Brian Eno – “An Ending Ascent” (1983)

Artist : Brian Eno (Brian Peter George St John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno, born  on 15th May 1948, in Woodbridge, Suffolk, U.K.)

Country Of Origin : U.K. 

Track : “An Ending Ascent” (A5 track, instrumental, written by Brian Eno)

Album ” Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” (Apollo: Atmospheres and Soundtracks is the ninth solo studio album by British ambient musician Brian Eno, released in 1983. It was written, produced, and performed by Brian Eno, his brother Roger and Daniel Lanois. Music from the album appeared in the films 28 Days LaterTraffic, and Trainspotting, whose soundtrack sold approximately four million copies. Two of the songs from the album, “Silver Morning” and “Deep Blue Day”, were issued as a 7″ single on EG Records).

Label : EG Records (EGLP 53), Polydor Records (813 535-1)

Date/Year Of Release : July 1983 (recorded Grant Avenue Studio, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada 1981-1982)

Category/Music Genres : Ambient, Electronic, Experimental, Soundtracks, Space Ambient U.K. 1980s (Tracks)

Brian Eno

Artist’s photo

Image result for BRIAN ENO

Brian Eno “An Ending Ascent”

Video on YouTube

Brian Eno “An Ending Ascent”

Video on Vimeo

The track is included on the album “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” (A5 track)

“Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Album (released in 1983)

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Album cover photo (front)

Album photo (A’ Side)

Image result for eno apollo

Tracks 

1. “Under Stars” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (4:25)
2. “The Secret Place” (Daniel Lanois, arranged Brian Eno) (3:27)
3. “Matta” (Brian Eno) (4:14)
4. “Signals” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (2:44)
5. “An Ending (Ascent)” (Brian Eno) (4:18)
6. “Under Stars II” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (3:15)
7. “Drift” (Roger Eno, Brian Eno) (3:03)
8. “Silver Morning” (Daniel Lanois) (2:35)
9. “Deep Blue Day” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno) (3:53)
10. “Weightless” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno) (4:28)
11. “Always Returning” (Brian Eno, Roger Eno) (3:49)
12. “Stars” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois) (7:57)

Line-up

Musicians: Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois, Roger Eno

Credits 

Cover Art : Russel Mills
Mastered by Greg Calbi, at Sterling Sound

Co-producer – Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois

Information about the artist 

Brian Eno, in full Brian Peter George St. John le Baptiste de la Salle Eno, (born May 15, 1948, Woodbridge, Suffolk, England), British producer, composer, keyboardist, and singer who helped define and reinvent the sound of some of the most popular bands of the 1980s and ’90s and who created the genre of ambient music.

While an art student in the late 1960s, Eno began experimenting with electronic music, and in 1971 he joined the fledgling band Roxy Music as keyboardist and technical adviser. A rivalry with singer Bryan Ferry led Eno to leave the group in 1973, whereupon he launched a solo career. No Pussyfooting (1973), a collaboration with guitarist Robert Fripp from King Crimson, used tape-echo and tape-delay techniques to create new sounds and reached the Top 30 in Britain. Eno’s next album, Here Come the Warm Jets (1973), was soon followed by the proto-punk single “Seven Deadly Finns.” In the mid-1970s Eno began developing his theory of ambient music, creating subtle instrumentals to affect mood through sound. Albums such as Discrete Music (1975), Music for Films (1978), and Music for Airports(1979) exemplified this approach.

During this period Eno also began producing albums for other artists, and his experimental approach to music making was well suited to such alternative performers as Devo, Ultravox, and David Bowie(especially on Bowie’s trilogy of albums recorded primarily in Berlin). Although Eno’s work was influential, it was not until his collaborations with Talking Heads and U2 that mainstream listeners became familiar with his sound, most notably on Talking Heads’ Top 20 album Remain in Light (1980) and U2’s chart-topping albums Unforgettable Fire (1984), The Joshua Tree (1987), and Achtung Baby(1991).

Throughout the 1990s, Eno joined a number of visual artists to provide sound tracks to installation pieces, and in 1995 he worked with Laurie Anderson on Self Storage, a series of installations housed in individual lockers at a London storage facility. Anderson provided the vocals for a track on Eno’s electronic album Drawn from Life (2000), and Eno followed with a rare vocal album of his own, Another Day on Earth (2005). He returned to the producer’s chair for Paul Simon’s critically lauded Surprise (2006) and Coldplay’s multi-platinum Viva la Vida (2008).

In 2008 Eno teamed with former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne for their first collaborative effort in nearly three decades. Adopting the self-publishing model popularized by Radiohead, Byrne and Eno released Everything That Happens Will Happen Today on the Internet, where listeners could stream the entire album for free or purchase physical or digital copies directly from the artists. Also in 2008 Eno and Peter Chilvers debuted the first of several smartphone apps that allowed the user to create generative music. Eno later collaborated with Karl Hyde of the British electronic band Underworld for the Afrobeat-inspired Someday World and the more accessible High Life (both in 2014) and with pianist Tom Rogerson on Finding Shore (2017). Among Eno’s own albums, the four-track The Ship (2016) meditated on the sinking of the Titanic and on World War I. In 2018 he released a box set of music commissioned for art pieces, Music for Installations (source : encyclopedia “Britannica”).

Information about the album/track

The track, along with the rest of the album, was composed for the film For All Mankind, a documentary on the early years of NASA. The film wasn’t completed until 1989.
Aside from those that feature country & western guitar, “An Ending (Ascent)” stands out from Brian Eno’s other ambient tracks due to its clear use of discernible (yet slow-moving) melody.
The track has appeared in a number of media uses, including in the TV series JamTop Gear and Nip/Tuck; films Traffic28 Days Later and Drive; and David Firth’s animation Salad Fingers.
Frou Frou sampled the track in their song “Hear Me Out” in 2002, as did Burial in 2006 for “Forgive” (source : “Songfacts”).

This music was originally recorded in 1983 for a feature-length documentary movie called “Apollo” later retitled For All Mankind, directed by Al Reinert. The original version of the film had no narration, and simply featured 35mm footage of the Apollo moon missions collected together roughly chronologically, and set to Eno’s music as it appears on the album. Although the film had some limited theatrical runs at art house cinemas in some cities, audience response was lukewarm. The filmmakers still felt the film could do better if it reached a wider audience, and so they re-edited the film, added commentaries from the Apollo astronauts themselves, re-structured the music, and re-titled the film in the process. Various edits of the film were shown to test audiences for further refining. As all this was going on, the film’s release was delayed until 1989. By that time several tracks on the album were omitted from the soundtrack and replaced by other pieces by Eno and other artists.

The tracks from the album that remain on the final edit of the film are:

  • “Always Returning”
  • “Drift”
  • “Silver Morning”
  • “Stars”
  • “Under Stars”
  • “The Secret Place”
  • “An Ending (Ascent)”

The newer tracks from the film that are not on the album (but appear on Music for Films III) are:

  • “Sirens” (Brian Eno, Daniel Lanois)
  • “Theme for ‘Opera'” (Brian Eno, Roger Eno)
  • “Fleeting Smile” Roger Eno)
  • “Tension Block” (Daniel Lanois)
  • “Asian River” (Brian Eno)
  • “Quixote” (Roger Eno)
  • “4-Minute Warning” (John Paul Jones)
  • “For Her Atoms” (Lydia Kavina (Theremin), Misha Malin)

In the liner notes, Eno relates that when he watched the Apollo 11 landing in 1969 he felt that the strangeness of that event was compromised by the low quality of the television transmission and an excess of journalistic discussion, and that he wished to avoid the melodramatic and uptempo way it was presented. That philosophy dominated when For All Mankind (“Apollo”) was originally released as a non-narrative collection of NASA stock footage from the Apollo program. The non-narrative version of the film with the Eno soundtrack was released on VHS video in 1990 by the National Geographic Society. An alternative version was also released by NASA featuring audio interviews but omitting the Brian Eno soundtrack.

