Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) The Blues Project – “Flute Thing”

Blues Project – “Flute Thing” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Band :

The Blues Project  (Greenwich Village, New York, U.S.A.)

The Blues Project Band’s Photo

Image result for poster

The Blues Project is a band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and originally split up in 1967. Their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles. They are most remembered as one of the most artful practitioners of pop music, influenced as it was by folk, blues, rhythm & blues, jazz and the pop music of the day.

Track :

“Flute Thing” (written by Al Kooper) B3 track included on the album “Projections”

Album :

“Projections” released on Verve Folkways (FT-3008) in 1966

Projections is the second album by American blues rock band The Blues Project. Produced by Tom Wilson and released by Verve/Folkways in November 1966, the album was their first studio release and examined a more rock-based sound. Jim Marshall was credited as the photographer of the album cover.

Soon after the release of this album, Al Kooper left the band in the spring of 1967 to form Blood, Sweat & Tears.

Recording :

Keyboardist and vocalist Al Kooper was the most prominent member of the band, having recently played on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. However, Projections was very much a group effort, developing the band’s unique style that drew upon blues, jazz, folk, soul, and psychedelic influences.

Kooper’s energetic arrangement of “I Can’t Keep From Crying” incorporated psychedelic and gospel elements. “Steve’s Song”, the first song ever written by guitarist Steve Katz, was intended to be titled “September Fifth”, but a miscommunication between MGM Records and the band’s manager resulted in the generic title used for the release. It features a baroque introduction featuring flute playing from Andy Kulberg. “Two Trains Running” was guitarist Danny Kalb’s tribute to Muddy Waters, one of the band’s biggest influences. This 11-minute rendition is significantly different from the original version and was developed as the band played it live. On the Projections version, one of Kalb’s guitar strings went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up, without the band stopping. “Wake Me, Shake Me” came from a traditional gospel song and was a vehicle for improvisation that the band often used to close their live shows. Kooper’s jazz-rock instrumental “Flute Thing” features a prominent flute lick played by Kulberg, as well as solos from Kooper, Kalb, and drummer Roy Blumenfeld.

According to Danny Kalb, the record company was not interested in the band’s artistic merit and “just wanted to make a few bucks”. The band was disappointed by this lack of creative input and did not see the album cover or hear the mix until the record was released.

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

Band Members :

Danny Kalb – guitar, vocals

Al Kooper – keyboards, vocals

Steve Katz – guitar, harmonica, vocals, bass (track 7)

Andy Kulberg – bass, flute

Roy Blumenfeld – drums

Companies :

Record Company – MGM Records

Record Company – Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.

Published By – Sealark Enterprises

Published By – Blues Projections

Published By – Snapper Music

Published By – Arc Music (2)

Published By – Metric Music

Published By – Conrad Music

Manufactured By – MGM Records Division

Credits :

Design [Cover] – Ken Kendall

Engineer [Director] – Val Valentin

Liner Notes – Sid Bernstein

Photography By [Cover] – Jim Marshall (3)

Producer – Marcus James (2) (tracks: B3, B5), Tom Wilson (2)

Supervised By [Production Supervisor] – Jerry Schoenbaum

Track-list :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:48
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 5:20
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:35
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 12:19
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:16
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:33
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 5:59
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:12
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:29
10.Love Will Endure (Patrick Lynch, Patrick Sky) – 2:19

Mono Album :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:26
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 4:58
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:17
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 11:34
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:19
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:38
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 6:02
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:18
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:33
10.When There’s Smoke, There’s Fire (A. Kooper, I. Levine, B. Brass) – 2:34
11.No Time Like The Right Time (Al Kooper) – 2:44

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)/track-list photo

Information about the album/band/track :

“Last Fm”

The Blues Project was a short-lived band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and split up in 1967. While their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles, they are most remembered as one of the earliest practitioners of psychedelic rock, as well as one of the world’s first jam bands, along with the Grateful Dead.

