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, mouth percussion

Jon Mark – acoustic guitar

John Mayall – guitar, harmonica, keyboards, tambourine, vocals, slide guitar, mouth percussion

Steve Thompson – bass guitar

The performers on the album were Mayall on vocals, harmonica, a slide and a Fender Telecaster guitar, a tambourine, and mouth percussion, Jon Mark on acoustic guitar, Steve Thompson on bass, and Johnny Almond on tenor and alto saxophones, flutes, and mouth percussion. All the songs on the album were written or co-written by John Mayall. Thompson co-wrote CaliforniaThoughts About Roxanne and Don’t Waste My Time.Another track, “I’m Gonna Fight For You, J.B.,” is a tribute to the American blues guitarist J. B. Lenoir who died in 1967 and who had a deep influence on Mayall (this was Mayall’s second such tribute to the musician; “The Death of J.B. Lenoir” appeared on his earlier Crusade album). Two concerts took place, on 11 and 12 July. All tracks are from the second gig.

Credits :

Bob Gordon – photography

Suha Gur – mastering

Eddie Kramer – engineer, audio engineer

Bill Levenson – reissue producer

John Mayall – liner notes, artwork, art direction, design, photography, audio production, telecaster

Monique McGuffin – production coordination

Neil Slaven – liner notes

Tapani Tapanainen – photography

Larry La Fond – photography

Chris Welch – liner notes

Barry Wentzell – photography

Zill – photography

Companies : 

Manufactured By – Polydor Records Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Polydor Ltd.

Made By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Published By – St. George Music

Recorded At – Fillmore East

Lacquer Cut At – Phonodisc Ltd.

Label: Made in England, St. George Music, ® 1969

Track-list :

01. The Laws Must Change – 7:21
02. Saw Mill Gulch Road – 4:39
03. I’m Gonna Fight For You J.B. – 5:27
04. So Hard To Share – 7:05
05. California – 9:30
06. Thoughts About Roxanne  – 8:20
07. Room To Move – 5:03

Bonus tracks (2001 reissue) :

  1. “Sleeping By Her Side” – 5.10
  2. “Don’t Waste My Time” (Mayall, Thompson) – 4.54
  3. “Can’t Sleep This Night” – 6.19

JOHN MAYALL TRACKLIST 1 (2)

Lyrics :

The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
But while the law is standing
You gotta open up your minds
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
But you gotta see both sides
You’ll find yourself in jail ‘fore long
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they’re only doin’ a gig
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they are only doin’ a gig
Gotta try and take the time
To figure out how the issue got that big
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Don’t throw rocks at policemen
But get the knots of law untied
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
The laws must change one day
But it’s goin’ to take some time
Songwriters: John Mayall
Information related to the album/artist/track :
“All Music”
As the elder statesman of British blues, it is John Mayall’s lot to be more renowned as a bandleader and mentor than as a performer in his own right. Throughout the ’60s, his band the Bluesbreakers acted as a finishing school for the leading British blues-rock musicians of the era. Guitarists Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor joined his band in a remarkable succession in the mid-’60s, honing their chops with Mayall before going on to join Cream, Fleetwood Mac, and the Rolling Stones, respectively. John McVie and Mick Fleetwood, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser (of Free), John Almond, and Jon Mark also played and recorded with Mayall for varying lengths of times in the ’60s.

