Canterbury Scene, Folk, Progressive, Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Time Wasters – “Seventh Wave”

Time Wasters – “Seventh Wave” Video on YouTube

Category/Music  Genres :

Canterbury Scene/Folk/Progressive/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) 

 Band :

Time Wasters (Ingestre, Staffordshire, U.K.)

 Time Wasters Band’s Photo

Members :
Phil Jones (alto saxophone), Fred Skidmore (drums, electric piano), Dave Beale (vocals, lead guitar, rhythm guitar), Pete Ralley (bass guitar), Pauline Taylor (vocals, percussion), Ken Barnsley (double bass), Chris Burton (flute), Tim Pye (vocals, lead guitar, slide guitar, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar), Greg Holt (vocals, drums, congas, synthesizer), Chris Stevens (vocals, lead guitar, acoustic guitar, piano, harmonica)

Related Artists :

Alvin Stardust 

Track :

“Seventh Wave” (written by Time Wasters) B5 track included on the album “Time Wasters” (instrumental)

Album :

“TIme Wasters” released on Personal Records (STICKY 1) in 1978, recorded at Ingester Hall.

Private press. Limited to 200 copies.

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album cover photo (front)

THE TIME WASTERS BAND 2 (2)

Line-up/Credits :

Alto Saxophone – Phil Jones (36)

Backing Vocals, Drums, Congas, Synthesizer – Greg Holt

Backing Vocals, Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar – Dave Beale

Backing Vocals, Percussion – Pauline Taylor

Bass Guitar – Pete Ralley

Double Bass – Ken Barnsley

Drums, Electric Piano – Fred Skimore

Flute – Chris Burton

Lead Vocals, Backing Vocals, Guitar – Tim Pye

Lead Vocals, Backing Vocals, Guitar, Piano, Harmonica – Chris Stevens (15)

TIME WASTERS LINE UP

Track-List :

01.Smile 3:46
02.Won’t Find Another 3:43
03.Maybe Next Time 3:17
04.Won’t Get To Heaven 2:48
05.Ballons 2:04
06.The Same Again 3:27
07.Not Fit For Your Love 2:59
08.The Cost You Have Paid 3:57
09.Keep Me Hanging On 2:32
10.Last Words 3:55
11.Seventh Wave 2:59
12.Change My Mind 2:02

THE TIME WASTERS TRACK LIST 1 (2)

Information about the album/band/track :

“Golden Pavilion Records”

Canterbury style UK fragile folk with psych leanings. UK album recorded by a group of students at the Ingestre Hall Residential Arts Centre. The name of the band was actually a joke based on newspaper advertisements for musicians to join bands, which would sometimes end with “No time wasters”! So Greg Holt, the band’s founder, called them “Time Wasters Only” and the generic name for any of the musicians in the group became “Time Wasters”. Musically ranging from fragile and melodic folk with Bluesy moments and even soul-jazz vibes, encompased in a psych-folk-rock with Canterbury signature. A lost album in the brink of a new era, echoing sounds of British progressive and psych-folk. Fully licensed reissue limited to 500 copies only.

“Popsike”

An Acid-Folk-Psych-Prog lost masterpiece by the obscure TIME WASTERS.

Reecorded some 40 years ago, truely stunning UK private press by 6 long haired students at the Ingestre Hall Residential Arts Centre. Canterbury style UK fragile folk with prog/psych leanings and some great late 60s Pink Floyd-ish electric guitar leads. Great vox and some enchanted wind playing, encompassed in a psych-folk-rock signature. 12 blistering original tracks, recorded at Ingester Hall, originally released in 1978 on the Sticky label, only 200 copies max pressed !

Comes in fully laminated sleeve with lyric insert, blue label.

Photos about the album/band/track :

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album cover photo (front)

THE TIME WASTERS BAND 2 (2)

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album cover photo (back)

Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Photo

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Photo

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Artwork

(Reissue Edition, Golden Pavilion Records, GP1013LP, 2011)

 Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Artwork

(Reissue Edition, Golden Pavilion Records, GP1013LP, 2011)

THE TIME WASTERS BAND 3 (2)

Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Artwork

(Reissue Edition, Golden Pavilion Records, GP1013LP, 2011)

THE TIME WASTERS BAND 4 (2)

Time Wasters – “Time Wasters” Album Photo

(Reissue Edition, Golden Pavilion Records, GP1013LP, 2011)

Time Wasters Band’s Photo

HTE TIME WASTERS BAND 1 (2).jpg

 Time Wasters Band’s Photo

TIME WASTERS BAND 1

 

 Time Wasters Band’s Photo

Time Wasters Band’s Photo

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Image result for composer

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Greg Holt Artist’s Photo

Photo of Ingestre Hall

(The Time Wasters’ self-titled album was recorded at Ingestre Hall.

Ingestre Hall is a Grade II 17th-century Jacobean mansion situated at Ingestre, near Stafford, Staffordshire, England. Formerly the seat of the Earls Talbot and then the Earls of Shrewsbury, the hall is now owned by Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council and is in use as a Residential Arts and Conference Centre). 

Image result for Ingestre Hall Residential Arts Centre

Links about the album/band/track :

Time Wasters – “Seventh Wave” Video file link on YouTube

Time Wasters Band’s Page on Discogs

Time Wasters Band’s Interview on Somewhere There Is Music Website

Time Wasters Band’s Page on Golden Pavilion Records

Greg Holt (Time Wasters) Artist’s Interview on It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine Blog

Time Wasters Bands’ Page on Rate Your Music

Time Wasters -“Time Wasters” on Popsike

 

Ambient/Canterbury Scene, Electronic Music, Progressive Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Space Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff”

Steve Hillage Photo

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Ambient/Canterbury Scene/Electronic Music/Progressive/Psychedelic/Space Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks)

Artist :

Steve Hillage (London, U.K.)