The album contains a variety of styles. “Under Stars”, “The Secret Place”, “Matta”, “Signals”, “Under Stars II”, and “Stars” are all dark, complicated textures similar to those on Eno’s previous album Ambient 4/On Land. “An Ending (Ascent)”, “Drift”, and “Always Returning” are smoother electronic pieces. “Silver Morning”, “Deep Blue Day”, and “Weightless” are country and western inspired ambient pieces featuring Daniel Lanois on guitar.

Country music, which Eno listened to as a child in Woodbridge on American armed forces radio, was used to “give the impression of weightless space.” 

“Under Stars” is a recurring theme in the album, first appearing as an ambient electronic bed behind a treated guitar. “Under Stars II” is the same composition, but with different effects and treatments. “Stars” is the pure background texture without the guitar.

The track “An Ending (Ascent)” was sampled in the song “Hear Me Out” by the group Frou Frou, in “Forgive” by British producer Burial, additionally in “Ascent” by Michael Dow, a London electronic music producer, and has been used in several films such as Traffic and 28 Days Later, and in the London Olympiad opening (the memorial wall section).

Many of the tracks on the album were recorded with soft “attacks” of each note, then played backwards, with multiple heavy echoes and reverb added in both directions to merge the notes into one long flowing sound with each note greatly overlapping each adjacent note, producing the “floating” effects that Eno desired.

The Yamaha DX7 was used extensively by Eno on the album. “…so many processings and reprocessings – it’s a bit like making soup from the leftovers of the day before, which in turn was made from leftovers…” (making the album) Eno said, “…. Well, I love that music anyway …. what I find impressive about that music is that it’s very concerned with space in a funny way. Its sound is the sound of a mythical space, the mythical American frontier space that doesn’t really exist anymore. That’s why on Apollo I thought it very appropriate, because it’s very much like “space music” — it has all the connotations of pioneering, of the American myth of the brave individual.

n the summer of 2009 a live version of the album was performed at two concerts in the IMAX cinema of London’s Science Museum and in an arrangement by South Korean composer Woojun Lee for the ensemble Icebreaker with featured artist B J Cole on pedal steel guitar. The album was performed in its entirety, with the tracks in a different order, to a silent and edited version of For All Mankind, closer to the original conception than the released version of the film. A revised version was performed twice at the 2010 Brighton Festival, where Eno was guest artistic director, before subsequent touring in the UK, Ireland and mainland Europe.

Due to the heavily processed nature of the studio-based sound on the original tracks, an exact reproduction would have been impossible to reproduce in a live context, so Woojun Lee chose to apply a free interpretation of the sound world and to make an impression of the original tracks through use of Icebreaker’s instrumental resources.

The performances from Brighton were recorded and an album of the live interpretation was released in June 2012 (source : “Wikipedia”).

External Links 

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Brian Eno – “Apollo – Atmospheres And Soundtracks” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Brian Eno – “An Ending Ascent” Audio/Video file on Last Fm

Brian Eno Artist’s Homepage

Brian Eno Artist’s Page on Facebook

Brian Eno Artist’s Page on Twitter

Brian Eno – Full Albums Download Links on Lágrima Psicodélica

 

Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) The Blues Project – “Flute Thing”

Blues Project – “Flute Thing” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Band :

The Blues Project  (Greenwich Village, New York, U.S.A.)

The Blues Project Band’s Photo

Image result for poster

The Blues Project is a band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and originally split up in 1967. Their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles. They are most remembered as one of the most artful practitioners of pop music, influenced as it was by folk, blues, rhythm & blues, jazz and the pop music of the day.

Track :

“Flute Thing” (written by Al Kooper) B3 track included on the album “Projections”

Album :

“Projections” released on Verve Folkways (FT-3008) in 1966

Projections is the second album by American blues rock band The Blues Project. Produced by Tom Wilson and released by Verve/Folkways in November 1966, the album was their first studio release and examined a more rock-based sound. Jim Marshall was credited as the photographer of the album cover.

Soon after the release of this album, Al Kooper left the band in the spring of 1967 to form Blood, Sweat & Tears.

Recording :

Keyboardist and vocalist Al Kooper was the most prominent member of the band, having recently played on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. However, Projections was very much a group effort, developing the band’s unique style that drew upon blues, jazz, folk, soul, and psychedelic influences.

Kooper’s energetic arrangement of “I Can’t Keep From Crying” incorporated psychedelic and gospel elements. “Steve’s Song”, the first song ever written by guitarist Steve Katz, was intended to be titled “September Fifth”, but a miscommunication between MGM Records and the band’s manager resulted in the generic title used for the release. It features a baroque introduction featuring flute playing from Andy Kulberg. “Two Trains Running” was guitarist Danny Kalb’s tribute to Muddy Waters, one of the band’s biggest influences. This 11-minute rendition is significantly different from the original version and was developed as the band played it live. On the Projections version, one of Kalb’s guitar strings went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up, without the band stopping. “Wake Me, Shake Me” came from a traditional gospel song and was a vehicle for improvisation that the band often used to close their live shows. Kooper’s jazz-rock instrumental “Flute Thing” features a prominent flute lick played by Kulberg, as well as solos from Kooper, Kalb, and drummer Roy Blumenfeld.

According to Danny Kalb, the record company was not interested in the band’s artistic merit and “just wanted to make a few bucks”. The band was disappointed by this lack of creative input and did not see the album cover or hear the mix until the record was released.

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

Band Members :

Danny Kalb – guitar, vocals

Al Kooper – keyboards, vocals

Steve Katz – guitar, harmonica, vocals, bass (track 7)

Andy Kulberg – bass, flute

Roy Blumenfeld – drums

Companies :

Record Company – MGM Records

Record Company – Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.

Published By – Sealark Enterprises

Published By – Blues Projections

Published By – Snapper Music

Published By – Arc Music (2)

Published By – Metric Music

Published By – Conrad Music

Manufactured By – MGM Records Division

Credits :

Design [Cover] – Ken Kendall

Engineer [Director] – Val Valentin

Liner Notes – Sid Bernstein

Photography By [Cover] – Jim Marshall (3)

Producer – Marcus James (2) (tracks: B3, B5), Tom Wilson (2)

Supervised By [Production Supervisor] – Jerry Schoenbaum

Track-list :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:48
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 5:20
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:35
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 12:19
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:16
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:33
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 5:59
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:12
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:29
10.Love Will Endure (Patrick Lynch, Patrick Sky) – 2:19

Mono Album :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:26
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 4:58
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:17
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 11:34
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:19
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:38
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 6:02
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:18
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:33
10.When There’s Smoke, There’s Fire (A. Kooper, I. Levine, B. Brass) – 2:34
11.No Time Like The Right Time (Al Kooper) – 2:44

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)/track-list photo

Information about the album/band/track :

“Last Fm”

The Blues Project was a short-lived band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and split up in 1967. While their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles, they are most remembered as one of the earliest practitioners of psychedelic rock, as well as one of the world’s first jam bands, along with the Grateful Dead.

In 1964, Elektra Records produced a compilation album of various artists entitled The Blues Project which featured several white musicians from the Greenwich Village area who played acoustic blues music in the style of black musicians. One of the featured artists on the album was a young guitarist named Danny Kalb, who was paid $75 for his two songs. Not long after the album’s release, however, Kalb gave up his acoustic guitar for an electric one. The Beatles’ arrival in America earlier in the year signified the end of the folk and acoustic blues movement that had swept young America in the early 1960s. The ensuing British Invasion was the nail in the coffin. Seeing the writing on the wall, Kalb gave up acoustic blues and switched to rock and roll, as did many other aspiring American musicians during this period.