Mayall’s personnel has tended to overshadow his own considerable abilities. The multi-instrumentalist was adept in bringing out the best in his younger charges (Mayall was in his thirties by the time the Bluesbreakers began to make a name for themselves). Doing his best to provide a context in which they could play Chicago-style electric blues, Mayall was never complacent, writing most of his own material revamping his lineup with unnerving regularity, and constantly experimenting and stretching with the basic blues form on groundbreaking recordings such as 1967’s The Blues Alone, on which he played all instruments save for percussion — provided by Keef Hartley — and 1969’s best-selling The Turning Point, a stellar, drum-less unplugged helping of acoustic blues that netted him his biggest hit, the single “Room to Move.” Likewise, 1972’s Jazz Blues Fusion moved the other direction, as it featured Mayall in the company of trumpeter Blue Mitchell, saxophonist Clifford Solomon, guitarist Freddy Robinson, and bassist Larry Taylor. Mayall’s output has been prolific. He has introduced dozens of instrumentalists to the music-listening public including guitarists Coco Montoya and Harvey Mandel, and violinist Don “Sugarcane” Harris. When Clapton joined the Bluesbreakers in 1965, Mayall had already been recording for a year, and performing professionally long before that. Originally based in Manchester, Mayall moved to London in 1963 on the advice of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, who thought a living could be made playing the blues in the bigger city. Tracing a path through his various lineups of the ’60s is a daunting task. At least 15 different editions of the Bluesbreakers were in existence from January 1963 through mid-1970. Some notable musicians (like guitarist Davy Graham, Mick Fleetwood, and Jack Bruce) passed through for little more than a cup of coffee; Mayall’s longest-running employee, bassist John McVie, lasted about four years. The Bluesbreakers, like Fairport Convention or the Fall, were more a concept than an ongoing core. Mayall, too, had the reputation of being a difficult and demanding employer, willing to give musicians their walking papers as his music evolved, although he also imparted invaluable schooling to them while the associations lasted.Mayall recorded his debut single in early 1964; he made his first album, a live affair, near the end of the year. At this point the Bluesbreakers had a more pronounced R&B influence than would be exhibited on their most famous recordings, somewhat in the mold of younger combos like the Animals and Rolling Stones, but the Bluesbreakers would take a turn for the purer with the recruitment of Eric Clapton in the spring of 1965. Clapton had left the Yardbirds in order to play straight blues, and the Bluesbreakers allowed him that freedom (or stuck to well-defined restrictions, depending upon your viewpoint). Clapton began to inspire reverent acclaim as one of Britain’s top virtuosos, as reflected in the famous “Clapton is God” graffiti that appeared in London in the mid-’60s.

In professional terms, though, 1965 wasn’t the best of times for the group, which had been dropped by Decca. Clapton even left the group for a few months for an odd trip to Greece, leaving Mayall to straggle on with various fill-ins, including Peter Green. Clapton did return in late 1965, around the time an excellent blues-rock single, “I’m Your Witchdoctor” (with searing sustain-laden guitar riffs), was issued on Immediate. By early 1966, the band was back on Decca, and recorded its landmark Bluesbreakers LP. This was the album that, with its clean, loud, authoritative licks, firmly established Clapton as a guitar hero, on both reverent covers of tunes by the likes of Otis Rush and Freddie King and decent originals by Mayall himself. The record was also an unexpected commercial success, making the Top Ten in Britain. From that point on, in fact, Mayall became one of the first rock musicians to depend primarily upon the LP market; he recorded plenty of singles throughout the ’60s, but none of them came close to becoming a hit.

Clapton left the Bluesbreakers in mid-1966 to form Cream with Jack Bruce, who had played with Mayall briefly in late 1965. Mayall turned quickly to Peter Green, who managed the difficult feat of stepping into Clapton’s shoes and gaining respect as a player of roughly equal imagination and virtuosity, although his style was quite distinctly his own. Green recorded one LP with Mayall, A Hard Road, and several singles, sometimes writing material and taking some respectable lead vocals. Green’s talents, like those of Clapton, were too large to be confined by sideman status, and in mid-1967 he left to form a successful band of his own, Fleetwood Mac.

Mayall then enlisted 19-year-old Mick Taylor; remarkably, despite the consecutive departures of two star guitarists, Mayall maintained a high level of popularity. The late ’60s were also a time of considerable experimentation for the Bluesbreakers, who moved into a form of blues-jazz-rock fusion with the addition of a horn section, and then retreated into mellower, acoustic-oriented music. Mick Taylor, the last of the famous triumvirate of Mayall-bred guitar heroes, left in mid-1969 to join the Rolling Stones. Yet in a way Mayall was thriving more than ever, as the U.S. market, which had been barely aware of him in the Clapton era, was beginning to open up for his music. In fact, at the end of the ’60s, Mayall moved to Los Angeles. Released in 1969, The Turning Point, a live, all-acoustic affair, was a commercial and artistic high point.

In America at least, Mayall continued to be pretty popular in the early ’70s. His band was as unstable as ever; at various points some American musicians flitted in and out of the Bluesbreakers, including Harvey Mandel, Canned Heatbassist Larry Taylor, and Don “Sugarcane” Harris. Although he’s released numerous albums since, and remains a prodigiously busy and reasonably popular live act, his post-1970 output generally hasn’t matched the quality of his ’60s work. Following collaborations with an unholy number of guest celebrities, in the early ’80s he re-teamed with a couple of his more renowned vets, John McVie and Mick Taylor, for a tour, which was chronicled by Great American Music’s Blues Express, released in 2010. The ’60s albums are what you want, though over the past decades, there’s little doubt that Mayall has done a great deal to popularize the blues all over the globe. Continuing to record and tour into his eighties, Mayall released A Special Life, recorded at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood and featuring a guest spot by singer and accordion player C.J. Chenier, in 2014. The album was universally celebrated as one of his best.