Image result for steve hillage

Artist’s full name : Stephen Simpson Hillage

Also known as :

Simeon Sasparella, Steve Hillfish, The Steve Hillage Band

Member of :

Arzachel, Gong, Khan, Mirror System, Paragong, System 7

Track :

“The Glorious Om Riff” (written by Compagnie d’ Opera Invisible de Thibet, aka Gong)  B6 (closing track) included on the album “Green” 

“The Glorious OM Riff” is a remake of the song “Master Builder” from the Gong album You (1974), which Hillage had a hand in composing with the other members of Gong. The song is “a cacophonous blast, with masses of ear-splitting solos,” and it has been noted that “the seeds of [Hillage’s] future direction were sown here.

Album :

“Green” released on Virgin Records ( V 2098) in April 1978

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Green vinyl, packaged with embossed cover, printed insert sheet and poster included.

Printed in England by ROBOR LIMITED.

“A Celebration Of Time-Space Travel Through Nature”

Basic tracks recorded December 1977 at Ridge Farm, Dorking, Surrey.
Overdubs recorded January 1978 at Matrix Studio, London.
Overdubs and mixing February 1978 at Brittania Row Studio, London.

℗ 1978 Virgin Records Ltd.

Line-up/Credits :

Steve Hillage – Guitar, Synthesizer [Moog, Guitar], Vocals, Producer, Arranged By

With:

Miquette Giraudy / ARP & EMS synthesizers, vocoder, vocals

Curtis Robertson / bass

Joe Blocker / drums, percussion

Andy Anderson / drums (2,11,13)

Nick Mason / drums (7), co-producer

Dave Stewart / guitars (11,13)

Paul Francis / bass (11,13)

Christian Boule / guitars (12)

Phil Hodge / keyboards (12)

Basil Brooks / synthesizer (12)

Colin Bass / bass (12)

Clive Bunker / drums(12)

ArtWork: John Michell

Engineer – John Wood

Engineer [Assistant] – Andy Llewelyn, Malcolm Heeley

Producer – Nick Mason

Written-By – Bynum (tracks: B2), C.O.I.T. (tracks: B6), Robertson (tracks: B1, B2), Blocker (tracks: B2), Giraudy (tracks: A1 to B5), Hillage

Recorded At – Ridge Farm Studios

Overdubbed At – Matrix Studios

Overdubbed At – Britannia Row Studios

Mixed At – Britannia Row Studios

Printed By – Robor Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Virgin Records Ltd.

Copyright (c) – Virgin Music (Publishers) Ltd.

Track-List :

1. Sea-nature (6:43)
2. Ether Ships (5:02)
3. Musick Of The Trees (4:53)
4. Palm Trees (Love Guitar) (5:19)
5. Unidentified (Flying Being) (4:30)
6. U.F.O. Over Paris (3:11)
7. Leylines To Glassdom (4:06)
8. Crystal City (3:36)
9. Activation Meditation (1:03)
10. The Glorious Om Riff (7:46)

Total Time: 46:13

Bonus Tracks on 2007 Virgin Remaster:
11. Unidentified (Flying Being) (Live) (4:52)
12. Not Fade Away (Glid Forever) (Live)  (7:25)
13. Octave Doctors (Live *) (3:38)
14. Meditation Of The Snake (Alternative Mix) (3:16)

* Recorded at Glastonbury 1979
$ Recorded at The Rainbow Theatre 1977

Information about the album/artist/track :

Green is the fourth studio album by British progressive rock musician Steve Hillage. Written in spring 1977 at the same time as his previous album, the funk-inflicted Motivation Radio (1977), Green was originally going to be released as The Green Album as a companion to The Red Album (the originally intended name for Motivation Radio). However, this plan was dropped and after a US tour in late 1977, Green was recorded alone, primarily in Dorking, Surrey, and in London.

Produced and engineered by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason, Green features science fiction themes and explores electronic music, especially of a dance music bent, continuing the dance themes of Motivation Radio. Most of the guitar and some of the keyboard parts on Green were played by Hillage with a Roland GR 500–an early guitar synthesizer. Hillage enjoyed “the hybrid sounds” he achieved on the album with the instrument, but would retire the instrument as it was too problematic to use.

The album was released in 1978 by Virgin Records, originally as a limited edition translucent green vinyl before the standard version replaced it shortly afterwards. The album cover features a distinctive “pyramid fish” design by English writer John Michell. Green peaked at number 30 on the UK Albums Chart and was a critical success. Hillage pursued a more electronic direction after its release. Green was remastered for CD release in both 1990 and 2007.

On Steve Hillage’s 1978 release Green, the underground prog rock fan favorite issues more of his trademark thinking-man’s music. Fans of mid- to late-’70s Pink Floyd will want to check this album out, since it possesses many of the same musical qualities, due to the fact that it was produced by Floyd drummer Nick Mason, along with Hillage. Although not as consistent as some of his other albums, it certainly has its moments. Hillage’s recurring sci-fi influence is still felt in his music, especially on such tracks as “Sea Nature,” “UFO Over Paris,” and “Unidentified (Flying Being).” Hillage uses the same band that appeared on his Motivation Radio album, which helps make Hillage’s twisted songs even better (like his other albums, the musicianship is top-notch). Besides comparisons to Floyd, the album’s music is also similar to David Bowie‘s late-’70s experimental electronic phase (check out the track “Crystal City,” with vocals almost identical to Bowie). Hillage fans will definitely not be disappointed with Green.