Danny Kalb’s first rock and roll band was formed in the spring of 1965, playing under various names at first, until finally settling on the Blues Project moniker as an allusion to Kalb’s first foray on record. After a brief hiatus in the summer months of 1965 during which Kalb was visiting Europe, the band reformed in September 1965 and were almost immediately a top draw in Greenwich Village. By this time, the band included Danny Kalb on guitar, Steve Katz (having recently departed the Even Dozen Jug Band) also on guitar, Andy Kulberg on bass and flute, Roy Blumenfeld on drums and Tommy Flanders on vocals.

The band’s first big break came only a few weeks later when they auditioned for Columbia Records, and failed. The audition was a success, nevertheless, as it garnered them an organist in session musician Al Kooper. Kooper had begun his career as a session guitarist, but that summer, he began playing organ when he sneaked into the “Like a Rolling Stone” recording session on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. In order to improve his musicianship on the new instrument, Kooper joined the Blues Project and began gigging with them almost immediately.

Soon thereafter, the Blues Project gained a record contract from Verve Records, and began recording their first album live at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village over the course of a week in November 1965. While the band was known for their lengthy interpretations of blues and traditional rock and roll songs (making them, along with the Grateful Dead, rock’s first “jam band”), their first album saw them rein in these tendencies because of record company wariness as well as the time restrictions of the vinyl record.

Entitled simply Live at the Café Au Go Go, the album was finished with another week of live recordings at the cafe in January 1966. By that time, vocalist Tommy Flanders had left the band and was not replaced. As a result, Flanders appears on only a few of the songs on this album.

The album was a moderate success and the band toured America to promote it. While in San Francisco in April 1966, during the height of the city’s Haight-Ashbury culture, the Blues Project played at the Fillmore Auditorium to rave reviews. Seemingly New York’s answer to the Grateful Dead, even members of the Grateful Dead who saw them play were impressed with their improvisational abilities.

Returning to New York, the band recorded their second album and first studio album in the fall of 1966, and it was released in November. Arguably better than their first album, Projections was certainly more ambitious than their first album, boasting an eclectic set of songs that ran the gamut from blues, R&B, jazz, psychedelia, and folk-rock. The centerpiece of the album was an 11-and-a-half minute version of “Two Trains Running”, which, along with other songs on the album, showed off their improvisational tendencies. One such song was the instrumental, “Flute Thing”, written by Kooper and featuring Kulberg.

Soon after the album was completed, though, the band began to fall apart. Al Kooper quit the band in the spring of 1967, and the band without him completed a third album, Live At Town Hall. Despite the name, only one song was recorded live at Town Hall, while the rest was made up of live recordings from other venues, or of studio outtakes with overdubbed applause to feign a live sound.

The Blues Project’s last hurrah was at the Monterey International Pop Festival held in Monterey, California, in June 1967. By this time, however, half the original line-up was gone and most of their early magic was, too. Al Kooper had formed his own band and played at the festival as well, but no sort of reunion was in the offing. Guitarist Steve Katz left soon thereafter, followed by founder Danny Kalb. A fourth album, 1968’s Planned Obsolescence, featured only drummer Roy Blumenfeld and bassist Andy Kulberg from the original lineup. Upon the album’s completion, the remaining members formed Seatrain.

In 1968, Al Kooper and Steve Katz joined forces once again to fulfill a desire of Al Kooper’s to form a rock band with a horn section. The resulting band was Blood, Sweat & Tears. While Kooper led the band on its first album, Child Is Father to the Man, he did not stick around for any subsequent releases. Katz, on the other hand, remained with the band into the 1970s.

The Blues Project, with a modified lineup, reformed briefly in the early 1970s, releasing three further albums: 1971’s Lazarus, 1972’s The Blues Project, and 1973’s Original Blues Project Reunion In Central Park (which featured Al Kooper but not Tommy Flanders). These albums did little to excite the public, however. Since then, the group’s activity has been confined to a few sporadic reunion concerts.

“Rockasteria Blog”

The Blues Project can be defined by those who know and understand music in different and interesting ways. I describe it as a work of determination! Take these five young musicians and their struggles of this past year; they made it without the aid of a ‘single on the charts’ and despite the economics of an almost unbroken law that says, “no hit record, you don’t survive.” But with these young men, you find that there is an exception to the rule.
The struggle has not been an easy one, and it is far from over. But— they are going to ‘make it!’ Witness their exciting performances at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich  Village…. the three times they played at Central Park this past summer to SRO crowds. These are the dates that made possible the healthy ‘underground’ movement, the ever-growing grapevine that has led them to dates in San Francisco and concerts in colleges that included Rutgers, Boston U., Kent, Ithaca, Brandeis, Hobart, CCNY, Grinnell, and others. People are subscribing to the music and the originality of the Project.
On a recent trip to Hawaii, I was asked by a number of students, “When will The Blues Project be coming over?” It would not be surprising to find students in Europe and Asia asking the same question. The word is out, it is inevitable that whatever roads the words travel, the group, its music, and its station wagon will be sure to follow. Expect them to appear anywhere.
They have something to say. The world wants to listen to music—wants love and hope…and this is what The Blues Project is projecting— Love, Hope and a determination to make their sounds meaningful and lasting.
by Sid Bernstein (sometime ’round 1966)
“All Music”
One of the first album-oriented, “underground” groups in the United States, the Blues Project offered an electric brew of rock, blues, folk, pop, and even some jazz, classical, and psychedelia during their brief heyday in the mid-’60s. It’s not quite accurate to categorize them as a blues-rock group, although they did plenty of that kind of material; they were more like a Jewish-American equivalent to British bands like the Yardbirds, who used a blues and R&B base to explore any music that interested them. Erratic songwriting talent and a lack of a truly outstanding vocalist prevented them from rising to the front line of ’60s bands, but they recorded plenty of interesting material over the course of their first three albums, before the departure of their most creative members took its toll.

The Blues Project was formed in Greenwich Village in the mid-’60s by guitarist Danny Kalb (who had played sessions for various Elektra folk and folk-rock albums), Steve Katz (a guitarist with Elektra’s Even Dozen Jug Band), flutist/bassist Andy Kulberg, drummer Roy Blumenfeld, and singer Tommy Flanders. Al Kooper, in his early twenties a seasoned vet of rock sessions, joined after sitting in on the band’s Columbia Records audition, although they ended up signing to Verve, an MGM subsidiary. Early member Artie Traum (guitar) dropped out during early rehearsals; Flanders would leave after their first LP, Live at the Cafe Au-Go-Go(1966).The eclectic résumés of the musicians, who came from folk, jazz, blues, and rock backgrounds, was reflected in their choice of material. Blues by Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry tunes ran alongside covers of contemporary folk-rock songs by Eric Anderson and Patrick Sky, as well as the group’s own originals. These were usually penned by Kooper, who had already built songwriting credentials as the co-writer of Gary Lewis’ huge smash “This Diamond Ring,” and established a reputation as a major folk-rock shaker with his contributions to Dylan’s mid-’60s records. Kooper also provided the band’s instrumental highlights with his glowing organ riffs.

The live debut sounds rather tame and derivative; the group truly hit their stride on Projections (late 1966), which was, disappointingly, their only full-length studio recording. While they went through straight blues numbers with respectable energy, they really shone best on the folk and jazz-influenced tracks, like “Fly Away,” Katz’s lilting “Steve’s Song,” Kooper’s jazz instrumental “Flute Thing” (an underground radio standard that’s probably their most famous track), and Kooper’s fierce adaptation of an old Blind Willie Johnson number, “I Can’t Keep from Crying.” A non-LP single from this era, the pop-psychedelic “No Time Like the Right Time,” was their greatest achievement and one of the best “great hit singles that never were” of the decade.

The band’s very eclecticism didn’t augur well for their long-term stability, and in 1967 Kooper left in a dispute over musical direction (he has recalled that Kalb opposed his wishes to add a horn section). Then Kalb mysteriously disappeared for months after a bad acid trip, which effectively finished the original incarnation of the band. A third album, Live at Town Hall, was a particularly half-assed project given the band’s stature, pasted together from live tapes and studio outtakes, some of which were overdubbed with applause to give the impression that they had been recorded in concert.