In 1964, Elektra Records produced a compilation album of various artists entitled The Blues Project which featured several white musicians from the Greenwich Village area who played acoustic blues music in the style of black musicians. One of the featured artists on the album was a young guitarist named Danny Kalb, who was paid $75 for his two songs. Not long after the album’s release, however, Kalb gave up his acoustic guitar for an electric one. The Beatles’ arrival in America earlier in the year signified the end of the folk and acoustic blues movement that had swept young America in the early 1960s. The ensuing British Invasion was the nail in the coffin. Seeing the writing on the wall, Kalb gave up acoustic blues and switched to rock and roll, as did many other aspiring American musicians during this period.

Danny Kalb’s first rock and roll band was formed in the spring of 1965, playing under various names at first, until finally settling on the Blues Project moniker as an allusion to Kalb’s first foray on record. After a brief hiatus in the summer months of 1965 during which Kalb was visiting Europe, the band reformed in September 1965 and were almost immediately a top draw in Greenwich Village. By this time, the band included Danny Kalb on guitar, Steve Katz (having recently departed the Even Dozen Jug Band) also on guitar, Andy Kulberg on bass and flute, Roy Blumenfeld on drums and Tommy Flanders on vocals.

The band’s first big break came only a few weeks later when they auditioned for Columbia Records, and failed. The audition was a success, nevertheless, as it garnered them an organist in session musician Al Kooper. Kooper had begun his career as a session guitarist, but that summer, he began playing organ when he sneaked into the “Like a Rolling Stone” recording session on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. In order to improve his musicianship on the new instrument, Kooper joined the Blues Project and began gigging with them almost immediately.

Soon thereafter, the Blues Project gained a record contract from Verve Records, and began recording their first album live at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village over the course of a week in November 1965. While the band was known for their lengthy interpretations of blues and traditional rock and roll songs (making them, along with the Grateful Dead, rock’s first “jam band”), their first album saw them rein in these tendencies because of record company wariness as well as the time restrictions of the vinyl record.

Entitled simply Live at the Café Au Go Go, the album was finished with another week of live recordings at the cafe in January 1966. By that time, vocalist Tommy Flanders had left the band and was not replaced. As a result, Flanders appears on only a few of the songs on this album.

The album was a moderate success and the band toured America to promote it. While in San Francisco in April 1966, during the height of the city’s Haight-Ashbury culture, the Blues Project played at the Fillmore Auditorium to rave reviews. Seemingly New York’s answer to the Grateful Dead, even members of the Grateful Dead who saw them play were impressed with their improvisational abilities.

Returning to New York, the band recorded their second album and first studio album in the fall of 1966, and it was released in November. Arguably better than their first album, Projections was certainly more ambitious than their first album, boasting an eclectic set of songs that ran the gamut from blues, R&B, jazz, psychedelia, and folk-rock. The centerpiece of the album was an 11-and-a-half minute version of “Two Trains Running”, which, along with other songs on the album, showed off their improvisational tendencies. One such song was the instrumental, “Flute Thing”, written by Kooper and featuring Kulberg.

Soon after the album was completed, though, the band began to fall apart. Al Kooper quit the band in the spring of 1967, and the band without him completed a third album, Live At Town Hall. Despite the name, only one song was recorded live at Town Hall, while the rest was made up of live recordings from other venues, or of studio outtakes with overdubbed applause to feign a live sound.

The Blues Project’s last hurrah was at the Monterey International Pop Festival held in Monterey, California, in June 1967. By this time, however, half the original line-up was gone and most of their early magic was, too. Al Kooper had formed his own band and played at the festival as well, but no sort of reunion was in the offing. Guitarist Steve Katz left soon thereafter, followed by founder Danny Kalb. A fourth album, 1968’s Planned Obsolescence, featured only drummer Roy Blumenfeld and bassist Andy Kulberg from the original lineup. Upon the album’s completion, the remaining members formed Seatrain.