Photos related to the album/artist/track :

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo 

STEVE HILLAGE GREEN 1 (2)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album cover photo (front)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album cover photo (back)

STEVE HILLAGE GREEN 2 (2).jpg

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (A’ Side)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (B’ Side)

 

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (A’ Side)

Steve Hillage – “Green” Album photo (B’ Side)

Steve Hillage -“Green” Album Artwork

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Steve Hillage -“Green” Album Artwork

Steve Hillage - Green (1978) Issue 1990 and Extended Remastered reissue 2007

Steve Hillage Photo

STEVE HILLAGE 2 (2).jpg

Links related to the album/artist/track :

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Video file link on YouTube

Steve Hillage – “The Glorious Om Riff” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Spotify

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Google Play

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page/Full Albums/Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Steve Hillage – “Green” Full Album Download Link on Opium Hum Blog

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Discogs

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Rate Your Music

Steve Hillage Artist’s Homepage

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Progarchives

Steve Hillage Band/Gong Band’s Homepage

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Twitter

Steve Hillage Artist’s Interview on Rocktologist Website

Steve Hillage Artist’s Interview on Inner Views Website

Steve Hillage Band Band’s Page on Bandcamp

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on IMDb

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Apple Music

Steve Hillage Artist’s related shows on Mixcloud

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Setlist Fm

\Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on Instagram

Steve Hillage Artist’s Page on eBay

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Alternative/Experimental/New Wave/Post Punk Rock U.K. 1970s Gang Of Four – “Damaged Goods”

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Alternative/Experimental/New Wave/Post Punk Rock U.K. 1970s

Gang Of Four (Leeds, U.K.)

Related Artists :

King Butcher

Also known as :

Gang of 4
7-inch E.P.  (A’ Side)

“Damaged Goods”(written by Gang Of Four) A’ Side single (debut single) released on Fast Product Records (FAST 5) on 13th October 1978. It is also included on the band’s debut album “Entertainment!” released on EMI Records (EMC 3313) on 25th September 1979 (A4 track on the album).

Damaged Goods” is the debut single by Gang of Four. It was released on 13 October 1978 through independent record label Fast Product. Produced by Fast Product owner Bob Last under the alias Fast Product, the single received critical acclaim, prompting the band to sign to EMI Records. The title track and “Love Like Anthrax” were re-recorded for Gang of Four’s debut album Entertainment! in 1979 and the whole EP was included in the Fast Product compilation Mutant Pop in 1980.

Track List (Single “Damaged Goods”) :

All tracks written by Gang of Four.

No. Title Length
1. “Damaged Goods” 3:34
2. “Armalite Rifle” 3:18
3. “Love Like Anthrax” 3:03
Total length: 9:55

Line-up/Credits :

Gang of Four

Andy Gill — guitar, vocals

Jon King — lead vocals

Hugo Burnham – drums

Dave Allen — bass guitar

John Brierley – engineering

Bob Last (credited as Fast Product) – production

Gang of Four – production

All songs written by Dave Allen, Hugo Burnham, Andy Gill, and Jon King.

Track-List (full album “Entertainment!”) :

Side one :

  1. “Ether” – 3:52
  2. “Natural’s Not in It” – 3:09
  3. “Not Great Men” – 3:08
  4. “Damaged Goods” – 3:29
  5. “Return the Gift” – 3:08
  6. “Guns Before Butter” – 3:49

Side two :

  1. “I Found That Essence Rare” – 3:09
  2. “Glass” – 2:32
  3. “Contract” – 2:42
  4. “At Home He’s a Tourist” – 3:33
  5. “5.45” – 3:48
  6. “Anthrax” – 4:23

1995 bonus tracks :

EMI Records CD issue (mastered by Andy Gill & John King) includes the following singles:

  1. “Outside the Trains Don’t Run on Time” – 3:27
  2. “He’d Send in the Army” – 3:40
  3. “It’s Her Factory” – 3:08

Infinite Zero Archive/American Recordings CD issue includes the Yellow EP:

  1. “Armalite Rifle” – 2:48

2005 bonus tracks :

In addition to the Yellow EP, the Rhino release adds four previously unissued tracks:

  1. “Guns Before Butter (alternate version)” – 4:25
  2. “Contract (alternate version)” – 2:48
  3. “Blood Free” (live at The Electric Ballroom, London) – 3:17
  4. “Sweet Jane” (live at the American Indian Center) (Lou Reed) – 3:20

Line-up/Credits :

Gang of Four :

Hugo Burnham – drums, vocals

Dave Allen – bass guitar, vocals

Andy Gill – guitar, vocals, art design

Jon King – vocals, melodica, art design

Crew [Road] – Jol Burnham, Phil Allen (3)

Design, Producer – Jon King

Lacquer Cut By – RAYS

Layout – Cream (7)

Producer – Rik Walton

Producer, Engineer – Rick Walton

Producer, Management – Rob Warr

Technician [Tape Operator] – Davy Phee, Edwin Cross

Written-By, Arranged By, Producer – Gang Of Four

First pressing issued with an image printed on the B-side label and text on the A-side one.
Lyrics, credits and band notes on a stiff inner sleeve with die-cut rounded corners.
Later reissued with text on both labels and different runout etchings.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Gang Of Four

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Fast Product

Recorded At – The Workhouse Studios

Manufactured By – EMI Records

Published By – EMI Music Ltd.

