Embryo – “No Place To Go” (1973)

Band : Embryo (Musical collective from Munich, Germany, founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann)

Country Of Origin : Germany

Members :

Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, vocals, marimba, drums, 1969-2018), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flute, violin, 1969-79, 1985-89), Lothar Meid (bass, 1971), Jimmy Jackson(organ, 1971), Ralph Fischer (bass, 1969-73), Dieter Miekautsch (piano, clavinet, 1972-75), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion, 1986-present), Wolfgang Paap (drums, 1971), Ingo Schmidt (saxophone, 1971), John Kelly (guitar, 1969-72), Charlie Mariano (soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, flute, bamboo flute, nagasuram, 1972-77), Roman Bunka (guitar, saz, vocals, percussion, bass, oud, 1972-80, 1988-96), Hans Fischer (flute, percussion, vocals, 1971), Jörg Evers (bass, 1971-72), Dave King (bass, 1972-73), Uwe Müllrich (bass, 1974-80), Maria Archer (vocals, percussion, 1975), Michael Wehmeyer(percussion, vocals, keyboards, 1983-84, 2002-present), Butze Fischer (drums, percussion, 1977-?), Friedemann Josch (flute, 1983-84), Julius Golombeck (guitar, percussion, oud, vocals, 1985-96), Gerald Luciano (bass, 1985), Lamidi Ayankunle (drums, vocals, 1986-?), Rabiu Ayandokun (drums, 1986-?), Marque Lowenthal (piano, 1988), Paolo Cardoso (bass, 1988), Paramashivam Pilai (vocals, tavil, 1988-?), Nie Xizhi (erhu, muyü, sheng, gaohu, 1995-present), Chris Karrer (oud, 1995-present), Lothar Stahl (drums, marimba), Jens Pollheide, Mik Quantius

Related Artists :

Amon Düül II, Checkpoint Charlie, Dissidenten, Mikrokosmos, Missus Beastly, Moira, Sadja

Track : “No Place To Go” (A1, written by Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard, Dieter Miekautsch, Roman Bunka)

Album : “We Keep On” (Band’s sixth studio album)

Label : BASF (20 21865-1)

Date/Year Of Release : 1973

Category/Music Genres : Jazz Rock, Krautrock, Progressive Rock, Germany, 1970s (Tracks)

Embryo – “No Place To Go”

Video on YouTube

The track is included on the album “We Keep On”, 1973 (A1, opening track)

“We Keep On” album (LP BASF Systems BC 21865 / CD Disconforme Records 1936 (1999) includes two lengthy bonus tracks “Ticket to India” and “Flute, Saz and Marimba” with different order of the tracks).

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Video on YouTube 

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Album cover photo (front)

Album photo (A’ Side)

Image result for embryo we keep on basf

Track-list

01. Abdul Malek (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 3:15
02. Don’t Come Tomorrow (Christian Burchard) – 3:48
03. Ehna, Ehna, Abu Lele (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 8:43
04. Hackbrett-Dance (Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 3:54
05. No Place To Go (Christian Burchard) – 12:27
06. Flute And Saz (Roman Bunka, Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 5:57
Total Time: 38:09
Bonuses:
07. Ticket To India (Christian Burchard) – 15:49
08. Flute, Saz And Marimba (Christian Burchard) – 8:35

Line-up 

– Roman Bunka / guitar, saxophone, vocals, percussion, bass (6)
– Christian Burchard / drums, vocals, percussion, marimba, vibes, hackbrett, Mellotron
– Charlie Mariano / alto & soprano saxes, flute, nagasuram, bamboo flute
– Dieter Miekautsch / acoustic & electric pianos, bass piano on the clavinet

Credits

Design – Holger Matthies

Lacquer Cut By – PF

Liner Notes – Rainer Blome

Liner Notes [Translation] – Mary McGlory

Producer – Embryo (3)

Producer, Photography By [Portraits] – Othmar Schreckeneder

Written-By – Mariano (tracks: A1 to B2, B4), Burchard, Miekautsch (tracks: A1, B1, B4), Bunka (tracks: A1 to B1, B3, B4)

Information about the band

Musical collective from Munich (Germany), founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann. Considered as one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s.
In 1981, Uve Müllrich and Michael Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.
Embryo have continued for over 40 years with Christian Burchard always in charge and an ever changing international cast of musicians including talents from North Africa, India, China, etc., as well as occasionally featuring top jazz names like Mal Waldron and Charlie Mariano and luminaries of the Krautrock scene (source : “Discogs”).