Kooper got to fulfill his ambitions for soulful horn rock as the leader of the original Blood, Sweat & Tears, although he left that band after their first album; BS&T also included Katz (who stayed onboard for a long time). Blumenfeld and Kulberg kept the Blues Projectgoing for a fourth album before forming Seatrain, and the group re-formed in the early ’70s with various lineups, Kooper rejoining for a live 1973 album, Reunion in Central Park. The first three albums from the Kooper days are the only ones that count, though; the best material from these is on Rhino’s best-of compilation.

“Ultimate Classic Rock”

The classic lineup of the Blues Project came together in 1965 in New York’s Greenwich Village. The band featured Roy Blumenfeld (drums), Danny Kalb (guitar and vocals), Steve Katz (guitar and vocals), Al Kooper (keyboards and vocals) and Andy Kulberg (bass and flute). Projections, released in November 1966, displayed the band’s jazz, blues, folk and rock roots. Produced by Tom Wilson, it was the Blues Project’s first studio album, the follow-up to 1965’s Live at the Café au Go Go.

By 1967, after one more LP, the band began to splinter. Kooper and Katz went on to form Blood, Sweat & Tears. Blumenfeld and Kulberg, who died in 2002, formed Seatrain. Kalb continued with various lineups of the Blues Project until the early ’70s, when he emerged as a solo artist.

In exclusive interviews, the four surviving members of the Blues Project shared the stories behind the original tracks and re-arrangements that became Projections. “From what I remember, the process was, do we have enough songs?” says Katz. “I think we just had enough to do the album.”

“I Can’t Keep From Crying”
Al KOOPER: I didn’t mind “I Can’t Keep From Crying.” I didn’t mind that version. It’s an old blues song and I sort of rearranged it.

DANNY KALB: I just listened to it the other day, and there were different times during the last 40 years when I thought maybe I didn’t like what he did with it. But now I don’t feel that.  Now I feel that he took it somewhere else. And the raw energy of that tune, even though it turned to love lyrics, the love lyrics are unimportant because it’s a psychedelic adventure and a powerful gospel song together. And it makes sense.

“Steve’s Song”
STEVE KATZ: I wrote this song, the first song that I ever wrote. I called it “September Fifth.” It wasn’t even Sept. 5 yet, I just wanted to see what happened on that day. It was like a psychedelic love song. We tagged on a little baroque thing that I had written at the beginning.

AL KOOPER: When we were first putting it together, Steve and Andy came up with the intro. And Andy really wanted to play more flute, so it was a good opportunity for him to play the flute in the intro. And it worked perfectly. And what Roy was playing in the intro was really great too, arrangement-wise. I love that intro.

ROY BLUMENFELD: Andy had turned me on to Dances From Terpsichord and these little medieval drum things and stuff. So I got into that a bit. That one kind of evolved over time as we played, as it should be. We played together, that’s how it changed and developed, the intro to the tune. ‘Cause without that intro, it would have just had that … and the drum roll in. There was that sort of tension-release, what’s gonna happen next. It became an interesting sonic experience.

STEVE KATZ: I’m flat in a couple of places. I tried to do my vocal over again, and Tom Wilson said there wasn’t enough time because Eric Burdon was coming in. We were strictly by three-hour sessions and that was pretty much it. There may have been a couple of sessions that were back-to-back but it was no longer than six. We were kicked out of the studio when our sessions were finished. They didn’t really have too much faith in us, I guess. We were on the road and, of course, there were no cellphones in those days. MGM calls our manager [Jeff Chase], who is like a total idiot, and they said, “We have the artwork, we have the master tapes, but we’re missing the name of the second song on the first side.” So Jeff goes, “Second song, first side? Second song, first side? Oh, that’s Steve’s song.” They said, “Thanks, Jeff” and hung up. We get off the road a week later and I’m looking at proofs and I said, “What the hell is ‘Steve’s Song’?”

“You Can’t Catch Me”
ROY BLUMENFELD: That was a Chuck Berry tune. That one had a really cool kind of groove to it that we got into. Danny did a real sterling job of knockin’ that one out of the park when he would do it. He sung with sincerity and meaning. And that to me really trumps some kind of vocal gymnastics that people do that really don’t have that sense of connective, organic meaning to the lyrics and to the words. So I’ve gotta hand it to Danny on all that, it’s very authentic in that sense.

DANNY KALB: I always loved Chuck Berry, and he was one of my first influences as I started listening to rock ‘n’ roll, which I did early. I had a group in college, two kind of working class Italian guys and two Jewish middle class guys. It was called the Gay Notes – before gay was gay, you know? [Laughs] And we used to play Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, the great ’50s rock ‘n’ roll and we weren’t bad, we weren’t bad.

AL KOOPER: Very early in our career we backed up Chuck Berry at Town Hall in New York. It was one of our first big gigs. We opened for him and then we backed him up. It was nerve-wracking because he was very difficult to work with. Fortunately I knew all the songs so he didn’t give me any s—. He was very tough. So the rehearsal was scary. Not for me though. Also I had played rock ‘n’ roll shows in my early career when I was in the Royal Teens. I played a lot of rock ‘n’ roll shows where there were 14 bands on the bill and everybody played a couple of songs. Alan Freed shows, stuff like that. Not only was I raised on that but I also participated in it. You can stand in the wings and watch Jackie Wilson and Buddy Holly. It was unbelievable. I’ll never forget that. I used to go as a spectator in ’56 and ’57 and by ’58 and ’59, I was in the Royal Teens and so I was playing in those shows. It was a head-f— for me. It was unbelievable. It’s like God reached down and touched me.

“Two Trains Running”
STEVE KATZ: It was Danny’s tribute to Muddy Waters. Danny lived for Muddy Waters, which is sort of understandable given how wonderful, how monumental Muddy and some of his songs were. And that was one of his most monumental songs.

AL KOOPER: We started playing it and as we became a better band it became a better arrangement. And there were amazing things in it. It was a really great arrangement. It’s nothing like the Muddy Waters version.

DANNY KALB: It’s one of the great things done by any blues band there is, white or black. And we’re going through it and it’s powerful, it’s like a rock opera but short. And it’s Muddy Waters. But it’s also us. And it’s also showing that America was going down the road through music and a lot of other things of integration. The music was making people take a second look at the hatred.

AL KOOPER: What’s really funny is on the version that’s on the album, Danny’s string went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up. It was fabulous, we didn’t have to stop. Normally you would stop. But he made it part of the arrangement. That was a great moment.

DANNY KALB: We were up there in the studio and there’s magic in the air. We were right before the end and I hit one bad note, but I quickly made the bad note into a good note in a quarter of a second. And the thing comes together and ends right and we’ve got a masterpiece.

STEVE KATZ: There was no creativity on the engineers. They were busy setting up for Eric Burdon. They probably were bringing in microphones while we were doing our take.

DANNY KALB: I’d been playing it for a long time. I was a folk guitarist and a blues guitarist. I studied with the great Dave Van Ronk, he was my teacher. Dave was one of the greatest. A great blues singer, a great teacher and a great soul. He died a few years ago. He changed my life, he changed [Bob] Dylan’s life. We always gave tribute to our mentors. When we played on the same bill as Muddy Waters, who was our hero, a top man, we did “Two Trains Running.” After the show, his band was packing up, the show was over and I was packing up and I saw Muddy leaving the Café au Go Go and I had to find out, in my deepest part, what he thought of our version of this tune that started out in the South many years ago, before he recorded it with any electric band. And these strange white people were doing this song. What was that about? So right before Muddy opened the door to go, I went up to Muddy Waters and I said to him, “Mr. Waters — well, what did you think?” And I knew at that point that he knew what I was asking him. And he said to me, “You really got to me.” If I had died then, it would have been enough.