In 1968, Al Kooper and Steve Katz joined forces once again to fulfill a desire of Al Kooper’s to form a rock band with a horn section. The resulting band was Blood, Sweat & Tears. While Kooper led the band on its first album, Child Is Father to the Man, he did not stick around for any subsequent releases. Katz, on the other hand, remained with the band into the 1970s.

The Blues Project, with a modified lineup, reformed briefly in the early 1970s, releasing three further albums: 1971’s Lazarus, 1972’s The Blues Project, and 1973’s Original Blues Project Reunion In Central Park (which featured Al Kooper but not Tommy Flanders). These albums did little to excite the public, however. Since then, the group’s activity has been confined to a few sporadic reunion concerts.

“Rockasteria Blog”

The Blues Project can be defined by those who know and understand music in different and interesting ways. I describe it as a work of determination! Take these five young musicians and their struggles of this past year; they made it without the aid of a ‘single on the charts’ and despite the economics of an almost unbroken law that says, “no hit record, you don’t survive.” But with these young men, you find that there is an exception to the rule.
The struggle has not been an easy one, and it is far from over. But— they are going to ‘make it!’ Witness their exciting performances at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich  Village…. the three times they played at Central Park this past summer to SRO crowds. These are the dates that made possible the healthy ‘underground’ movement, the ever-growing grapevine that has led them to dates in San Francisco and concerts in colleges that included Rutgers, Boston U., Kent, Ithaca, Brandeis, Hobart, CCNY, Grinnell, and others. People are subscribing to the music and the originality of the Project.
On a recent trip to Hawaii, I was asked by a number of students, “When will The Blues Project be coming over?” It would not be surprising to find students in Europe and Asia asking the same question. The word is out, it is inevitable that whatever roads the words travel, the group, its music, and its station wagon will be sure to follow. Expect them to appear anywhere.
They have something to say. The world wants to listen to music—wants love and hope…and this is what The Blues Project is projecting— Love, Hope and a determination to make their sounds meaningful and lasting.
by Sid Bernstein (sometime ’round 1966)
“All Music”
One of the first album-oriented, “underground” groups in the United States, the Blues Project offered an electric brew of rock, blues, folk, pop, and even some jazz, classical, and psychedelia during their brief heyday in the mid-’60s. It’s not quite accurate to categorize them as a blues-rock group, although they did plenty of that kind of material; they were more like a Jewish-American equivalent to British bands like the Yardbirds, who used a blues and R&B base to explore any music that interested them. Erratic songwriting talent and a lack of a truly outstanding vocalist prevented them from rising to the front line of ’60s bands, but they recorded plenty of interesting material over the course of their first three albums, before the departure of their most creative members took its toll.

The Blues Project was formed in Greenwich Village in the mid-’60s by guitarist Danny Kalb (who had played sessions for various Elektra folk and folk-rock albums), Steve Katz (a guitarist with Elektra’s Even Dozen Jug Band), flutist/bassist Andy Kulberg, drummer Roy Blumenfeld, and singer Tommy Flanders. Al Kooper, in his early twenties a seasoned vet of rock sessions, joined after sitting in on the band’s Columbia Records audition, although they ended up signing to Verve, an MGM subsidiary. Early member Artie Traum (guitar) dropped out during early rehearsals; Flanders would leave after their first LP, Live at the Cafe Au-Go-Go(1966).The eclectic résumés of the musicians, who came from folk, jazz, blues, and rock backgrounds, was reflected in their choice of material. Blues by Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry tunes ran alongside covers of contemporary folk-rock songs by Eric Anderson and Patrick Sky, as well as the group’s own originals. These were usually penned by Kooper, who had already built songwriting credentials as the co-writer of Gary Lewis’ huge smash “This Diamond Ring,” and established a reputation as a major folk-rock shaker with his contributions to Dylan’s mid-’60s records. Kooper also provided the band’s instrumental highlights with his glowing organ riffs.