EMBRYO (not to be confused with Italian and Swedish death metal bands of the same name) are a musical collective from Munich who, lead by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard, boast the participation of some 400+ musicians since their beginnings in 1970. Over the years, the band went from classic space rock to jazz fusion, then Burchard soon started travelling the world and recording LPs with African bands and Middle Eastern musicians. They are still going strong and their 30 or so albums cover a wide spectrum of styles, but the constant remains a blend of Krautrock, fusion and ethnic music.

Of particular interest to progsters are four of their earlier albums: “Rache” (heavy, JETHRO TULL inspired), “Steig Aus” (for some warmer, jazzy prog), “Father, Son and Holy Ghost” (lots of ethnic influences) and “We Keep On” (a convincing blend of rock, ethnic and jazz). For fans who have already acquired the taste, “Zack Glück” (’80) is pleasantly quirky and more focussed than the rest of their repertoire; “Reise” (’79) is noteworthy for some interesting Indian fusion tracks; and “Opal” (’70), their very first, is considered their psychedelic masterpiece. For some samplers of more recent material, the album “Ni Hau” (’96), featuring music from China and Mongolia, and the double live cd “Istanboul-Casablanca – Tour 98” are particularly recommended.

If you’re into Krautrock and are a wee bit curious to see what a jazzy FAUST, AMON DÜÜL II or GURU GURU sounds like, you could start with any of the first four albums mentioned above (source : “Progarchives”).

One of the most original and innovative Krautrock bands, Embryo fused traditional ethnic music with their own jazzy space rock style. Over an existence spanning decades, during which Christian Burchard became the only consistent member, the group traveled the world, playing with hundreds of different musicians and releasing over 20 records.

Originally a jazzy space rock band, Embryo were formed in 1969 in Munich, Germany, by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, marimba), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone), Lothar Meid (bass), Jimmy Jackson (organ), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion), Wolfgang Paap (drums), Ingo Schmidt(saxophone), and John Kelly (guitar). However, the lineup was already different by the time sessions for their debut album began. The resulting record, Opal (1970), is considered Embryo’s masterpiece of their early, more psychedelic sound. By the time of Embryo’s Rache (1971), the group was already adding ethnic touches to its music.

In 1972, the same year they played at the Olympic Games in Munich, Embryo were invited by the Goethe Institute to tour Northern Africa and Portugal. In Morocco, the band was fascinated by the different tonal scales used by Moroccan musicians, profoundly shaping the group’s music to come. In 1973, the band was joined by saxophonist Charlie Mariano and guitarist Roman Bunka, who were both influential in moving Embryo toward their genre-blending mixture of space rock and ethnic sounds. We Keep On, released in 1973, was the most successful album in the group’s career.

However, after Surfin’ (1974) and Bad Heads & Bad Cats (1975), Burchard decided Embryo were moving in too commercial a direction and led them on an eight-month excursion to India, where they met local musicians. Shobha Gurtu, an Indian singer the bandmembers met during their travels, would later record an album with them, 1979’s Apo Calypso. Embryo also set up their own record label, Schneeball, with the rock band Checkpoint Charlie during this time, releasing such albums as 1979’s Embryo’s Reise and 1982’s La Blama Sparozzi – Zwischenzonen on the imprint. Embryo also took off on a two-year journey through the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, during which the band’s bus broke down in Tehran near the end of the Iranian Revolution in 1981; this musical expedition was captured by the documentary film Vagabunden-Karawane. After touring Asia, the Middle East, and Egypt during the early ’80s, Embryo released their first studio album in seven years, Zack Gluck, in 1984. The band then toured Africa and became involved with Nigeria’s Yoruba Dun Dun Ensemble.

However, after internal conflicts, Embryo split up. Burchard continued under the Embryo name with new musicians while a new group, Embryo’s Dissidenten, was formed. Embryo continued to release both new and archival recordings into the 21st century, including 2006’s Embryonnck, a collaboration with the No-Neck Blues Band. However, Burchard suffered a stroke in 2016, which effectively ended his career as a musician, and his daughter Marja took over leadership of the group. Christian Burcharddied in January 2018 at the age of 71 (source : “All Music”).

Embryo is a musical collective from Munich which has been active since 1969, although its story started in the mid-1950s in Hof where Christian Burchard and Dieter Serfas met for the first time at the age of 10. It was one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s and has also been described as “the most eclectic of the Krautrock bands.”