“Wake Me Shake Me”
AL KOOPER: There used to be a nightclub that the mob owned on 47th between Seventh and Eighth. It was called the Sweet Chariot. And it was a gospel nightclub. So they only had gospel people playing there, and the waitresses were dressed as angels. And when you walked in, they gave you a tambourine to play and then you’d leave it when you left. Now I had picked up on gospel music at a very early age because of people that I went to school with when I was like 13, 14. They turned me on to gospel music. So it was a big part of my life. So this group the Golden Chords that played at the Sweet Chariot floored me with their version of “Wake Me Shake Me.” It was so good that I couldn’t do it with the Blues Project because I knew that we couldn’t do it as good as they did. So I had to come up with my own arrangement. But it worked out very well because the band got into it and everybody played great stuff. So it was really good and it gave us a lot of room to improvise live. So it became our closer. We’d close with it. And it was a big song for us. But that’s where it came from. It’s a traditional gospel song.

DANNY KALB: Al did his own thing with it, and that’s the way it happens in music. Nothing comes from fresh air. You go to what’s useful to you. Dylan does that. Everybody does that.

“Cheryl’s Going Home”
DANNY KALB: That was a song by another composer, Bob Lind, I just listened to recently. The Blues Project version is excellent, Bob Lind’s version is excellent, it’s the best of both worlds.

STEVE KATZ: He had a hit record with “Elusive Butterfly.” I guess I had a Bob Lind album or the single, and I liked the B-side and thought it would be good for us to do. But it was an awful mix.

“Flute Thing”
AL KOOPER: One of the first rehearsals that we had as a band, Andy said to me, “I also play flute and I would like to play some flute with the band if you have anything or if you could write something where we could do that, it would be great for me.” And so I had this lick, a cadenza played by Barney Kessel as the ending lick of a song. I learned it in the late ’50s on guitar and played it more than I should have. And so that lick came to me and I thought, “That would sound great on the flute. Why don’t I just do that [demonstrates first part] and then I just needed [demonstrates second part] and I had a song for Andy.”

ROY BLUMENFELD: The lead-up to the song “Flute Thing,” that became the Muzak to a lot of folks’ acid trips out there on the West Coast. It was, so to speak, their metaphoric elevator. The tune itself started to become more of a featured flute tune. Al had a solo, Danny had a solo, Steve laid down the bass line, he wasn’t really a bass player per se. And I had a solo. My solo came after Al’s. I became inspired by a lot of very cool jazz drummers that I was listening to. I was also listening to a lot of jazz and early on, a year or two before, I’d visit Al at his apartment in New York and he had a wall of albums, long-playing records. He’d go to one, he’d pull one out, like “Salt Peanuts.” He’d play me these different tunes, go, “Check this out.” He was really inspiring me to look into other drum ideas and listen to the players because I was growing rapidly as a player and listening to a lot of stuff.

AL KOOPER: We had to play it a certain way that was more jazzy than rock ‘n’ roll. But it just showed that we can do that. So I didn’t think it was a bad thing. But I mean if you were a good jazz player and you listened to that track, you would probably go vomit. But we did the best we could and it wasn’t so bad. Considering that we were 22 or something.

“Caress Me Baby”
DANNY KALB: I think that was a good version of that Jimmy Reed song. You have to do Jimmy Reed your own way. And the great thing about the Blues Project is that’s what we did. We’re not an imitating-kind of band even though we used other people’s material very often. But just because you write your own songs, unless you’re a great songwriter like Dylan or someone like that, doesn’t mean that all your songs are great just because you wrote them. I believe in that. I believe in writing songs and I encourage it. But we were a great band. That’s all I want to say.

“Fly Away”
AL KOOPER: It’s a song I wrote about my first marriage. And I had a good arrangement for it, which my first marriage could have used. So it was easy for us to do because I just showed everybody what to play. It’s one of those ones where the arrangement was equal if not better than the song. It was a really good arrangement. And so there’s no holes in it. I think it really helped to make it work and we were all really playing together. Everybody’s playing exactly what they should play. There’s no bad parts in it. What was I influenced by? Probably more Dylan in the verses. I would say Dylan in the verses and the chorus was pretty original. I didn’t take that from anybody. Except in the arrangement there’s maybe a little “Down in the Boondocks.”

DANNY KALB: Unfortunately, the record company just wanted to make a few bucks. They were not interested in the artists, and on the back of Projections, one of the great albums of the ’60s, I don’t think our names are on it. That’s criminal.

STEVE KATZ: I have to say that our record company was really awful. There were things like that that were missed. From changing the name of my song, from not giving us enough studio time, not putting our names on it. There were just a lot of mistakes. There always were with Verve Folkways. It was awful.

AL KOOPER: We never saw the cover until it was in the store, and all stuff like that. We had zero control. We never heard the mixes ’till it was in the store.

DANNY KALB: I think that the way the Blues Project has been either forgotten or dissed is disgraceful. We were one of the most exciting bands in the period. We took big chances, spiritually and musically, and this is crap.

Photos related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (front)

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The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)

 THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS 2 (2)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (A’ Side)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (B’ Side)

Photos related to the band :

Image result for blues project

The Blues Project Matrix Concert Poster, 1966

Staples Concert Event Poster 1967 by Dave Withers

THE BLUES PROJECT POSTER 1 (2)

American band The Blues Project in concert at the Cafe Au Go Go, a nightclub in Greenwich Village, New York City, circa 1965. Singer Danny Kalb is in the centre. (Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

The Blues Project : News Photo

Psychedelic blues-rock band The Blues Project (l-r Danny Kalb, Steve Katz, Al Kooper, Roy Blumenfeld, Andy Kulberg) perform at the Cafe Au Go Go in June, 1967 in New York City, New York. (Photo by David Gahr/Getty Images)

Blues Project At The Cafe Au Go Go In NYC  : News Photo

The Blues Project, Monterey, 1967

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Image result for the blues project 1966

Links related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Napster”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Willie Said”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Article on the album on “The Music Court”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album’s Review/Article about the band on “Best Classic Bands”

 

Links related to the band :

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Facebook”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Google Play”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Deezer”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Tidal”

Steve Katz (The Blues Project) Interview on “Keep The Blues Alive”

Al Kooper (The Blues Project) Artist’s Interview on “Rock Of Ages”

 

Drone, Electronic, Krautrock, Psychedelic, Space Rock Germany 2000s/2010s (Tracks) Electric Orange – “Chorg (cpt gyrok’s)”

Electric Orange – “Chorg (cpt gyrok’s)” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Drone, Electronic, Krautrock, Psychedelic, Space Rock Germany 2000s/2010s (Tracks) 

Band :

Electric Orange (Aachen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany)

Members :
Dirk Jan Müller, Dirk Bittner, Tom Rückwald, Silvio Franolic, Josef Ahns
Related Artists :
Bloop, Mental Rape
Electric Orange Band’s Photo
ELECTRIC ORANGE 2 (3)

Track :

“Chorg (cpt gyrok’s)” (written by ) B1 track included on the album “Krautrock From Hell”

Album :

“Krautrock From Hell” released on Sulatron Records ( st 1001) in 2010

Image result for krautrock from hell electric orange

Electric Orange – “Krautrock From Hell” Full Album Video on YouTube

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

Dirk Bittner / guitars, percussion, tapes, vocals

Josef Ahns / guitars, flutes

Dirk Jan Müller / organ, piano, synth, Mellotron, tapes

Tom Rückwald / bass

Georg Monheim / drums, percussion

Credits :

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Sulatron-Records

Copyright (c) – Electric Orange

Recorded At – Studio Fleisch

Manufactured By – www.handlewithcare.de

Pressed By – Optimal Media Production – A988432

Mastered by – Eroc

Performer – Dirk Bittner, Dirk Jan Müller, Georg Monheim, Josef Ahns, Tom Rückwald

Photography By [Bandfoto] – Frank Lenemann

Producer [Produktion], Mixed By [Mix], Cover – Double D (14)

 

© 2009 by electric orange
℗ 2010 by sulatron-records

Track-list :

1. Bandwurm (5:44)
2. Sundos (5:00)
3. Chorg [Cpt. Gyrok’s] (10:51)
4. Hers (9:38)
5. Kunstkopf (6:29)
6. Neuronomicon (25:02)
7. Wurmloch (15:40)

Total Time: 78:24

ELECTRIC ORANGE 1 (2)

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Last Fm”

“Electric Orange is a german psychedelic band from Aachen. They are influenced by bands like Amon Düül II, Can and Ash Ra Tempel. Krautrock from hell is one way to call it and to give it a true name. Soft, psychedelic stoner rock is another. Electric Orange share a band history of almost twenty years jamming and exploring songs together. Their main focus is long, instrumental songs that leave a lot of space for improvisations and ebb and flow with their own internal tide. Song defined as a structural piece of music that comprehensively contains a certain idea put into notes, then Electric Orange overflow that definition again and again with yet another wave of improvisation or solo. Because that seems to be their vision: a boundless, overflowing and transcending rock experience that makes the mind flow on the fundament of the rhythm section together with the foreground improvisation instrument. Or in other words: psychedelia.”