A live archival recording of the Green, McVie, Fleetwood-era Bluesbreakers was released in April as Live in 1967. Meanwhile, the bandleader, his co-producer Eric Corne, and his seven-year old group — Rocky Athas, guitar; Greg Rzab, bass; Jay Davenport, drums — were in the studio. They emerged with Find a Way to Care, a set that showcased Mayall’s highly underrated keyboard playing on a set of originals and vintage covers including Percy Mayfield’s “The River’s Invitation.” The album was released in the late summer of 2015. Talk About That, Mayall’s second album for Forty Below, arrived in late 2017.

In the spring of 2018, at the age of 85, Mayall had to cancel a U.S. tour due to a nasty bout with pneumonia. That summer, sufficiently recovered, he hit the recording studio and emerged with the full-length Nobody Told Me in the late fall. Its first single, “Distant Lonesome Train,” was co-written with Joe Bonamassa (who also played guitar on it and another track). Other guests included Steve Van Zandt, Todd Rundgren, Alex Lifeson, Larry McCray, and Carolyn Wonderland. Mayall, ever the road warrior, embarked on a world tour after the album’s release that continued into 2019.

Photos related to the album/track :

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album cover photo (front)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album photo (A’ Side)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo 

Photos related to the artist :

Image result for JOHN MAYALL

Image result for JOHN MAYALL 1969

Image result for JOHN MAYALL

Related image

JOHN MAYALL 2 (2)

Related image

JOHN MAYALL 1 (2)

John Mayall Recording Saturday Cub at the BBC Theater 1969, Mini Poster

Image result for JOHN MAYALL 1969

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Psychedelic Pop/Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude”

Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Psychedelic Pop/Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Band :

“Birmingham Sunday” (Carson City, Nevada, U.S.A.)

Track :

“Egocentric Solitude” A1 (written by Birmingham Sunday), (opening track) included on the album “A Message From Birmingham Sunday”

Album :

A Message From Birmingham Sunday” (debut album) released on All American Records ( AA-5718) in 1968

Original pressing on red, white and blue label.

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album cover photo (front)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Video on YouTube

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

Debbie Parke – vocals
Joe LaChew – guitar, drums, the vocals
Ward Johns – guitar
John Kvam – bass
Jean Heim – rhythm guitar, the vocals
Phil Gustafson – keyboards, Saxophones
Monty the Johns – drums

Bill Holmes – producer

Track-list :

01. Egocentrick Solitude — 3:15
02. Wondering What To Feel — 2:33
03. Prevalent Visionaries — 2:47
04. You’re Out Of Line — 2:52
05. Medieval Journey — 2:34
06. Mr. Waters (The Judge) — 2:48
07. Fate And The Magician — 1:55
08. Peter Pan Revisited — 2:12
09. Time To Land — 2:59
10. Don’t Turn Around — 2:37

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album’s Track-list photo

Untitled

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Discogs”

US American Psychedelic Rock band from Carson City (Nevada) formed late 1960s.
Four of the musicians went to the same school, where he formed a band that played at local clubs all over northern Nevada and in the Carolinas. In 1968, they were able to conclude a contract with Bill Holmes, the producer of “Strawberry Alarm Clock” and the label “All American Record”. Vinyl has been published as a trial, a limited edition of 100 copies. Although the band played in different styles, the album is a good example of pop psychedelia. Alternating male and female vocals, using wind, keyboard and string instruments.

“Rockasteria”

Birmingham Sunday was formed in September 1966, and they were named after the Sunday concerts that took place in Birmingham, England. The original lineup of Birmingham Sunday featured bassist John Kvam, drummer Monty Johns, guitarist (and Monty’s brother) Ward Johns, organ/sax player Phil Gustafson and guitarist Joe LaChew.