History

In 1969 the band was founded by multi instrumentalist Christian Burchard (drums, vibraphone, santur, keyboard) and Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flutes). To date more than 400 musicians have played with the collective, some, such as Charlie Mariano, Trilok Gurtu, Ramesh Shotham, Marty Cook, Yuri Parfenov, Allan Praskin, X.Nie, Nick McCarthy, Monty Waters and Mal Waldron, have played on multiple occasions. Longtime members are Edgar Hofmann (sax, violin), Dieter Serfas (drums), Roman Bunka (guitar, oud), Uve Müllrich (bass), Michael Wehmeyer (keyboard), Chris Karrer (guitar, oud, violin, sax), Lothar Stahl (marimba, drums), and Jens Polheide (bass, flute).

With Ton Steine Scherben, they were founders of the first German independent label Schneeball in 1976.

In 1979 the band started a nine-month tour to India by bus which is documented in the movie “Vagabunden Karawane”. Embryo developed from jazzy Krautrock to a world music band which is able to merge different styles and trends. Many of their albums originated during collective journeys on 4 continents. The band played many festivals around the globe: in India (Mumbai Jazz 1979), England (Reading 1973), Nigeria (Port Harcourt Jazz 1987), Japan (Wakayama 1991) to name a few. In July 2008, Embryo was awarded the German World Music Award RUTH 2008 at the TFF Rudolstadt Festival.

In 1981, Müllrich and Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.

On the road to Marokko in March 2016 Christian Burchard had a stroke. Since then Marja Burchard (drums, vibraphone, vocals, trombone, keyboard), daughter of Christian Burchard, who grew up with the band, is leading Embryo.

On January 17, 2018 Christian Burchard passed away in Munich. He was 71 years old (source : “Revolvy”/”Wikipedia”).

Discography 

Discography

1970: Opal (Ohr)

1971: Embryo’s Rache (United Artists)

1972: Father Son and Holy Ghosts (United Artists)

1972: Steig aus (Brain, a.k.a. This Is Embryo), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: Rocksession (Brain), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: We Keep On (BASF), featuring Charlie Mariano

1975: Surfin (Buk), featuring Charlie Mariano

1976: Bad Heads and Bad Cats (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Live (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Apo Calypso (April), featuring Trilok Gurtu and Shobha Gurtu on one track

1979: Embryo’s Reise (Schneeball/Indigo)

1980: Embryo / Karnataka College of Percussion / Charlie Mariano – Life (Schneeball)

1980: Anthology (Materiali Sonori, compilation reissued on CD as Every Day Is Okay in1992)

1982: La blama sparozzi / Zwischenzonen (Schneeball)

1984: Zack Glück (Materiali Sonori)

1985: Embryo & Yoruba Dun Dun Orchestra Feat. Muraina Oyelami (Schneeball)

1985: Africa (Materiali Sonori)

1989: Turn Peace (Schneeball), featuring Mal Waldron

1994: Ibn Battuta (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Marty Cook on one track

1996: Ni Hau (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Xizhi Nie

1998: Live in Berlin (Schneeball)

1999: Istanbul–Casablanca Tour 1998 (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Alan Praskin

1999: Invisible Documents (Disconforme)

2000: One Night in Barcelona (Recorded at the Joan Miró Foundation) (Disconforme),featuring Yuri Parfenov

2001: Live 2000, Vol. 1 (Schneeball)

2001: Live 2001, Vol. 2 (Schneeball)

2003: Bremen 1971 (Garden of Delights)

2003: Hallo Mik (Schneeball/Indigo, live recordings)

2006: Embryonnck with the No-Neck Blues Band(Schneeball/Staubgold/Sound@One)

2006: News (Ultimate)

2007: Live im Wendland (Schneeball), anti-nuclear solidarity concert 2005 in Gorleben

2007: For Eva , 1967 recording featuring Mal Waldron

2008: Freedom in Music , featuring X. Nie

2008: Live at Burg Herzberg Festival 2007 (Trip in Time)

2008: Wiesbaden 1972 (Garden of Delights)

2010: Embryo 40 (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

2011: Memory Lane, Vols. 1-3 (Download only), featuring Mal Waldron

2016: It Do (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

External links 

Embryo Band’s Homepage

Embryo Band’s Page on Facebook

Embryo Band’s Page on Spotify

Embryo Band’s Page on Last Fm

Charlie Mariano Tribute Page

Embryo Album Reviews on Gnosis2000.Net

Embryo Band’s Documentary on IMDb

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on Rock & Roll Archives

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on 7Digital

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album on Google Play

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Albun on Apple Music

 

 

 

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Hölderlin – “Waren Wir”

Hölderlin – “Waren Wir” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Band :

Hölderlin (Wuppertal, Düsseldorf, Germany)

Image result for holderlin 1972

Hoelderlin were a German progressive rock band that was formed in 1970 as Hölderlin by brothers Joachim and Christian von Grumbkow with Nanny de Ruig, whom Christian was married to. They were influenced by rock, jazz, and folk music.