“ProgArchives” 

ELECTRIC ORANGE is a german (neo) krautrock band, mainly based on two masterminds Dirk Jan Müller (keys) and Dirk Bittner (guitar). Up to now both musicians had uncounted collaborations during their development and produced a huge amount of material on MC, Vinyl and CD-R. Besides some temporary flirts with house/techno elements the band actually delivers modern trippy krautrock adapted music, where Tom Rückwald handles the bass guitar since the year 2000.

The sound is decorated with cheerful electronic elements adapted from Tangerine Dream or Popol Vuh as well as provided with obsessional rhythms in the vein of Can or even Kraftwerk – all you might expect as significant for a contemporary krautrock sound.

The band offer an irresistible blend of hypnotic and tribal beats, soaring organ and synths, spacey guitars, recitatives, samples as well as analogue effects. Hereby they are keen on experimenting with all sorts of rare, obscure and vintage instruments. The song titles are often provided with funny and thought-provoking puns.

In 2009 ELECTRIC ORANGE decided to offer the first DVD release ‘Live On The Psychedelic Network Festival 2007’ featuring a complete show from 2007 in Würzburg as well as other recordings from a period between 2005 and 2008. And then at the beginning of 2010 the band released the new production ‘Krautrock From Hell’ where the line up saw a change according to the drums while Silvio Franoli was substituted by Georg Monheim.

Soon after second guitarist Josef Ahns left the band as well. They decided to carry on as a quartet furthermore and once a year from now on a new album was produced, one of them including live recordings from Roadburn Festival in 2012.

Dirk Jan Müller and Dirk Bittner are also regular members of the band SPACE INVADERS.

Photos related to the album/band/track :

Electric Orange – “Krautrock From Hell” Album cover photo (front)

Image result for krautrock from hell electric orange

Electric Orange Band’s Photos

Untitled

ELECTRIC ORANGE 4 (2)

ELECTRIC ORANGE 3

 

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Untitled

Interview123Electric-orange.jpg

Interview_569_electric_orange.jpg

 

Related image

Links related to the album/band/track :

Electric Orange – “Krautrock From Hell” Full Album Video on YouTube

Electric Orange – “Krautrock From Hell” Full Album Audio Playlist on Bandcamp

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Spotify

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Discogs

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Bandcamp

Electric Orange Band’s Homepage

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Facebook

Electric Orange Band’s Page on Setlist Fm

Electric Orange Sulatron Records

Electric Orange/Adansonia Records Facebook Page

Electric Orange/Adansonia Records Homepage

Electric Orange Band’s Page/Full Albums Download Links on Music Bazaar

 

 

 

Ambient/Canterbury Scene, Electronic Music, Progressive Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Space Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff”

Steve Hillage Photo

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Ambient/Canterbury Scene/Electronic Music/Progressive/Psychedelic/Space Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks)

Artist :

Steve Hillage (London, U.K.)

Image result for steve hillage

Artist’s full name : Stephen Simpson Hillage

Also known as :

Simeon Sasparella, Steve Hillfish, The Steve Hillage Band

Member of :

Arzachel, Gong, Khan, Mirror System, Paragong, System 7

Track :

“The Glorious Om Riff” (written by Compagnie d’ Opera Invisible de Thibet, aka Gong)  B6 (closing track) included on the album “Green” 

“The Glorious OM Riff” is a remake of the song “Master Builder” from the Gong album You (1974), which Hillage had a hand in composing with the other members of Gong. The song is “a cacophonous blast, with masses of ear-splitting solos,” and it has been noted that “the seeds of [Hillage’s] future direction were sown here.

Album :

“Green” released on Virgin Records ( V 2098) in April 1978

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Green vinyl, packaged with embossed cover, printed insert sheet and poster included.

Printed in England by ROBOR LIMITED.

“A Celebration Of Time-Space Travel Through Nature”

Basic tracks recorded December 1977 at Ridge Farm, Dorking, Surrey.
Overdubs recorded January 1978 at Matrix Studio, London.
Overdubs and mixing February 1978 at Brittania Row Studio, London.

℗ 1978 Virgin Records Ltd.

Line-up/Credits :

Steve Hillage – Guitar, Synthesizer [Moog, Guitar], Vocals, Producer, Arranged By

With:

Miquette Giraudy / ARP & EMS synthesizers, vocoder, vocals

Curtis Robertson / bass

Joe Blocker / drums, percussion

Andy Anderson / drums (2,11,13)

Nick Mason / drums (7), co-producer

Dave Stewart / guitars (11,13)

Paul Francis / bass (11,13)

Christian Boule / guitars (12)

Phil Hodge / keyboards (12)

Basil Brooks / synthesizer (12)

Colin Bass / bass (12)

Clive Bunker / drums(12)

ArtWork: John Michell

Engineer – John Wood

Engineer [Assistant] – Andy Llewelyn, Malcolm Heeley

Producer – Nick Mason

Written-By – Bynum (tracks: B2), C.O.I.T. (tracks: B6), Robertson (tracks: B1, B2), Blocker (tracks: B2), Giraudy (tracks: A1 to B5), Hillage

Recorded At – Ridge Farm Studios

Overdubbed At – Matrix Studios

Overdubbed At – Britannia Row Studios

Mixed At – Britannia Row Studios

Printed By – Robor Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Virgin Records Ltd.

Copyright (c) – Virgin Music (Publishers) Ltd.

Track-List :

1. Sea-nature (6:43)
2. Ether Ships (5:02)
3. Musick Of The Trees (4:53)
4. Palm Trees (Love Guitar) (5:19)
5. Unidentified (Flying Being) (4:30)
6. U.F.O. Over Paris (3:11)
7. Leylines To Glassdom (4:06)
8. Crystal City (3:36)
9. Activation Meditation (1:03)
10. The Glorious Om Riff (7:46)

Total Time: 46:13

Bonus Tracks on 2007 Virgin Remaster:
11. Unidentified (Flying Being) (Live) (4:52)
12. Not Fade Away (Glid Forever) (Live)  (7:25)
13. Octave Doctors (Live *) (3:38)
14. Meditation Of The Snake (Alternative Mix) (3:16)

* Recorded at Glastonbury 1979
$ Recorded at The Rainbow Theatre 1977

Information about the album/artist/track :

Green is the fourth studio album by British progressive rock musician Steve Hillage. Written in spring 1977 at the same time as his previous album, the funk-inflicted Motivation Radio (1977), Green was originally going to be released as The Green Album as a companion to The Red Album (the originally intended name for Motivation Radio). However, this plan was dropped and after a US tour in late 1977, Green was recorded alone, primarily in Dorking, Surrey, and in London.