Monty and Ward Johns had been in The Contrasts, who covered popular Beatles and Beach Boys tunes. John Kvam was a guitarist in the folk rock group The Scroachers, and learned bass after joining Birmingham Sunday. Phil Gustafson was the keyboardist and sax player for the rock band The Kensingtons. Gustafson was trained as a pianist and sang in the church choir, and he played sax in his high school band. Even though Phil’s voice could easily handle the demands of opera, he preferred to sing background harmony with Birmingham Sunday. Joe LaChew was the guitarist and vocalist for the group The Freedom Five, who covered the blues-based output of British bands like The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and The Animals. At the age of 15, LaChew earned his stripes as a songwriter when he wrote a campaign song for the Nevada governor at the time, Grant Sawyer. The Freedom Five recorded a single of Joe’s song and sold it at various campaign sites throughout the state.

Birmingham Sunday started to play teen dances throughout northern Nevada. Their biggest crowds were at the Civic Auditorium in Carson City and at Genoa Town Hall. The group put on dances and rented halls in Carson City, Genoa, Minden and Reno to cover their increasing fan base.

In 1967, Birmingham Sunday was poised for their breakthrough. Joe LaChew and Monty Johns were attending the University of Nevada in Reno, and their band had a much greater following – especially since the university dorms and fraternities now had their own party band!

That summer season, Birmingham Sunday landed a house band gig at American Legion Hall in South Lake Tahoe, California. This involved playing five days a week at the hall, plus performing as the opening act for each weekend’s entertainment. The venue was filled every summer night with Californians from the Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay area. Weekend shows were extravaganzas, as well-known San Franciscan acts like The Grateful Dead and Sly And The Family Stone were frequently brought in with local favorites The Family Tree and Jim Burgett.

The American Legion Hall’s weekend festival on July 28-29, 1967 was headlined by The Grateful Dead and Jim Burgett, with Birmingham Sunday, The Justice Five and Velvet Chain on the bill. This festival is where Birmingham Sunday first heard Debbie Parke sing. Debbie was performing a guest spot with The Justice Five at the shows.

A few months later, Debbie Parks joined Birmingham Sunday, adding her strong voice to the mix. She was only 15 and a sophomore in high school. Even though Debbie’s voice was overpowering, she did not try to dominate the band. Instead, her voice blended well with the rest of the singers in the band. Birmingham Sunday was now playing more originals as part of their sets. They began attracting interest from numerous managers and record company scouts.

Phil Gustafson left for the summer to attend National Guard camp, and he was replaced by his younger brother Dave. Dave Gustafson was a child prodigy that could play any style from Beethoven and Bach to Jimmy Smith. In addition, Dave could read and copy nearly everything he heard. His great playing impressed crowds with a note-for-note rendition of The Doors’ “Light My Fire.”

Birmingham Sunday’s success carried them into 1968. Everyone’s favorite hipster, Pat Boone (!), co-sponsored a “Teen Scene” local battle of the bands with promoter Bruce Blaylock. This two-day event was held at Reno’s Centennial Coliseum, where groups like The Kinks, Buffalo Springfield, The Zombies, The Beach Boys and many others had played. The judges were the members of The Sunshine Company, who had recently enjoyed some success. The Sunshine Company had a similar approach and appreciated Birmingham Sunday’s vocal tapestry.

Birmingham Sunday was chosen with the top bands to travel to Las Vegas for the finals. The Las Vegas judges were Strawberry Alarm Clock and their manager/producer Bill Holmes. The Las Vegas band London Fogg won the battle, but Bill Holmes greatly preferred Birmingham Sunday’s original songs and he was very impressed by their vocals.

Birmingham Sunday was invited by promoter Bruce Blaylock to do some recordings in Hollywood. Blaylock was shopping the band to Nitty Gritty Dirt Band manager Bill McEuen as well as a representative of that group’s label, Liberty Records. Birmingham Sunday did an audition and received a record deal from Liberty. The record label had a song that they wanted Birmingham Sunday to record – the “Love Theme From Romeo & Juliet,” also known as “A Time For Us.” It was later recorded by Henry Mancini, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis.

After hearing the demos, Bill Holmes took on Birmingham Sunday as their producer and manager. Holmes turned down the Liberty deal, which proved to be a big mistake when Henry Mancini’s recording became a big pop hit. Instead, Birmingham Sunday was signed to Bill Holmes’ All-American label.