Lyrics :
The change will do you good
I always knew it would
Sometimes I’m thinking that I love you
But I know it’s only lust
Your kiss so sweet
Your sweat so sour
Your kiss so sweet
Your sweat so sour
Sometimes I’m thinking that I love you
But I know it’s only lust
The sins of the flesh
Are simply sins of lust
Sweats running down your back
Sweats running down your neck
Heated couplings in the sun
(Or is that untrue?)
Colder couplings in the night
(Never saw your body)
Your kiss so sweet
Your sweat so sour
Sometimes I’m thinking that I love you
But I know its only lust
The change will do you good
I always knew it would
You know the change will do you good
You know the change will do you good
Damaged goods, send them back
I can’t work, I can’t achieve, send me back
Open the till, give me the change
You said, would do me good
Refund the cost
You said you’re cheap but you’re too much
Your kiss so sweet
Your sweat so sour
Sometimes I’m thinking that I love you
But I know it’s only lust
The change will do you good
I always knew it would
You know the change will do you good
You know the change will do you good
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
I’m kissing you goodbye
(Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye)
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye, goodbye
Goodbye, goodbye, goodbye
Songwriters: David Allen / Hugo Burnham / Andrew Gill / Jonathan King
English post punk band Gang of Four enjoyed little commercial success but their blend of punk with funk has been influential on a number of 21st century bands including Bloc Party and Franz Ferdinand. This song was the lead track on their debut EP, which was an indie hit. They later included it on their first album, Entertainment! on the EMI record label. Gang Of Four singer Jon King told Clash Magazine: “The song was on our debut Fast Product EP, which became a big indie hit. But we weren’t paid a cent for our work, majorly ripped off, so we re-recorded it for Entertainment!. I regret not punching out the bloke who ran the label. (Note to self: do this before you die) We’re often asked “why did you sign to a major label if you’re so alternative?” One answer: EMI at least paid us for the records it sold.”
Thirty years after the release of Entertainment!, King recalled the song to Clash Magazine: “Saturday afternoons, we wandered, walleyed, through the sun-bright aisles of Morrison’s supermarket in Leeds, looking for a 2-4-1 bargains and generic baked beans. The hopeless in-store slogan at the point of sale was: “The change will do you good” meaning “change” as in money and “change” as in switch store. Someone got paid for this rubbish!. I found this good starter for words about a doomed relationship where legover had become, maybe, too much of a good thing. Or at any rate, a thing. Andy (Gill, guitarist) punctuates the main lyric with a call and response thing and sings the iconic mid section “Damaged goods, send them back” words. The music’s cute: alternate the guitar and bass duh duh dink! Duh duh dink! & build the song around this R&B clatter among dynamic drop outs where everyone got to feature. We didn’t want a pop structure. We’d had it with dominant, subdominant, tonic chord progressions. So we had none, instead.”
In 2003, Entertainment! was ranked number 490 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Entertainment! is the debut album by English post-punk band Gang of Four, released in September 1979. This album was released on EMI in the UK and on Warner Bros. in the US. Stylistically, the album draws on punk but also incorporates the influence of funk, dance music, reggae and dub. Its lyrics and artwork reflected the band’s left-wing political concerns. It would be an influential release in the burgeoning post-punk movement.

The album was ranked at No. 5 among the top “Albums of the Year” for 1979 by NME. In 2003, the album was ranked number 490 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. In March 2005, Q magazine placed the track “At Home He’s a Tourist” at number 52 in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks. As of 2009, Entertainment! has sold more than 100,000 copies in the UK. In 2004, Pitchfork listed Entertainment! as eighth best album of the 1970s.

One of the most influential and groundbreaking bands to rise from the British punk scene in the late ’70s, Gang of Four took the freedoms and possibilities presented by punk and brought them to wild and unexpected places, both musically and philosophically. Gang of Four‘s music fused tough funk rhythms, jagged shards of metallic guitar, and lyrics that filtered Marxist theory through the realities of daily life into a sound that bore little resemblance to any other group when they released their debut album, Entertainment!, in 1979. The LP received triumphant reviews from critics and was a surprise hit in the U.K., while their third album, 1982’s Songs of the Free, gave them a commercial breakthrough in the United States as the single “I Love a Man in a Uniform” gained airplay on college radio and open-minded R&B stations. Gang of Four folded after 1983’s Hard, but founders Andy Gill and Jon King periodically re-formed the band in the ’80s, ’90s, and 2000s for touring and recording projects that kept their singular sound alive. Gang of Four‘s music was a key influence on a diverse variety of musicians, including FugaziFranz Ferdinand, and Nirvana, while the ferocious but intelligent tone of their lyrics and their rejection of empty sloganeering would inform the outlook of any number of thoughtful post-punk groups.

Gang of Four guitarist Andy Gill and vocalist Jon King first met as teenagers while they were attending Sevenoaks School in Greater London; they were both keen on art studies and played music with friends, favoring reggae. In 1977, Gill and King were students at Leeds University, where a lively music scene had sprung up around groups like the Mekons and Delta 5. Eager to form a new band, they recruited fellow Leeds student Hugo Burnham to play drums, and found bassist Dave Allen through an ad they placed, describing themselves as a “fast R&B band.” From the beginning, the band’s sound was unusual, with Burnham and Allen playing a bruising variation on James Brown and ParliamentFunkadelicgrooves and Gill chopping out staccato guitar patterns that incorporated clouds of noise and stark dynamics, while King‘s vocals dealt with the politics of daily lives, less concerned with slogans than with a clever but streetwise analysis of how systems and economics affected the lives of nearly everyone. Named after a faction of the Chinese Communist Party who were cited for their abuse of power during the Cultural Revolution, Gang of Four made their debut in 1977, and in June 1978 they recorded their first single, a three-song 7″ released by the independent Fast Product label featuring the songs “Damaged Goods,” “Love Like Anthrax,” and “Armalite Rifle.” The single received enthusiastic reviews when it was released late in the year, and major labels came calling, with EMI signing the band for the U.K. and Europe while Warner Bros. would handle their releases in North America.