Track :

“Waren Wir” A1 track (written by Christian von Grumbkow), (opening track) included on the album “Hölderlins Traum”

Album :

Hölderlins Traum” released on Pilz (20 21314-5) in 1972

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (front)

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Video on YouTube

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Soundcloud

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

Nanny de Ruig – female vocals
Christian von Grumbkow – guitar
Joachim von Grumbkow – cello, acoustic guitar, flute, piano, organ, mellotron
Peter Käseberg – bass, acoustic guitar, vocals
Christoph Noppeney – violin, flute, piano
Michael Bruchmann – drums, percussion
Peter Bursch – sitar (03)
Mike Hellbach – tablas (03)

All tracks written by Christian von Grumbkow .

Credits :

Artwork – Helmut Friz

Engineer [Sound] – Dieter Dierks

Photography – Victor

Producer – Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser

Walter Westrupp – recorder (05)

Recorded January 1972 at Tonstudio Dierks in Stommeln.

Released in a laminated gatefold cover.

Track-list :

01. Waren wir – 4:50
02. “Peter” – 2:55
03. Strohhalm – 2:04
04. Reqiem für einen Wicht – 6:36
05. Erwachen – 4:04
06. Wetterbericht – 6:37
07. Traum – 7:23

HOLDERLIN HOLDERLINS TRAUM 2 (2)

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Discogs”

From Wuppertal, circa 20 miles east of Düsseldorf, Germany, Hölderlin evolved out of a 1960’s folk group playing Fairport Convention and Pentangle songs. They took their name from the 19th Century writer Friedrich Hölderlin.
Originally, they were a family band, the core was the brothers Christian and Jochen von Grumbkow, with Christian’s wife Nanny as lead singer, with a trippy cosmic styled progressive folk, full of rich textures, psychedelic, medieval and classical touches.

“Wikipedia”

The group started out as a folk group, but after the release of their first album in 1972 and the departure of Nanny in 1973, the group began to change musical direction, incorporating jazz and rock. They changed their name to Hoelderlin in 1973 and took legal action against Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser, the head and founder of the label Pilz, which eventually led to the record label going out of business. In 1975 they got a new record contract with the label Spiegelei and released their second album the same year. After the release of three more albums, almost all of the founding members left the group, leaving Joachim to be the only remaining founding member. This led to both a significant change in lineup and another significant change in musical direction. The group was introduced to Dave Hutchins, who was an engineer for the Genesis album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and subsequently decided to develop an anglo-american commercial sound that later resulted in two more albums before their split in 1980. The album Fata Morgana was then put together and released by Spiegelei the following year. The group reunited in 2005 with only Hans Bäär and Michael Bruchmann as former members. However, Christoph and Nanny made special guest appearances for a few of their subsequent performances. Upon the release of their eighth album, the group then split up again in 2009.

Personnel :

Michael Bruchmann – drums (1971-1978, 2005-2009)

Hans Bäär – bass, guitars, vocals (1976-1981, 2005-2009)

Ann-Yi Eötvös – vocals (2005-2009)

Andreas Hirschmann – keyboards, vocals (2005-2009)

Joachim von Grumbkow – keyboards, vocals (1970-1981) (died 1990)

Christian von Grumbkow – guitar (1970-1977), lyrics (1970-1978)

Christoph Noppeney – violin (1971-1977), guitar, vocals (1975-1978)

Tommy L’Ohr – guitar, vocals (1977-1981)

Peter Käseberg – bass, vocals (1970-1975)

Eduard Schicke – drums (1978-1981)

Nanny de Ruig (1970-1972)

Pablo Weeber – guitar, vocals (1976-1977)

Discography :

Hölderlins Traum (Pilz, 1972)

Hoelderlin (Spiegelei, 1975)

Clown & Clouds (1976)

Rare Birds (1977)

Traumstadt (Live Album, 1978)