Produced and engineered by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason, Green features science fiction themes and explores electronic music, especially of a dance music bent, continuing the dance themes of Motivation Radio. Most of the guitar and some of the keyboard parts on Green were played by Hillage with a Roland GR 500–an early guitar synthesizer. Hillage enjoyed “the hybrid sounds” he achieved on the album with the instrument, but would retire the instrument as it was too problematic to use.

The album was released in 1978 by Virgin Records, originally as a limited edition translucent green vinyl before the standard version replaced it shortly afterwards. The album cover features a distinctive “pyramid fish” design by English writer John Michell. Green peaked at number 30 on the UK Albums Chart and was a critical success. Hillage pursued a more electronic direction after its release. Green was remastered for CD release in both 1990 and 2007.

On Steve Hillage’s 1978 release Green, the underground prog rock fan favorite issues more of his trademark thinking-man’s music. Fans of mid- to late-’70s Pink Floyd will want to check this album out, since it possesses many of the same musical qualities, due to the fact that it was produced by Floyd drummer Nick Mason, along with Hillage. Although not as consistent as some of his other albums, it certainly has its moments. Hillage’s recurring sci-fi influence is still felt in his music, especially on such tracks as “Sea Nature,” “UFO Over Paris,” and “Unidentified (Flying Being).” Hillage uses the same band that appeared on his Motivation Radio album, which helps make Hillage’s twisted songs even better (like his other albums, the musicianship is top-notch). Besides comparisons to Floyd, the album’s music is also similar to David Bowie‘s late-’70s experimental electronic phase (check out the track “Crystal City,” with vocals almost identical to Bowie). Hillage fans will definitely not be disappointed with Green.

Photos related to the album/artist/track :

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo 

STEVE HILLAGE GREEN 1 (2)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album cover photo (front)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album cover photo (back)

STEVE HILLAGE GREEN 2 (2).jpg

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (A’ Side)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (B’ Side)

 

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (A’ Side)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (B’ Side)

Steve Hillage -“Green” Album Artwork

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Steve Hillage -“Green” Album Artwork

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Steve Hillage Photo

STEVE HILLAGE 2 (2).jpg

Links related to the album/artist/track :

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Video file link on YouTube

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Spotify

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Google Play

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page/Full Albums/Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Steve Hillage – “Green” Full Album Download Link on Opium Hum Blog

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Discogs

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Rate Your Music

Steve Hillage Artist’s Homepage

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Progarchives

Steve Hillage Band/Gong Band’s Homepage

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Twitter

Steve Hillage Artist’s Interview on Rocktologist Website

Steve Hillage Artist’s Interview on Inner Views Website

Steve Hillage Band Band’s Page on Bandcamp

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on IMDb

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Apple Music

Steve Hillage Artist’s related shows on Mixcloud

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Setlist Fm

\Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Instagram

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on eBay

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fusion/Jazz Rock/Progressive Rock Denmark 1970s (Tracks) Secret Oyster – “Mind Movie”

Fusion/Jazz Rock/Progressive Rock Denmark 1970s (Tracks)

Secret Oyster (Copenhagen, Denmark)

Instrumental Music

“Mind Movie” (written by Karsten Vogel)  A2 track included on the album “Sea Son” 

Released on CBS Records ( CBS 80489), in 1974

Line-up/Credits :

Claus Bøhling / guitars
Kenneth Knudsen / piano, Moog
Karsten Vogel / alto & soprano saxes, organ
Jess Staehr / basses
Ole Streenberg / drums, percussion

With:
Finn Ziegler / violin (1,5)
Hans Nielsen / violin (1,5)
Bjarne Boie Rasmussen / viola (1,5)
Erling Christensen / cello (1,5)
Palle Mikkelborg / strings score & arrangements (1,5), trumpet (3,6)
Kasper Winding / congas & percussion (3)

Artwork: Peder Bundgaard

  • Phonographic Copyright (p) – CBS Inc.
  • Recorded At – Rosenberg Studio
  • Mixed At – Rosenberg Studio
  • Mastered At – Artisan Sound Recorders
  • Engineer – Freddy Hansson
  • Illustration, Art Direction – Peder Bundgaard
  • Photography By – Erik Bredahl
  • Producer – Poul Bruun

Recorded July 4-7 1974 and mixed September 16-19 1974 at Rosenberg Studios, Copenhagen.
℗ 1974 CBS, Inc.
Made in Holland.

The title is sometimes stated as “Sea Sun” though this mis-spelling only occurs on the spine.
Both front cover artwork and center label says “Sea Son”.

Track-List :

1. Oysterjungle (2:57)
2. Mind movie (9:14)
3. Pijamamafia (6:07)
4. Black mist (3:40)
5. Painforest (5:40)
6. Paella (8:23)

Total Time: 36:01

Bonus tracks on 2006 CD release:
7. Sea Son (5:25)
8. Alfresco – pt1 (5:39)
9. Alfresco – pt2 (2:07)

Founded in 1972 – Disbanded in 1977 – Regrouped in 2007

SECRET OYSTER became somewhat of a super group when members of BURNIN’RED IVANHOE, CORONARIAS DANS and HURDY GURDY formed this unit. By the end of BURNIN’ RED IVANHOE’s career (that spawned seven years), Karsten Vogel started forming a new band taking along with him BRI’s drummer Thrige and often jazz-partner bassist Vinding with him. Knowing from the Danish circuit guitarist Claus Bohling, he enticed him into the band that took its name from a track from BRI’s second album Secret Oysters Service. The last to join was keyboardist Knudsen, who had never played an electric instrument prior to entering this outfit, but was playing in a piano avant-garde trio. Knudsen would prove particularly helpful as the second songwriter of the group and allowing Vogel to leave the keyboards at will to play wind instruments.

Their sound recalled MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA, NUCLEUS, Herbie Hancock’s Mwandishi and Sextant albums as well as Miles DAVIS’s Bitches Brew. Quite a success and this prompted their record company to release that album internationally but under the title “Furtive Pearl”. After a line-up changze that saw the rhythm section get a complete overhaul (Staer for Vinding and Streenberg for Thrige) their second album, Sea Son, is even better but failed to get international public recognition, even if all connoisseur will mostly agree on this album being the band’s apex. At one point the line-up of this group was also exactly the same as BURNIN’ RED IVANHOE (after it got revived because they also developed rockier material) as well as a third outfit, “Day Of The Phoenix”. This did not stop them from writing the music to a ballet “Vidunderlinge Kaelling” released as an album under the name of “Astarte”, with very mixed results just a few months before their final album, the much better “Straight From The Krankenhaus” also known as “Orlander”.

Aside from their confusion of their album names and general discography, SECRET OYSTER is a great jazz-rock/fusion outfit that deserved a lot more attention for they were almost as good as the groups named above.

All four original albums have received a thorough and outstanding remastering with added bonus tracks on the great label Laser’s Edge. Secret Oyster got back together (Bohling, Vogel and Knudsen plus a new bassist and drummer) during the re-issues of their albums, touring the states and Denmark. Also maybe in the works, an un-released studio album (roots in the Astarte ballet deal) and a live album from these years could see the light of day in the following years.

Discography :

Secret Oyster (1974)
Sea Son (1975/2006)
Vidunderlige K?lling (1976)
Straight To The Krankenhaus (1977)
Secret Oyster – “Sea Son” Album cover photo (front)

SECRET OYSTER SEA SON

Secret Oyster – “Sea Son” Album photo (A’ Side)

 

Secret Oyster – “Sea Son” Album cover photo (back)

Secret Oyster, 1973

Secret Oyster 1973

Secret Oyster

Secret Oyster4

Secret Oyster

Secret Oyster6

Secret Oyster, 1974

Secret Oyster 1974

Secret Oyster

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Secret Oyster

Secret Oyster – “Mind Movie” Video file link on YouTube

Secret Oyster – “Sea Son” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Secret Oyster Band’s Page on Discogs

Secret Oyster Band’s Page on Facebook

Secret Oyster Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Karsten Vogel Artist’s Homepage

Secret Oyster -“Sea Son” Full Album Download Link on Trippy Jam Blog

Secret Oyster Band’s Page on Spotify

Secret Oyster Band’s Page on Apple Music

Secret Oyster – “Sea Son” Full Album Download Link on Rock Archeologia 60-70 Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambient/Electronic/Experimental/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen”

Ambient/Electronic/Experimental/Krautrock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Michael Rother (Hamburg, Germany)

Instrumental Music

Title Track

“Flammende Herzen” (written by Michael Rother) A1 (opening track) included on the album “Flammende Herzen”, his debut album as a solo artist.