EMI released Gang of Four‘s second single, “At Home He’s a Tourist” b/w “It’s Her Factory,” in May 1979, and while the BBC banned it from airplay due to a lyrical reference to condoms (the band’s refusal to change the lyrics also kept them off Top of the Pops), it still charted in the U.K. Top 60, and when their first full-length album, Entertainment!, appeared the following September, it rose to 45 in the U.K. album charts, an impressive showing given the uncompromising nature of their music. Critics on both sides of the Atlantic were impressed, and the group set out on well-received tours of North American, Britain, and Europe. In March 1981, Gang of Fourreleased their second album, the more contemplative Solid Gold, which became their first LP to chart in the United States, peaking at 190 on the album charts, while the track “What We All Want” also appeared on the Club Play chart. By the time the album was released, Dave Allen had dropped out of the band (he would go on to form Shriekback); Busta Jones, who had previously worked with Talking Heads and George Clinton, briefly took over for live work before Sara Lee (who had worked with Robert Fripp‘s League of Gentlemen) became GoF‘s official bassist. Lee‘s first album with the band, 1982’s Songs of the Free, was slightly more accessible than their previous work without robbing the sound of its power; one of the tracks, “I Love a Man in a Uniform,” received extensive club and college radio play, and its slinky rhythms even led to it being played on commercial R&B radio. GoF toured extensively in support, and were the first act to take the stage at the 1982 Us Festival, a massive music and technology event financed by Apple Computers co-founder Steve Wozniak.

While Songs of the Free broke Gang of Four to a larger audience in the United States, it happened as friction arose in the group, and Hugo Burnham left the band in early 1983. For their fourth album, 1983’s Hard, a drum machine took Burnham‘s place, while session musicians augmented GoF‘s lineup and Howard Albert and Ron Albert (who had previously worked with the Bee Gees) produced the sessions. Steve Goulding, who had kept time for Graham Parker & the Rumour, played drums on the band’s subsequent tour, which was documented on the 1984 album At the Palace, which was not released in the United States. Shortly afterwards, Gang of Four called it quits. They didn’t stay inactive for long; in 1987, Gill and King began making music together again, and in 1991 they released a Gang of Four album, Mall, a dance-friendly effort dominated by synthesizers and featuring Gail Ann Dorsey on bass. A variety of session musicians accompanied Gill and King on 1995’s Shrinkwrapped, a more aggressive set than Mall; in 1997, they once again retired the Gang of Four banner, and King dropped out of the music business for a while.

n 1998, Rhino Records released 100 Flowers Bloom, a career-spanning two-CD anthology that was compiled and annotated with the participation of Andy GillDave Allen, and Hugo Burnham. As more and more bands acknowledged Gang of Four‘s influence, interest in their music grew, and in 2004 the original lineup of GillKingAllen, and Burnhamreunited for an international concert tour. Demand was such that they hit the road again in 2005, and later that year they signed with V2 Records and released Return the Gift, in which they re-recorded 14 songs from their first three albums (the musicians insisted they were never happy with the drum sounds on their early releases). In 2006, Burnham bowed out of Gang of Four, and Mark Heaneysigned on as their drummer. Two years later, Dave Allen also left the lineup, with Thomas McNeicetaking over on bass. The band returned to the recording studio, and 2011’s Content became their first album of original material since Shrinkwrapped. The group toured extensively in support, but in 2012 King departed Gang of Four, and John “Gaoler” Sterry took over as lead vocalist. By the time the 2015 album What Happens Next was released, Mark Heaney was no longer working with Gang of Four, and Heaney and Jonny Finnegan both contributed drum tracks on the set. Alison Mosshart of the Kills and the Dead WeatherRobbie Furze of the Big Pink, and Gail Ann Dorsey all contributed vocals to the album. In April 2018, Gang of Four dropped a four-song EP, Complicit, produced by Ben Hillier; the EP included the topical track “Ivanka (Things You Can’t Have).”

Gang Of Four albums are a tricky business.

After a good ten years or so of dreaming about entering a recording studio a young group gets flung into the bear pit and expected to produce the goods. Most of the time, what emerges is a half-realised idea of their own ambitions yet sometimes the added pressure pushes the group to undreamt of heights.

Released thirty years ago Gang Of Four’s ‘Entertainment!’ is one such album. Blending punk with funk, visceral rock with modern European philosophy the record turned established templates inside out.

Lighting up the increasingly moribund post-punk scene the album has enjoyed a curious form of second life. More and more groups have emerged who are clearly influenced by Gang Of Four’s contention that rock music is made with your brain and not your cock.

Oi Bloc Party! Andy Gill wants his riffs back! And don’t get us started on Alex Kapranos… One of the most influential albums of the past ten years ‘Entertainment!’ has aged well, and still retains a stunning effect even after a thousand or so plays on the ClashMusic stereo.