The live debut sounds rather tame and derivative; the group truly hit their stride on Projections (late 1966), which was, disappointingly, their only full-length studio recording. While they went through straight blues numbers with respectable energy, they really shone best on the folk and jazz-influenced tracks, like “Fly Away,” Katz’s lilting “Steve’s Song,” Kooper’s jazz instrumental “Flute Thing” (an underground radio standard that’s probably their most famous track), and Kooper’s fierce adaptation of an old Blind Willie Johnson number, “I Can’t Keep from Crying.” A non-LP single from this era, the pop-psychedelic “No Time Like the Right Time,” was their greatest achievement and one of the best “great hit singles that never were” of the decade.

The band’s very eclecticism didn’t augur well for their long-term stability, and in 1967 Kooper left in a dispute over musical direction (he has recalled that Kalb opposed his wishes to add a horn section). Then Kalb mysteriously disappeared for months after a bad acid trip, which effectively finished the original incarnation of the band. A third album, Live at Town Hall, was a particularly half-assed project given the band’s stature, pasted together from live tapes and studio outtakes, some of which were overdubbed with applause to give the impression that they had been recorded in concert.

Kooper got to fulfill his ambitions for soulful horn rock as the leader of the original Blood, Sweat & Tears, although he left that band after their first album; BS&T also included Katz (who stayed onboard for a long time). Blumenfeld and Kulberg kept the Blues Projectgoing for a fourth album before forming Seatrain, and the group re-formed in the early ’70s with various lineups, Kooper rejoining for a live 1973 album, Reunion in Central Park. The first three albums from the Kooper days are the only ones that count, though; the best material from these is on Rhino’s best-of compilation.

“Ultimate Classic Rock”

The classic lineup of the Blues Project came together in 1965 in New York’s Greenwich Village. The band featured Roy Blumenfeld (drums), Danny Kalb (guitar and vocals), Steve Katz (guitar and vocals), Al Kooper (keyboards and vocals) and Andy Kulberg (bass and flute). Projections, released in November 1966, displayed the band’s jazz, blues, folk and rock roots. Produced by Tom Wilson, it was the Blues Project’s first studio album, the follow-up to 1965’s Live at the Café au Go Go.

By 1967, after one more LP, the band began to splinter. Kooper and Katz went on to form Blood, Sweat & Tears. Blumenfeld and Kulberg, who died in 2002, formed Seatrain. Kalb continued with various lineups of the Blues Project until the early ’70s, when he emerged as a solo artist.

In exclusive interviews, the four surviving members of the Blues Project shared the stories behind the original tracks and re-arrangements that became Projections. “From what I remember, the process was, do we have enough songs?” says Katz. “I think we just had enough to do the album.”

“I Can’t Keep From Crying”
Al KOOPER: I didn’t mind “I Can’t Keep From Crying.” I didn’t mind that version. It’s an old blues song and I sort of rearranged it.

DANNY KALB: I just listened to it the other day, and there were different times during the last 40 years when I thought maybe I didn’t like what he did with it. But now I don’t feel that.  Now I feel that he took it somewhere else. And the raw energy of that tune, even though it turned to love lyrics, the love lyrics are unimportant because it’s a psychedelic adventure and a powerful gospel song together. And it makes sense.

“Steve’s Song”
STEVE KATZ: I wrote this song, the first song that I ever wrote. I called it “September Fifth.” It wasn’t even Sept. 5 yet, I just wanted to see what happened on that day. It was like a psychedelic love song. We tagged on a little baroque thing that I had written at the beginning.

AL KOOPER: When we were first putting it together, Steve and Andy came up with the intro. And Andy really wanted to play more flute, so it was a good opportunity for him to play the flute in the intro. And it worked perfectly. And what Roy was playing in the intro was really great too, arrangement-wise. I love that intro.