Meanwhile, the band had changed. Monty Wards left after the “Teen Scene” contest for a rigorous, pre-med schedule at the University of Nevada. Birmingham Sunday auditioned singing drummers, but no one materialized. With concert bookings to be fulfilled and not much time to prepare, Joe LaChew took over as the drummer. Monty had been teaching Joe all the drum parts for their original songs, so LaChew had no problem in this transition period. Since Joe gave up his guitar to play drums, the group had to find another guitarist who could sing well. They found Jean Heim, who played rhythm guitar and a little lead guitar. Heim could also sing lead with his pure, light tenor tone.

The group perfected ten original songs and recorded them in December 1968 with Bill Holmes producing at Original Sound Recording Studios. The studio was located on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, and it was owned by multiple award winning DJ and promoter Art Laboe. The legendary Paul Buff, who previously ran Pal Recording Studio before selling it to his recording partner Frank Zappa, was Original Sound’s engineer. The album “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” was recorded in five days using Buff’s own ten-track studio equipment. Paul Buff also played a Chamberlin keyboard, the American precursor to the mellotron, on the entire album. Buff’s string arrangements on the Chamberlin were essential parts of each song.

All-American selected “Prevalent Visionaries” and “Egocentric Solitude” as the respective A- and B-sides of a single released in early September 1969. The album was released the same month. Before the album was released, Bill Holmes sent a tape of the single to radio stations in Nevada.

“Egocentric Solitude” was first tracked for the week ending August 16, 1969 by Reno, Nevada radio station KIST. It reached the Top 10 in Reno that September 10, and it was #5 on KCBN. Although the single did not receive wide distribution, it did well in Sacramento, Chicago, Seattle, and especially Santa Barbara, where it made #1! The lack of distribution made the album extremely rare, even at the time. About 10 to 20 copies of the original LP are known to exist today.

Many of Bill Holmes’ All-American acts played concerts on July 18-19, 1969 at Kings Beach on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. On the first day, Birmingham Sunday was the opening act. However, the popularity of the band enabled Birmingham Sunday to close the second night’s show. Holmes had lost control of Strawberry Alarm Clock, so he had the replacement group Strawberry SAC play instead. Gary Solomon, the lyric writer of “Egocentric Solitude,” was in that band. Birmingham Sunday ruled the weekend event!

Birmingham Sunday played concerts throughout 1969, but they split up in 1970 due to a number of forces pulling band members in different directions. Joe LaChew and Monty Johns stayed in college to continue their education. Both Joe and Monty formed the college rock band Brother Rock with Ward Johns. This nine-piece horn band opened for concerts at the college, including shows by Cold Blood, Tower Of Power, The Sons Of Champlin, and most notably, Derek And The Dominoes.

Brother Rock did a recording for the Mercury label in San Francisco, but the tracks have been lost. While influenced by Chicago and The Sons Of Champlin, Brother Rock played original songs by Monty Johns and Joe LaChew.

Debbie Parke, Jean Heim, John Kvam and the Gustafson brothers joined well-known Nevada casino lounge singer Frankie Fanelli. They recorded an album with Fanelli before splitting with him in August 1970. The band members went into different directions:

Joe LaChew continued playing guitar with The Drifters, The Coasters, Billy Preston, The Righteous Brothers, Rose and Joe Maphis, Merle Travis, Dorsey Burnett, Jimmy Dickens, Zella Lehr (an RCA artist), Kathy O’Shea (for MCA) and comedian Rich Little. Joe is now a music teacher in Nevada and still plays shows in the Reno and Lake Tahoe areas. He still enjoys writing music and has done commercials, film music and solo albums. Joe still writes songs for the more recent Birmingham Sunday reunions. Two of those tracks, “Raw Rhythm” and “C’Est La Vie Blues,” are included here for the first time. The famous Birmingham Sunday parties continue to this day!

Debbie Parke became an elementary school teacher and counselor in Lewiston, Idaho. She is now retired. Phil Gustafson retired from the Nevada National Guard. John Kvam was a bartender and journeyman cabinet maker before his retirement. Jean Heim became a country musician and has also retired. Monty Johns is a doctor in West Virginia. Ward Johns was the Vice President of Missile Records. He passed away from compilations due to a stroke in December 2009. Dave Gustafson became a successful musician and very wealthy real estate agent. He passed in January 2010.
by Joe LaChew (Birmingham Sunday)

Photos related to the album/track :

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album cover photo (front)

BIRMINGHAM SUNDAY A MESSAGE FROM (2)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album photo (A’ Side)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the band :

BIRMINGHAM SUNDAY 2 (2)

Links related to the album/track :

Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Download Link on “60-70 Rock” Blog

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album on “Napster”

Links related to the band :

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Discogs”

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Spotify”

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Napster”

 

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Hölderlin – “Waren Wir”

Hölderlin – “Waren Wir” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Band :

Hölderlin (Wuppertal, Düsseldorf, Germany)

Image result for holderlin 1972

Hoelderlin were a German progressive rock band that was formed in 1970 as Hölderlin by brothers Joachim and Christian von Grumbkow with Nanny de Ruig, whom Christian was married to. They were influenced by rock, jazz, and folk music.