New Faces (1979)

Fata Morgana (1981)

8 (2007)

“ProgArchives”

Founded in Wuppertal, Germany in 1970 – Disbanded in 1980 – Reformed from 2005-2009

This, in my opinion, underrated German progressive rock band has its roots in ’63 when the brothers Joachim and Christian Grumbkow founded the rock-band The BEATKIDS and played covers from The BEATLES, The ROLLING STONES and The SHADOWS. In november ’70 the brothers GRUMBKOW presented the name HÖLDERLIN (derived from a German romantic poet) after they had played with a sery of musicians mainly folk-rock covers (especially TRAFFIC), all layered with long instrumental improvisations. Then HÖLDERLIN got an invitation from a record company, this after only three months of their existence! The debut-album “Hölderlin’s Traum” was released in ’72 with a nine-piece line up, including female vocals and instruments like the Mellotron, Grand piano, violin, cello, sitar, tablas and flute. Their sound is a progressive blend of rock, jazz and folk. It sold 5000 copies and the LP is still a collector’s item. But then the troubles began with their producer Rolf-Ulrich Kaiser (TANGERINE DREAM, KLAUS SCHULZE and WALLENSTEIN). He tried to force the band into a more cosmic approach (‘LSD’ inspired complained the band) and was not amused with the “more political oriented lyrics” as he analyzed.

It took almost three years with many juridical conflicts to get rid off the contract but eventually HÖLDERLIN won their case. Under the new name HOELDERLIN (in German the pronunciation of “oe” is the same as the “ö” and much easier to write or type) the second eponymous LP was released in 75. The band called their music ‘romantic rock’, it sounded more jazzy and it contained echoes from KING CRIMSON and GENESIS. HOELDERLIN toured through Scandinavia, Holland, Germany and Switzerland, got good reviews and radio – and tv-airplay. In ’76 HOELDERLIN released the album entitled “Clowns and Clouds”. The music consists of more complex rock with many theatrical and surrealistic elements. In ’77 Christian had a mental breakdown, he could no longer combine the too busy work with the band and his family life (the upbringing of two children). He left and Spanish guitar player Pablo Weeber joined HOELDERLIN. In ’77 they released the album “Rare Birds”, a year later followed by the 2-LP “Hoelderlin Live Traumstadt”. Soon after the unstable personality of Pablo led to his dismiss. “Traumstadt” got very good reviews, it even reached the German charts. Further releases were “New Faces” (’79) and “Fata Morgana” (’81), including new drummer Eduard Schicke, know from the progrock trio SCHICKE, FUHRS, FRÖHLING. These albums have a more accessible melodic rock approach.

The double-album “Hoelderlin Live Traumstadt” is their finest work and showcases the band at their pinnacle. It’s still considered as one of the milestones in the German rock history and has some similarities with other German progrock band GROBSCHNITT concerning the long solos, visual effects, costumes and humor. The music was recorded in the Wuppertaler Opernhaus in October ’77, the 2-LP was released in ’78. The band was hit by multiple changes in the line-up, on “Traumstadt” the musicians were Joachim Grumbkow (keyboards and vocals on “Streaming”), Pablo Weeber (all guitars), Michael Bruchmann (drums), Cristoph ‘Nops’ Noppeney (lead vocals and violin) and Hans Bäär (bass). All the nine melodic tracks have their own climate and features fluid accelerations, nice interludes, pleasant keyboards (string-ensemble, electric piano, organ and clavinet) and great interplay between electric guitar and violin. But the focus is on the solo work: fiery (“Sun Rays”), biting (“Soft Landing”) and howling (“Die Stadt”) on the electric guitar and exciting (“Streaming”) and spectacular (“Die Stadt”) on the violin. Many solos are supported by the wonderful and distinctive sound of the string-ensemble, a compelling combination! Recommended, especially to the fans of the violin play of Jean Luc PONTY and Eddie JOBSON.