ROY BLUMENFELD: Andy had turned me on to Dances From Terpsichord and these little medieval drum things and stuff. So I got into that a bit. That one kind of evolved over time as we played, as it should be. We played together, that’s how it changed and developed, the intro to the tune. ‘Cause without that intro, it would have just had that … and the drum roll in. There was that sort of tension-release, what’s gonna happen next. It became an interesting sonic experience.

STEVE KATZ: I’m flat in a couple of places. I tried to do my vocal over again, and Tom Wilson said there wasn’t enough time because Eric Burdon was coming in. We were strictly by three-hour sessions and that was pretty much it. There may have been a couple of sessions that were back-to-back but it was no longer than six. We were kicked out of the studio when our sessions were finished. They didn’t really have too much faith in us, I guess. We were on the road and, of course, there were no cellphones in those days. MGM calls our manager [Jeff Chase], who is like a total idiot, and they said, “We have the artwork, we have the master tapes, but we’re missing the name of the second song on the first side.” So Jeff goes, “Second song, first side? Second song, first side? Oh, that’s Steve’s song.” They said, “Thanks, Jeff” and hung up. We get off the road a week later and I’m looking at proofs and I said, “What the hell is ‘Steve’s Song’?”

“You Can’t Catch Me”
ROY BLUMENFELD: That was a Chuck Berry tune. That one had a really cool kind of groove to it that we got into. Danny did a real sterling job of knockin’ that one out of the park when he would do it. He sung with sincerity and meaning. And that to me really trumps some kind of vocal gymnastics that people do that really don’t have that sense of connective, organic meaning to the lyrics and to the words. So I’ve gotta hand it to Danny on all that, it’s very authentic in that sense.

DANNY KALB: I always loved Chuck Berry, and he was one of my first influences as I started listening to rock ‘n’ roll, which I did early. I had a group in college, two kind of working class Italian guys and two Jewish middle class guys. It was called the Gay Notes – before gay was gay, you know? [Laughs] And we used to play Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, the great ’50s rock ‘n’ roll and we weren’t bad, we weren’t bad.

AL KOOPER: Very early in our career we backed up Chuck Berry at Town Hall in New York. It was one of our first big gigs. We opened for him and then we backed him up. It was nerve-wracking because he was very difficult to work with. Fortunately I knew all the songs so he didn’t give me any s—. He was very tough. So the rehearsal was scary. Not for me though. Also I had played rock ‘n’ roll shows in my early career when I was in the Royal Teens. I played a lot of rock ‘n’ roll shows where there were 14 bands on the bill and everybody played a couple of songs. Alan Freed shows, stuff like that. Not only was I raised on that but I also participated in it. You can stand in the wings and watch Jackie Wilson and Buddy Holly. It was unbelievable. I’ll never forget that. I used to go as a spectator in ’56 and ’57 and by ’58 and ’59, I was in the Royal Teens and so I was playing in those shows. It was a head-f— for me. It was unbelievable. It’s like God reached down and touched me.

“Two Trains Running”
STEVE KATZ: It was Danny’s tribute to Muddy Waters. Danny lived for Muddy Waters, which is sort of understandable given how wonderful, how monumental Muddy and some of his songs were. And that was one of his most monumental songs.

AL KOOPER: We started playing it and as we became a better band it became a better arrangement. And there were amazing things in it. It was a really great arrangement. It’s nothing like the Muddy Waters version.

DANNY KALB: It’s one of the great things done by any blues band there is, white or black. And we’re going through it and it’s powerful, it’s like a rock opera but short. And it’s Muddy Waters. But it’s also us. And it’s also showing that America was going down the road through music and a lot of other things of integration. The music was making people take a second look at the hatred.

AL KOOPER: What’s really funny is on the version that’s on the album, Danny’s string went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up. It was fabulous, we didn’t have to stop. Normally you would stop. But he made it part of the arrangement. That was a great moment.