Gang Of Four singer Jon King has agreed to talk us through ‘Entertainment!’ and reveals some of the secrets behind this mysterious and influential album…

We made ‘Entertainment!’ in The Workhouse, a studio on the Old Kent road , then a seedy highway through a depressed South London, but still glamorous compared to the misery of Leeds. We’d routined the songs for a week or so in a residential farmhouse with rehearsal room attached, where we also wrote Great Men. Going into the studio, we knew exactly what we would do, as the songs were all nailed and road tested . We recorded them fast , just as they were. Gill & I produced the session, alongside our manager Rob Warr, in only 3 weeks start to finish. We wanted the songs to be authentic and capture a moment in time with no decoration or overdubs or tracking or FX. We argued a lot about not using any outboard effect that might colour the performance in a misleading way so that what we did was real . When we finished it sounded like itself. EMI left us completely alone and, when we’d finished, after the playback, said only, in a mystified way: “Is this the demo?” to which we said “No. It’s the album”. To the record company’s credit, that was that. And it was put out without any polishing.

Love Like Anthrax
This was the first song Andy & I wrote where we felt we’d got to where we wanted to be. We were big fans of Godard’s movies, & loved the split screens and off-screen commentaries about what was going on in his great film “Numero Deux”. It seemed like a modern way to describe things, how stories can’t always be decoded from a single point of view and, among all the conflicting narratives, a story’s sense changes depending on where you sit. We played with ideas like this on the inside sleeve art, too. I’d written some words, a paean to a traumatising hangover – inspired by Raymond Chandler’s brilliant morning after description: “I woke up. An Axe split my head” – and, having talked about it for a while, wrote down on paper how the song would be before we ever played a note. Our plan was : heavy funky drums & bass throughout, 2x slabs of improvised guitar and two vocal sections where I sang fixed words and Andy commented on the words or wherever we were or whatever we were doing or whatever he was thinking about. This to make every performance different and not handcuff meanings. Andy’s guitar is brilliant, an echoof Hendrix at Rainbow Bridge, working the tremolo, using the pickups, bending the neck; and, live, sometimes destroying the guitar when the neck gives way under the assault. To me, the song is a moment in time freezeframed.

I Found that Essence Rare
There had been a cheesy magazine ad for a perfume, I forget which it was, that used this line. It summed up that lonely desire we all have to find something permanent and real and transformational in the middle of the relentless , oppressive programming and oppression we go through. Somehow we all end up doing, thinking and believing the same things but knowing at the same time it’s all lies and a conspiracy. That all the words we use lock us further into our own little jails of which we, of course, hold the keys. But don’t dare escape from. Discovering this line helped the rest come fast: “See the girl in the bikini, she doesn’t think so but she’s dressed for the H-Bomb” etc. It seemed just right that a two-piece swimsuit was named after nuclear tests in the Pacific. The tune, of early birth, goes: verse bridge chorus, verse bridge chorus middle 8 chorus out! Hugo wrote this in felt pen on his floor tom during the recording to remember it. Essence rocks, in a not entirely formulaic way. EMI loved it and wanted Essence to be the first single from Entertainment! Never missing a chance to miss a chance, we said no way, the song was too commercial (duh!) and wasn’t representative. We refused the release and succeeded in pisssing off our A&R team and lable manager. They moved their affections, what little they ever had any for us, to their new signing Duran Duran. Oh, Rio!

Corked up with the Ether
There’d been a report published in the mid 70’s that found the British Government guilty of torturing IRA suspects. They used to, among a smorgasbord of cruelties, make suspects stand up for hours in hoods while white noise was played at gross volumes to break their will. The Americans, years later, tweaked this format by playing hard rock to the holed up General Noriega in Panama until he surrendered. As US Sergeant Mark Hadsell said at the time: “These people haven’t heard heavy metal. They can’t take it. If you play it for 24 hours, your brain and body functions start to slide, your train of thought slows down and your will is broken. That’s when we come in and talk to them.” Yeah, dude.

Whatever, the report on what was being done in our name was shameful; reported back to us on TV, alongside some other world atrocity, while we were enjoying ourselves, unwinding at the end of the day, getting ready for fun and games. So the notion was for 2 voices , telling scripted parallel stories. One voice, the one who’s living his fine life, says “Locked in heaven’s lifestyle” while the other, at the same time, says “locked in Long Kesh” (the prison for IRA & UDF members in Northern Ireland). Etc. You get the picture. This one does this as the other does that. The run out chant “There may be oil in Rockall!”, was based on our paranoid notion that the reason the British annexed, in 1955, an ugly & tiny rock in the deep Atlantic was less about stopping the Russians spy on NATO missile tests than the fact there might be oil about to pillage. And it came to pass ! In 2007 the Brits announced a claim to vast swathes of the Atlantic for 350 miles around the rock! The first example of eco-colonialism!

Damaged Goods
Saturday afternoons, we wandered, walleyed, through the sun-bright aisles of Morrison’s supermarket in Leeds, looking for a 2-4-1 bargains and generic baked beans. The hopeless in-store slogan at the point of sale was: “The change will do you good” meaning “change” as in money and “change” as in switch store. Someone got paid for this rubbish!. I found this good starter for words about a doomed relationship where legover had become, maybe, too much of a good thing. Or at any rate, a thing. Andy punctuates the main lyric with a call and response thing and sings the iconic mid section “Damaged goods, send them back” words. The music’s cute: alternate the guitar and bass duh duh dink! Duh duh dink! & build the song around this R&B clatter among dynamic drop outs where everyone got to feature. We didn’t want a pop structure. We’d had it with dominant, subdominant, tonic chord progressions. So we had none, instead. The song was on our debut Fast Product EP, which became a big indie hit . But we weren’t paid a cent for our work, majorly ripped off, so we re-recorded it for ‘Entertainment!’ I regret not punching out the bloke who ran the label. (Note to self: do this before you die) We’re often asked “why did you sign to a major label if you’re so alternative?” One answer: EMI at least paid us for the records it sold.