Track :

“Waren Wir” A1 track (written by Christian von Grumbkow), (opening track) included on the album “Hölderlins Traum”

Album :

Hölderlins Traum” released on Pilz (20 21314-5) in 1972

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (front)

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Video on YouTube

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Soundcloud

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

Nanny de Ruig – female vocals
Christian von Grumbkow – guitar
Joachim von Grumbkow – cello, acoustic guitar, flute, piano, organ, mellotron
Peter Käseberg – bass, acoustic guitar, vocals
Christoph Noppeney – violin, flute, piano
Michael Bruchmann – drums, percussion
Peter Bursch – sitar (03)
Mike Hellbach – tablas (03)

All tracks written by Christian von Grumbkow .

Credits :

Artwork – Helmut Friz

Engineer [Sound] – Dieter Dierks

Photography – Victor

Producer – Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser

Walter Westrupp – recorder (05)

Recorded January 1972 at Tonstudio Dierks in Stommeln.

Released in a laminated gatefold cover.

Track-list :

01. Waren wir – 4:50
02. “Peter” – 2:55
03. Strohhalm – 2:04
04. Reqiem für einen Wicht – 6:36
05. Erwachen – 4:04
06. Wetterbericht – 6:37
07. Traum – 7:23

HOLDERLIN HOLDERLINS TRAUM 2 (2)

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Discogs”

From Wuppertal, circa 20 miles east of Düsseldorf, Germany, Hölderlin evolved out of a 1960’s folk group playing Fairport Convention and Pentangle songs. They took their name from the 19th Century writer Friedrich Hölderlin.
Originally, they were a family band, the core was the brothers Christian and Jochen von Grumbkow, with Christian’s wife Nanny as lead singer, with a trippy cosmic styled progressive folk, full of rich textures, psychedelic, medieval and classical touches.

“Wikipedia”

The group started out as a folk group, but after the release of their first album in 1972 and the departure of Nanny in 1973, the group began to change musical direction, incorporating jazz and rock. They changed their name to Hoelderlin in 1973 and took legal action against Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser, the head and founder of the label Pilz, which eventually led to the record label going out of business. In 1975 they got a new record contract with the label Spiegelei and released their second album the same year. After the release of three more albums, almost all of the founding members left the group, leaving Joachim to be the only remaining founding member. This led to both a significant change in lineup and another significant change in musical direction. The group was introduced to Dave Hutchins, who was an engineer for the Genesis album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and subsequently decided to develop an anglo-american commercial sound that later resulted in two more albums before their split in 1980. The album Fata Morgana was then put together and released by Spiegelei the following year. The group reunited in 2005 with only Hans Bäär and Michael Bruchmann as former members. However, Christoph and Nanny made special guest appearances for a few of their subsequent performances. Upon the release of their eighth album, the group then split up again in 2009.

Personnel :

Michael Bruchmann – drums (1971-1978, 2005-2009)

Hans Bäär – bass, guitars, vocals (1976-1981, 2005-2009)

Ann-Yi Eötvös – vocals (2005-2009)

Andreas Hirschmann – keyboards, vocals (2005-2009)

Joachim von Grumbkow – keyboards, vocals (1970-1981) (died 1990)

Christian von Grumbkow – guitar (1970-1977), lyrics (1970-1978)

Christoph Noppeney – violin (1971-1977), guitar, vocals (1975-1978)

Tommy L’Ohr – guitar, vocals (1977-1981)

Peter Käseberg – bass, vocals (1970-1975)

Eduard Schicke – drums (1978-1981)

Nanny de Ruig (1970-1972)

Pablo Weeber – guitar, vocals (1976-1977)

Discography :

Hölderlins Traum (Pilz, 1972)

Hoelderlin (Spiegelei, 1975)

Clown & Clouds (1976)

Rare Birds (1977)

Traumstadt (Live Album, 1978)

New Faces (1979)

Fata Morgana (1981)

8 (2007)

“ProgArchives”