DANNY KALB: We were up there in the studio and there’s magic in the air. We were right before the end and I hit one bad note, but I quickly made the bad note into a good note in a quarter of a second. And the thing comes together and ends right and we’ve got a masterpiece.

STEVE KATZ: There was no creativity on the engineers. They were busy setting up for Eric Burdon. They probably were bringing in microphones while we were doing our take.

DANNY KALB: I’d been playing it for a long time. I was a folk guitarist and a blues guitarist. I studied with the great Dave Van Ronk, he was my teacher. Dave was one of the greatest. A great blues singer, a great teacher and a great soul. He died a few years ago. He changed my life, he changed [Bob] Dylan’s life. We always gave tribute to our mentors. When we played on the same bill as Muddy Waters, who was our hero, a top man, we did “Two Trains Running.” After the show, his band was packing up, the show was over and I was packing up and I saw Muddy leaving the Café au Go Go and I had to find out, in my deepest part, what he thought of our version of this tune that started out in the South many years ago, before he recorded it with any electric band. And these strange white people were doing this song. What was that about? So right before Muddy opened the door to go, I went up to Muddy Waters and I said to him, “Mr. Waters — well, what did you think?” And I knew at that point that he knew what I was asking him. And he said to me, “You really got to me.” If I had died then, it would have been enough.

“Wake Me Shake Me”
AL KOOPER: There used to be a nightclub that the mob owned on 47th between Seventh and Eighth. It was called the Sweet Chariot. And it was a gospel nightclub. So they only had gospel people playing there, and the waitresses were dressed as angels. And when you walked in, they gave you a tambourine to play and then you’d leave it when you left. Now I had picked up on gospel music at a very early age because of people that I went to school with when I was like 13, 14. They turned me on to gospel music. So it was a big part of my life. So this group the Golden Chords that played at the Sweet Chariot floored me with their version of “Wake Me Shake Me.” It was so good that I couldn’t do it with the Blues Project because I knew that we couldn’t do it as good as they did. So I had to come up with my own arrangement. But it worked out very well because the band got into it and everybody played great stuff. So it was really good and it gave us a lot of room to improvise live. So it became our closer. We’d close with it. And it was a big song for us. But that’s where it came from. It’s a traditional gospel song.

DANNY KALB: Al did his own thing with it, and that’s the way it happens in music. Nothing comes from fresh air. You go to what’s useful to you. Dylan does that. Everybody does that.

“Cheryl’s Going Home”
DANNY KALB: That was a song by another composer, Bob Lind, I just listened to recently. The Blues Project version is excellent, Bob Lind’s version is excellent, it’s the best of both worlds.

STEVE KATZ: He had a hit record with “Elusive Butterfly.” I guess I had a Bob Lind album or the single, and I liked the B-side and thought it would be good for us to do. But it was an awful mix.

“Flute Thing”
AL KOOPER: One of the first rehearsals that we had as a band, Andy said to me, “I also play flute and I would like to play some flute with the band if you have anything or if you could write something where we could do that, it would be great for me.” And so I had this lick, a cadenza played by Barney Kessel as the ending lick of a song. I learned it in the late ’50s on guitar and played it more than I should have. And so that lick came to me and I thought, “That would sound great on the flute. Why don’t I just do that [demonstrates first part] and then I just needed [demonstrates second part] and I had a song for Andy.”

ROY BLUMENFELD: The lead-up to the song “Flute Thing,” that became the Muzak to a lot of folks’ acid trips out there on the West Coast. It was, so to speak, their metaphoric elevator. The tune itself started to become more of a featured flute tune. Al had a solo, Danny had a solo, Steve laid down the bass line, he wasn’t really a bass player per se. And I had a solo. My solo came after Al’s. I became inspired by a lot of very cool jazz drummers that I was listening to. I was also listening to a lot of jazz and early on, a year or two before, I’d visit Al at his apartment in New York and he had a wall of albums, long-playing records. He’d go to one, he’d pull one out, like “Salt Peanuts.” He’d play me these different tunes, go, “Check this out.” He was really inspiring me to look into other drum ideas and listen to the players because I was growing rapidly as a player and listening to a lot of stuff.