5:45
The melodica’s a fine instrument: a signature sound, cheap and disposable and not part of rockism. I have a red one. Augustus Pablo had one, too. Reggae music, in the late 70’s, was the most innovative pop music around; pushing the latest technology, playing with form, talking about daily life; it just owned guitar chords on the offbeat. We didn’t want to copy this but were inspired by dub. Here we’re, again, singing about how it is to watch TV and just there on screen a few feet away-there!- are people being shot, abused, wailing, suffering, while we’re in party hats. Andy says: “How can I eat my tea, with all that BLOOD flowing on the television”. It’s a good question. I don’t know the answer. Villains need to be taken to the tumbrils, still. & “Guerrilla War struggle is the new entertainment!”.

Contract
Being an Art student is great. You look at pictures and films and events and think about what things mean and there’s always a point of view to have. But rock music generally stays in the box of love, good or bad, and kicking out the jams. Shagging, getting fucked up & fighting are great, of course (the best ever lyrics on the holy trinity in Willie Dixon’s brilliant “Wang Dang Doodle”- “We gonna to break out all of the windows/we gonna kick down all the doors/We gonna pitch a wang dang doodle all night long/All night long, All night long, All night long” Brilliant!), but it’s not all there is. Rock lyrics are so conservative. It’s the invisible 6th member of the band talking, the accountant, asking “is this commercial?”. When we recorded ‘Entertainment!’, I was very interested in Situationism and Andy & I were excited by the ideas of Foucault & Lacan & behind all this how much of what we do or think is a construct. Our professor, the brilliant TJ Clarke, who later became a friend, challenged us to deconstruct what we received and hunt down the meaning within the meaning. We used to have a running gag about what our songs would be if they were pictures. It’s not funny, unless you were there, and not even then, but ‘Contract’ is, to me, Manet’s “Bar at the Folie Bergére”. Are we the point or is the picture the point or is the point the point?

Glass
Musicians mostly start off working in genre. It’s the path of least resistance; you knock out the styles you’ve heard or copy the chops of the musicians you rate. After a while you might push it a bit or , later on, file it all away for reference and do your own thing, because , while imitation is the best form of flattery, it’s a bit boring if that’s all you do. But mixing it up is fun, too, and here, we felt good that we’d written what we thought was a cool pop song, even though there’s no bridge or chorus like there should be and it doesn’t follow the Tin Pan Alley rules. Recording it, we wondered whether the fact that it carried a tune was something we could allow ourselves, like an extra slice of angel cake. Were these mellifluous notes a surrender , false consciousness, was a debate that ran & ran late into the night after Hugo & Dave had long gone from the control room. The great guitar riff is melodic , there’s a tune in the vocal and the rhythm section is solid. We recorded this, like the others, in take after take, old style, until we’d nailed it. 2 inch tape could be cut up and spliced but it was bad news , especially with the disengaged sound engineer we’d been dumped with. So this take is a take.

Natural’s Not In It
No, it’s not. Nor is there a verse, bridge, chorus or key change. One monster R&B riff, relentless, drop outs, everyone gets a turn, the words self explanatory, on and on, until it stops. It was a hard tune to get down as it’s all feel and drive and energy and this is often hard to get in a studio without a crowd pushing you to it. At the right time, in the right place, it does the right thing. We’d played this one a few times and it was all there.

At Home He’s A Tourist
Sometimes, you get lucky and a line comes that makes everything easy. Suddenly getting the answer to a question when you turn off and think about something else. Thrown-ness – if that’s a word at all – was something we puzzled over. Why, if everything like it is, do so many things seem ersatz, phoney . But it’s not phoney if you know it’s phoney, as Truman Capote said of Holly Golightly “she’s not a phoney because she’s a real phoney”.

So, with this present from nowhere, Gill was inspired and created the perfect existential squawl, different every time it’s played, but on ‘Entertainment!’ This is what happened that afternoon in a single take. No assemblage, pro-tools confection, just the strings being hit and screaming in pain as they’re bashed and cajoled into a beautiful anti-solo that is all abot the now and no about the maybe. We thought this song was a mutant disco thing, aty a time when it was not done to like dance music, when funk and rock had to be kept in separate rooms for fera of miscegenation. But the genie was out of the box! Ain’t no stopping us now! We even used a delay on the vocals!

Not Great Men 
Written in an afternoon in wet Wales in the weeks just before the recording, this was the youngest song on the album. The song felt funky, rocky, tough. It is about what it is about.

Return the Gift
You know, you get these offers that promise so much and, to make sure you know they’re value, you can even send them, back. The advice here, just do it. But not like Nike! A signature guitar figure that propels the tune from here to eternity. We wrote this, I recall, on an acoustic guitar, playing it into a useless cassette machine that crunched tapes like they were dry roasted peanuts in a bar. Playing it back to the boys in the rehearsal room was an effort of hearing, the sparkling, bitter guitar notes transformed into a mush of middle frequencies. But they got it, and the rhythm section do everything that’s necessary to feel the funk.

Guns Before Butter
Goebbels said “when I hear the word culture I reach for my revolver”. The inspiration was John Heartfield’s wonderful photo montages that undermined the vicious Nazi nonsense like this. Here a little guy is quaking in his boots at the lust for Blood & iron and order and control and wonders how he ever got sucked up into this evil. Sung over the relentless machine-like noise that will never end, except in hurt.