Released on Polydor Records (2372 112) in March 1977

Line-up/Credits :

Michael Rother – Guitar, Electric Piano, Bass, Synthesizer, Organ, Electric Percussion, Producer

Jaki Liebezeit – Drums

Conny Plank – Producer, Engineering

Ann Weitz – Front Cover Photograph

Christian Rabe – Back Photo

Rike – Design

Mastered By  – G. F. Pfanz

Track List :

1.Flammende Herzen (07:03)
2.Zyklodrom (09:36)
3.Karussell (05:22)
4.Feuerland (07:06)
5.Zeni (05:09)

Bonustracks:
6.Flammende Herzen – Film Remix [1993]
7.Vorbei (Flammende Herzen – Chill Remix) [1993]

Member of :
Hallogallo 2010, Harmonia, Kraftwerk, NEU!, Spirits of Sound
Related Artists :
Herbert Grönemeyer, Jaki Liebezeit, Moebius, Conny Plank

Michael Rother (born 2 September 1950 in Hamburg, Germany) is a German experimental musician, best known for being a founding member of the band Neu!, and as a short-lived member of the band Kraftwerk.

Michael Rother was born in Germany in 1950. In the late ’60s, he played for a group called Spirits of Sound and also Wolfgang Flür. The latter group would later become Kraftwerk; Rother also played with Kraftwerk in 1971. That same year he went on to the band NEU! He recorded three albums with them during his four-year tenure. He also worked with Harmonia (with whom he released two albums) starting in 1973, running concurrently with several of his years in NEU! In 1976, he recorded with Brian Eno. The recording was released in 1997 under the moniker Harmonia 76. 1977 saw the release of Rother’s first solo album, entitled, Flammende Herzen. The following year Rother released his second solo album, Sterntaler. He followed that one up in 1979 with Katzenmusik. His next solo release would not be seen until 1982. This time the title was Fernwärme. The following year saw Rother releasing Lust. Süssherz und Tiefenschärfe, his sixth solo album, would be released in 1985. 1987 saw the follow-up to that one, it was entitled Traumreisen. His next solo album was not released until 1996. That one was called Esparanza.

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Album cover photo (front)

MICHAEL ROTHER FLAMMEND HERZEN 2

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Album photo (A’ Side)

MICHAEL ROTHER FLAMMENDE HERZEN 2

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Video file link on YouTube

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Spotify

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Discogs

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Facebook

Michael Rother Artist’s Homepage

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Perfect Sound Forever Online Magazine

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Wire

Michael Rother Artist’s Interview on Gigwise

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Apple Music

Michael Rother Artist’s Page on Google Play

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Download Link on Krautrock Maniac Blog

Michael Rother – “Flammende Herzen” Full Album Download Link on Opium Hum Blog

 

 

Fusion/Jazz Rock/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Multinational 1970s Sunbirds – “Spanish Sun”

Fusion/Jazz Rock/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Multinational 1970s

Sunbirds (Multinational, Austria, Germany, Holland, U.K., U.S.A.) Based in München, Bayern, Germany

Instrumental Music

“Spanish Sun” (written by -Ferdinand Povel, Philip Catherine, -Fritz Pauer, Jimmy Woode, Klaus Weiss) A3 track included on the album “Sunbirds”

Released on BASF Records ( 20 21110-2) in 1971

Related Artists :
Niagara
Also known as :
Klaus Weiss Sextet

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up:

Klaus Weiss – drums, Producer
Philip Catherine – guitar
Ferdinand Povel – flute, alto flute
Fritz Pauer – electra-piano ( Hohner Electra), organ
Jimmy Woode – electric & acoustic bass
Juan Romero – percussion

Recorded At – Union Studios, Munich

Recorded By – Reinhold Mack

Recorded 24 August 71 at Union Studios München, Germany.

Fritz Pauer used Hohner Electra-piano.
Klaus Weiss plays Slingerland drums and Avedis Zildjian Cymbals exclusively.
Track List :
01 Kwaeli (3:43)
02 Sunrise (5:26)
03 Spanish Sun (12:10)
04 Sunshine (6:46)
05 Sunbirds (9:31)
06 Blues For D.S. (7:53)
Bonus Tracks :
07 Dreams (9:42)
08 Fire Dance (6:54)
Sunbirds were a band project formed in 1971 by German drummer Klaus Weiss. (17/02/1942-10/12/2008) Weiss had already twelve years of career as a jazz drummer behind him in 1971 and was appreciated by US jazz men touring in Europe. He had played among others with Bud Powell, Johnny Griffin, Kenny Drew and Don Byas. From 1962 to 1965 he had worked with Klaus Doldinger and in 1966 Weiss won the International Jazz Competition in Vienna.
In 1971 he formed the multinational Klaus Weiss Quartet featuring American bassist Jimmy Woode, Dutch saxophonist Ferdinand Povel and Austrian pianist Fritz Pauer, The same musicians joined by Philip Catherine on guitar and Juan Romero on percussion recorded in august of 1971 the first self titled Sunbirds record. The record presented an interesting form of early jazz rock with an extensive use of electronic keyboards. One year later in august of 1972 the Sunbirds released their second record, Zagara, again the Klaus Weiss Quartet joined this time by Ron Carter on double bass, Leczek Zadlo on flute, Lucas Costa and Rafael Weber on guitar and Norman Tolbert on percussion. This record presented an orientation towards Latin Fusion.The first record is highly recommended.
On paper, The Sunbirds were a band more interesting for what the members did before and after the group’s brief lifetime that what they accomplished while they were together; only after their recordings received a belated release did it become obvious that this was group whose gifts far outstripped their public recognition. In 1986, after 28th Day had broken up following the departure of Barbara Manning, guitarist and singer Cole Marquis and drummer Mike Cloward decided to form a new band, and joined forces with Lawrence Crane, who’d been playing bass with Vomit Launch. Adopting the name The Sunbirds, the band started playing around their hometown of Chico, California and recorded a six-song demo tape. However, the band attracted little notice, and by the end of the year The Sunbirds were history. Marquis and Cloward went on to form The Downsiders, and Marquis later won a cult following with his solo work; Crane continued to perform with Vomit Launch, and later moved into the control room, working as a recording engineer and founding the acclaimed independent recording magazine TapeOp. The Sunbirds briefly reunited in 1997, recording another six-song demo; Paisley Pop Records combined the 1986 and 1997 sessions and released them as a 2003 album entitled No Sun No Shadow. In 2002, Crane reassembled the band to perform at a TapeOp magazine convention, and while all three members continue to make their own music, they have not ruled out working together again in the future.
Sunbirds – “Sunbirds” Album cover photo (front)
SUNBIRDS SUNBIRDS ALBUM PHOTO 1
Sunbirds Photo
SUNBIRDS PHOTO 2 (2)

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Discogs

Sunbirds – “Sunbirds” Full Album Download Link on Trippy Jam Blog

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

The 20 Best Krautrock Records Ever Made on Fact Magazine

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Krautrock Maniac

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Green Brain

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Apple Music

Sunbirds Band’s Page on Spotify

Sunbirds Band’s Interview on It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine Blog

Sunbirds – “Sunbirds” Personal Playlist on Spotify

Folk/Fusion/Jazz Rock/Krautrock/Progressive Rock/Space Rock Germany 1970s Personal Playlist on Spotify