Photos related to the album/track :

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (front)

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album cover photo (back)

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum” Album  photo (A/B’ Sides)

Photos related to the band :

holderlin band

holderlin band

holderlin band

Links related to the album/track :

Hölderlin – “Waren Wir” Track Video on “YouTube”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Soundcloud”

Hölderlin – Hölderlins Traum Full Album Audio Playlist on “Shazam”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album on “Google Play”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album on “Apple Music”

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Download Link on “Old Rock News” Blog

Hölderlin – “Hölderlins Traum” Full Album Download Link on “Free Spiritual Be-In” Blog

Links related to the band :

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “ProgArchives”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Discogs”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Musikzirkus”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Spotify”

Hölderlin Article about the band on “Rheinlaender”

Hölderlin Band’s Page on “Google Play”

 

 

 

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock/Space Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks) Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future”

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock/Space Rock Germany 1970s (Tracks)

Twenty Sixty Six And Then (Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg , Germany)

Krautrock/Progressive Rock Band

“Reflections On The Future” (written by Veit Marvos/Geff Harrison) B1 track included on the album “Reflections On The Future”

Released on United Artists Records (UAS 29 314 I) in 1972

Line-up/Credits :

Geff Harrison / lead vocals
Gerhard Mrozeck / acoustic & electric guitars
Steve Robinson / keyboards
Veit Marvos / keyboards
Dieter Bauer / bass
Konstatin Bommarius / drums

With:

Wolfgang Schönbrot / flute
Curt Cress / drums

Arranged By – Twenty Sixty Six And Then

Bass Guitar – Dieter Bauer

Design [Cover-Design] – Günter Karl

Drums – Konstantin Bommarius

Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals – Gagey Mrozeck

Engineer – Dieter Dierks

Lead Vocals – Geff Harrison

Lyrics By – Harrison

Organ, Electric Piano [E-piano], Piano, Mellotron, Percussion, Vocals – Veit Marvos

Organ, Electric Piano [E-piano], Vibraphone [Vibes], Synthesizer, Mellotron, Vocals  Steve Robinson

Photography By – Gerhard Vormwal

Producer [Produced By (Inside Cover)] – Madaus Sound

Producer [Produced By (On Record Labels)] – Eckhard Madaus

Track-List :

1.  At My Home (Gerhard Mrozeck, Steve Robinson, Geff Harrison) – 05:02
2.  Autumn (Steve Robinson, Geff Harrison) – 09:05
3.  Butterking (Steve Robinson, Geff Harrison) – 07:20
4.  Reflections On The Future (Veit Marvos, Geff Harrison) – 15:47
5.  How Would You Feel (Veit Marvos, Geff Harrison) – 03:22

TWENTY SIXTY SIX AND THEN are: Geff Harrison on lead vocals, Gagey Mrozeck on guitars, Dieter Bauer on bass, Konstatin Bommarius on drums and Steve Robinson with Veit Marvos both sharing duties on organ, electric piano, vibes, synthesizer, mellotron and vocals (the name ‘2066 & THEN’ comes from adding an extra thousand to the number 1066, year of the historical battle of Hastings). Their heavy progressive style has been compared to that of DEEP PURPLE, VANILLA FUDGE and IRON BUTTERFLY. After releasing their first album, individual members got involved in different projects that never really stood the test of time, so ‘Reflections on the Future’ is their only legacy, and a fine one at that.

Their dramatic organ-drenched, complex music sometimes dons symphonic elements, but the band isn’t afraid to dive into some heavy guitar/organ jamming either, featuring elements of jazz, some high-octane rhythmic parts and quick changes, mixed with weird psychedelic electronic effects – the hoarse vocals, however, perhaps better suited to conventional hard rock, may take some getting used to.

Their record company (Second Battle) re-released the album in 1991 under the name ‘Reflections on the Past’. Considered a collectors item, it also contains unreleased masters and some bonus practice sessions from an early rehearsal session in 1991. In 1994, the cd ‘Reflections!’ came out, compiling tracks from both, plus some which had been considered for a second album that never materialized. A combination of poor sales and a ruined German economy at the time sadly forced the premature death of this fine German band, only months after the release of their first album.

Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Album cover photo (front)

TWENTY SIXTY SIX AND THEN REFLECTIONS ON THE FUTURE 1 (2)

Twenty Sixty Six And Then 

TWENTY SIXTY SIX AND THEN PHOTO 2

 Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Video file link on YouTube

Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Twenty Sixty Six And Then Band’s Page on Discogs

Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Full Album Download Link on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Twenty Sixty Six And Then Band’s Page on Apple Music

Twenty Sixty Six And Then Band’s Page on Google Music Store

Twenty Sixty Six And Then Band’s Page on Deezer

Twenty Sixty Six And Then Band’s Page on Napster

Twenty Sixty Six And Then – “Reflections On The Future” Full Album Download Link on Back In Purple 70 Blog

Folk/Krautrock/Progressive Rock/Space Rock Germany 1970s Personal Playlist on Spotify