Gang Of Four – “Damaged Goods” Single cover photo (A’ Side)

GANG OF FOUR DAMAGED GOODS 1 (2)

Gang Of Four – “Entertainment!” Album cover photo (front)

GANG OF FOUR ENTERTAINMENT 1 (2)

Gang Of Four Photo

GANG OF FOUR PHOTO 1 (2)

 

Gang Of Four Band’s Interview on Clash Music

Gang Of Four – “Damaged Goods” Single Version Video file link on YouTube

Gang Of Four – Damaged Goods Album Version Video file link on YouTube

Gang Of Four – “Entertainment!” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Facebook

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Discogs

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Twitter

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Setlist Fm

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Apple Music

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Spotify

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Instagram

Gang Of Four Band’s Homepage

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Billboard Gang Of Four Band’s Page on Robert Christgau

Gang Of Four Band’s Page on NPR

Gang Of Four Band’s Page/Full Albums/Download Links on Lágrima Psicodélica Blog

 

7/12-Singles/E.P.s Classical/Ost/Stage And Screen/Theme 1970s John Christopher Williams – ” Cavatina”

Classical/Ost/Stage And Screen/Theme 1970s

John Christopher Williams (Melbourne, Australia)

Instrumental

Cover Version

” Cavatina” (written by Stanley Myers) B’ Side single released on Cube Records (BUG 80) on 30th June 1978

Cavatina” is a 1970 classical guitar piece by British composer Stanley Myers written for the film The Walking Stick (1970), and popularised as the theme from The Deer Hunter some eight years later. As the Italian diminutive of cavatacavatina is a musical term frequently applied to any simple, melodious air.

John Williams – “Cavatina” B’ Side single photo

john williams cavatina photo

John Christopher Williams – “Cavatina” Video file link on YouTube

John Christopher Williams Artist’s Homepage

John Christopher Williams – Artist’s Interview file link on Classical Guitar Magazine

John Christopher Williams Artist’s Page on Facebook

John Christopher Williams Artist’s Page on Discogs

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage /Psychobilly/Punk/Rockabilly U.S.A. 1970s The Cramps – “Human Fly”

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage /Psychobilly/Punk/Rockabilly

The Cramps (New York, U.S.A.)

“Human Fly” (written by Lux Interior / Ivy Rorschach) A’ Side single released on Vengeance Records (668) in 1978,  Recorded in Memphis,Tennessee,  Oct. 1977. 

Line-up/Credits :

Producer : Alex Chilton

Lux Interior (Erick Purkhiser) – vocals (March 1976 – February 2009; his death)

Poison Ivy (Kristy Wallace) – lead guitar (March 1976 – February 2009)

Bryan Gregory (Greg Beckerleg) – guitar (April 1976 – May 1980; died January 10, 2001)

Nick Knox – drums (July 1977 – January 1991; died June 15, 2018)

Lyrics :

‘m a human fly
I spell (it) F-L-Y
I say buzz buzz buzz
and it’s just because
I’m a human fly
and I don’t know why
I’ve got 96 tears
and 96 eyes
I’ve got a garbage brain
it’s driving me insane
and I don’t like ___________
so push that pest aside
baby I won’t care
cause baby i don’t scare
cause I’m a reborn maggot
using germ warfare
I’m a human fly
I ______________________
I say buzz buzz buzz
and it’s just because
I’m an unzipped fly
and I don’t know why
and I don’t know why
but I say buzzzz
(rock it right?)
_________________________
but I don’t know why
I just don’t know why
The Cramps – “Human Fly” Single photo 
the cramps human fly single photo 2
the cramps human fly single photo front (2)

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s New Wave/Post Punk Rock U.K. 1970s Joy Division – “No Love Lost”

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s New Wave/Post Punk Rock U.K. 1970s

Joy Division (Salford, Greater Manchester, U.K.)

“No Love Lost” (written by Joy Division) A2 track included on the 7-inch E.P.  “An Ideal For Living”

Released on Enigma Records (PSS 139) in June 1978, recorded at Pennine Sound Studio, in December 1977

Line-up/Credits :

Bass – Peter Hook

Drums – Stephen Morris

Engineer [Uncredited] – Paul Adshead

Guitar, Design [Cover Design] – Bernard Albrecht

Photography By – Gareth Davy

Plated By – EG

Vocals – Ian Curtis

Original 7″ EP edition. 1000 copies, released on the band’s own label. The sleeve was printed on a 14″ x 14″ piece of thin cardstock and then folded into four squares.

Lyrics :

So long sitting here,
Didn’t hear the warning.
Waiting for the tape to run.
We’ve been moving around in different situations,
Knowing that the time would come.
Just to see you torn apart,
Witness to your empty heart.
I need it.
I need it.
I need it.
Through the wire screen, the eyes of those standing outside looked in
At her as into the cage of some rare creature in a zoo.
In the hand of one of the assistants she saw the same instrument
Which they had that morning inserted deep into her body.
She shuddered
Instinctively.
No life at all in the house of dolls.
No love lost.
No love lost.
You’ve been seeing things,
In darkness, not in learning,
Hoping that the truth will pass.
No life underground, wasting never changing,
Wishing that this day won’t last.
To never see you show your age,
To watch until the beauty fades,
I need it.
I need it.
I need it.
Two-way mirror in the hall,
They like to watch everything you do,
Transmitters hidden in the walls,
So they know everything you say is true,
Turn it on,
Don’t turn it on,
Turn it on.
Songwriters: Bernard Sumner / Ian Kevin Curtis / Peter Hook / Stephen Paul David Morris
Joy Division – “An Ideal For Living” 7-inch E.P. album cover photo (front)
JOY DIVISION AN IDEAL FOR LIVING 1

 

Joy Division – “No Love Lost” Video file link on YouTube

Joy Division – “No Love Lost” Video file link on DailyMotion

Joy Division Band’s page on Spotify