Founded in Wuppertal, Germany in 1970 – Disbanded in 1980 – Reformed from 2005-2009

This, in my opinion, underrated German progressive rock band has its roots in ’63 when the brothers Joachim and Christian Grumbkow founded the rock-band The BEATKIDS and played covers from The BEATLES, The ROLLING STONES and The SHADOWS. In november ’70 the brothers GRUMBKOW presented the name HÖLDERLIN (derived from a German romantic poet) after they had played with a sery of musicians mainly folk-rock covers (especially TRAFFIC), all layered with long instrumental improvisations. Then HÖLDERLIN got an invitation from a record company, this after only three months of their existence! The debut-album “Hölderlin’s Traum” was released in ’72 with a nine-piece line up, including female vocals and instruments like the Mellotron, Grand piano, violin, cello, sitar, tablas and flute. Their sound is a progressive blend of rock, jazz and folk. It sold 5000 copies and the LP is still a collector’s item. But then the troubles began with their producer Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser (TANGERINE DREAM, KLAUS SCHULZE and WALLENSTEIN). He tried to force the band into a more cosmic approach (‘LSD’ inspired complained the band) and was not amused with the “more political oriented lyrics” as he analyzed.

It took almost three years with many juridical conflicts to get rid off the contract but eventually HÖLDERLIN won their case. Under the new name HOELDERLIN (in German the pronunciation of “oe” is the same as the “ö” and much easier to write or type) the second eponymous LP was released in 75. The band called their music ‘romantic rock’, it sounded more jazzy and it contained echoes from KING CRIMSON and GENESIS. HOELDERLIN toured through Scandinavia, Holland, Germany and Switzerland, got good reviews and radio – and tv-airplay. In ’76 HOELDERLIN released the album entitled “Clowns and Clouds”. The music consists of more complex rock with many theatrical and surrealistic elements. In ’77 Christian had a mental breakdown, he could no longer combine the too busy work with the band and his family life (the upbringing of two children). He left and Spanish guitar player Pablo Weeber joined HOELDERLIN. In ’77 they released the album “Rare Birds”, a year later followed by the 2-LP “Hoelderlin Live Traumstadt”. Soon after the unstable personality of Pablo led to his dismiss. “Traumstadt” got very good reviews, it even reached the German charts. Further releases were “New Faces” (’79) and “Fata Morgana” (’81), including new drummer Eduard Schicke, know from the progrock trio SCHICKE, FUHRS, FRÖHLING. These albums have a more accessible melodic rock approach.

The double-album “Hoelderlin Live Traumstadt” is their finest work and showcases the band at their pinnacle. It’s still considered as one of the milestones in the German rock history and has some similarities with other German progrock band GROBSCHNITT concerning the long solos, visual effects, costumes and humor. The music was recorded in the Wuppertaler Opernhaus in October ’77, the 2-LP was released in ’78. The band was hit by multiple changes in the line-up, on “Traumstadt” the musicians were Joachim Grumbkow (keyboards and vocals on “Streaming”), Pablo Weeber (all guitars), Michael Bruchmann (drums), Cristoph ‘Nops’ Noppeney (lead vocals and violin) and Hans Bäär (bass). All the nine melodic tracks have their own climate and features fluid accelerations, nice interludes, pleasant keyboards (string-ensemble, electric piano, organ and clavinet) and great interplay between electric guitar and violin. But the focus is on the solo work: fiery (“Sun Rays”), biting (“Soft Landing”) and howling (“Die Stadt”) on the electric guitar and exciting (“Streaming”) and spectacular (“Die Stadt”) on the violin. Many solos are supported by the wonderful and distinctive sound of the string-ensemble, a compelling combination! Recommended, especially to the fans of the violin play of Jean Luc PONTY and Eddie JOBSON.

Photos related to the album/track :

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (front)

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (back)

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album  photo (A/B’ Sides)

Photos related to the band :

holderlin band

holderlin band

holderlin band

Links related to the album/track :

Hölderlin – “Waren Wir” Track Video on “YouTube”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Soundcloud”

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum Full Album Audio Playlist on “Shazam”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album on “Google Play”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album on “Apple Music”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Download Link on “Old Rock News” Blog

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Download Link on “Free Spiritual Be-In” Blog

Links related to the band :

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “ProgArchives”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Discogs”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Musikzirkus”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Spotify”

Hölderlin Article about the band on “Rheinlaender”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Google Play”