AL KOOPER: We had to play it a certain way that was more jazzy than rock ‘n’ roll. But it just showed that we can do that. So I didn’t think it was a bad thing. But I mean if you were a good jazz player and you listened to that track, you would probably go vomit. But we did the best we could and it wasn’t so bad. Considering that we were 22 or something.

“Caress Me Baby”
DANNY KALB: I think that was a good version of that Jimmy Reed song. You have to do Jimmy Reed your own way. And the great thing about the Blues Project is that’s what we did. We’re not an imitating-kind of band even though we used other people’s material very often. But just because you write your own songs, unless you’re a great songwriter like Dylan or someone like that, doesn’t mean that all your songs are great just because you wrote them. I believe in that. I believe in writing songs and I encourage it. But we were a great band. That’s all I want to say.

“Fly Away”
AL KOOPER: It’s a song I wrote about my first marriage. And I had a good arrangement for it, which my first marriage could have used. So it was easy for us to do because I just showed everybody what to play. It’s one of those ones where the arrangement was equal if not better than the song. It was a really good arrangement. And so there’s no holes in it. I think it really helped to make it work and we were all really playing together. Everybody’s playing exactly what they should play. There’s no bad parts in it. What was I influenced by? Probably more Dylan in the verses. I would say Dylan in the verses and the chorus was pretty original. I didn’t take that from anybody. Except in the arrangement there’s maybe a little “Down in the Boondocks.”

DANNY KALB: Unfortunately, the record company just wanted to make a few bucks. They were not interested in the artists, and on the back of Projections, one of the great albums of the ’60s, I don’t think our names are on it. That’s criminal.

STEVE KATZ: I have to say that our record company was really awful. There were things like that that were missed. From changing the name of my song, from not giving us enough studio time, not putting our names on it. There were just a lot of mistakes. There always were with Verve Folkways. It was awful.

AL KOOPER: We never saw the cover until it was in the store, and all stuff like that. We had zero control. We never heard the mixes ’till it was in the store.

DANNY KALB: I think that the way the Blues Project has been either forgotten or dissed is disgraceful. We were one of the most exciting bands in the period. We took big chances, spiritually and musically, and this is crap.

Photos related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (front)

THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS 3 (2).jpg

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)

 THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS 2 (2)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (A’ Side)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (B’ Side)

Photos related to the band :

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The Blues Project Matrix Concert Poster, 1966

Staples Concert Event Poster 1967 by Dave Withers

THE BLUES PROJECT POSTER 1 (2)

American band The Blues Project in concert at the Cafe Au Go Go, a nightclub in Greenwich Village, New York City, circa 1965. Singer Danny Kalb is in the centre. (Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

The Blues Project : News Photo

Psychedelic blues-rock band The Blues Project (l-r Danny Kalb, Steve Katz, Al Kooper, Roy Blumenfeld, Andy Kulberg) perform at the Cafe Au Go Go in June, 1967 in New York City, New York. (Photo by David Gahr/Getty Images)

Blues Project At The Cafe Au Go Go In NYC  : News Photo

The Blues Project, Monterey, 1967

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Image result for the blues project 1966

Links related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Napster”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Willie Said”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Article on the album on “The Music Court”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album’s Review/Article about the band on “Best Classic Bands”

 

Links related to the band :

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Facebook”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Google Play”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Deezer”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Tidal”

Steve Katz (The Blues Project) Interview on “Keep The Blues Alive”

Al Kooper (The Blues Project) Artist’s Interview on “Rock Of Ages”