Embryo – “No Place To Go” (1973)

Band : Embryo (Musical collective from Munich, Germany, founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann)

Country Of Origin : Germany

Members :

Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, vocals, marimba, drums, 1969-2018), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flute, violin, 1969-79, 1985-89), Lothar Meid (bass, 1971), Jimmy Jackson(organ, 1971), Ralph Fischer (bass, 1969-73), Dieter Miekautsch (piano, clavinet, 1972-75), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion, 1986-present), Wolfgang Paap (drums, 1971), Ingo Schmidt (saxophone, 1971), John Kelly (guitar, 1969-72), Charlie Mariano (soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, flute, bamboo flute, nagasuram, 1972-77), Roman Bunka (guitar, saz, vocals, percussion, bass, oud, 1972-80, 1988-96), Hans Fischer (flute, percussion, vocals, 1971), Jörg Evers (bass, 1971-72), Dave King (bass, 1972-73), Uwe Müllrich (bass, 1974-80), Maria Archer (vocals, percussion, 1975), Michael Wehmeyer(percussion, vocals, keyboards, 1983-84, 2002-present), Butze Fischer (drums, percussion, 1977-?), Friedemann Josch (flute, 1983-84), Julius Golombeck (guitar, percussion, oud, vocals, 1985-96), Gerald Luciano (bass, 1985), Lamidi Ayankunle (drums, vocals, 1986-?), Rabiu Ayandokun (drums, 1986-?), Marque Lowenthal (piano, 1988), Paolo Cardoso (bass, 1988), Paramashivam Pilai (vocals, tavil, 1988-?), Nie Xizhi (erhu, muyü, sheng, gaohu, 1995-present), Chris Karrer (oud, 1995-present), Lothar Stahl (drums, marimba), Jens Pollheide, Mik Quantius

Related Artists :

Amon Düül II, Checkpoint Charlie, Dissidenten, Mikrokosmos, Missus Beastly, Moira, Sadja

Track : “No Place To Go” (A1, written by Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard, Dieter Miekautsch, Roman Bunka)

Album : “We Keep On” (Band’s sixth studio album)

Label : BASF (20 21865-1)

Date/Year Of Release : 1973

Category/Music Genres : Jazz Rock, Krautrock, Progressive Rock, Germany, 1970s (Tracks)

Embryo – “No Place To Go”

Video on YouTube

The track is included on the album “We Keep On”, 1973 (A1, opening track)

“We Keep On” album (LP BASF Systems BC 21865 / CD Disconforme Records 1936 (1999) includes two lengthy bonus tracks “Ticket to India” and “Flute, Saz and Marimba” with different order of the tracks).

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Video on YouTube 

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Album cover photo (front)

Album photo (A’ Side)

Image result for embryo we keep on basf

Track-list

01. Abdul Malek (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 3:15
02. Don’t Come Tomorrow (Christian Burchard) – 3:48
03. Ehna, Ehna, Abu Lele (Roman Bunka, Christian Burchard) – 8:43
04. Hackbrett-Dance (Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 3:54
05. No Place To Go (Christian Burchard) – 12:27
06. Flute And Saz (Roman Bunka, Charlie Mariano, Christian Burchard) – 5:57
Total Time: 38:09
Bonuses:
07. Ticket To India (Christian Burchard) – 15:49
08. Flute, Saz And Marimba (Christian Burchard) – 8:35

Line-up 

– Roman Bunka / guitar, saxophone, vocals, percussion, bass (6)
– Christian Burchard / drums, vocals, percussion, marimba, vibes, hackbrett, Mellotron
– Charlie Mariano / alto & soprano saxes, flute, nagasuram, bamboo flute
– Dieter Miekautsch / acoustic & electric pianos, bass piano on the clavinet

Credits

Design – Holger Matthies

Lacquer Cut By – PF

Liner Notes – Rainer Blome

Liner Notes [Translation] – Mary McGlory

Producer – Embryo (3)

Producer, Photography By [Portraits] – Othmar Schreckeneder

Written-By – Mariano (tracks: A1 to B2, B4), Burchard, Miekautsch (tracks: A1, B1, B4), Bunka (tracks: A1 to B1, B3, B4)

Information about the band

Musical collective from Munich (Germany), founded in 1969 by Christian Burchard and Edgar Hofmann. Considered as one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s.
In 1981, Uve Müllrich and Michael Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.
Embryo have continued for over 40 years with Christian Burchard always in charge and an ever changing international cast of musicians including talents from North Africa, India, China, etc., as well as occasionally featuring top jazz names like Mal Waldron and Charlie Mariano and luminaries of the Krautrock scene (source : “Discogs”).

EMBRYO (not to be confused with Italian and Swedish death metal bands of the same name) are a musical collective from Munich who, lead by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard, boast the participation of some 400+ musicians since their beginnings in 1970. Over the years, the band went from classic space rock to jazz fusion, then Burchard soon started travelling the world and recording LPs with African bands and Middle Eastern musicians. They are still going strong and their 30 or so albums cover a wide spectrum of styles, but the constant remains a blend of Krautrock, fusion and ethnic music.

Of particular interest to progsters are four of their earlier albums: “Rache” (heavy, JETHRO TULL inspired), “Steig Aus” (for some warmer, jazzy prog), “Father, Son and Holy Ghost” (lots of ethnic influences) and “We Keep On” (a convincing blend of rock, ethnic and jazz). For fans who have already acquired the taste, “Zack Glück” (’80) is pleasantly quirky and more focussed than the rest of their repertoire; “Reise” (’79) is noteworthy for some interesting Indian fusion tracks; and “Opal” (’70), their very first, is considered their psychedelic masterpiece. For some samplers of more recent material, the album “Ni Hau” (’96), featuring music from China and Mongolia, and the double live cd “Istanboul-Casablanca – Tour 98” are particularly recommended.

If you’re into Krautrock and are a wee bit curious to see what a jazzy FAUST, AMON DÜÜL II or GURU GURU sounds like, you could start with any of the first four albums mentioned above (source : “Progarchives”).

One of the most original and innovative Krautrock bands, Embryo fused traditional ethnic music with their own jazzy space rock style. Over an existence spanning decades, during which Christian Burchard became the only consistent member, the group traveled the world, playing with hundreds of different musicians and releasing over 20 records.

Originally a jazzy space rock band, Embryo were formed in 1969 in Munich, Germany, by former R&B and jazz organist Christian Burchard (vibraphone, hammer dulcimer, percussion, marimba), Edgar Hofmann (saxophone), Lothar Meid (bass), Jimmy Jackson (organ), Dieter Serfas (drums, percussion), Wolfgang Paap (drums), Ingo Schmidt(saxophone), and John Kelly (guitar). However, the lineup was already different by the time sessions for their debut album began. The resulting record, Opal (1970), is considered Embryo’s masterpiece of their early, more psychedelic sound. By the time of Embryo’s Rache (1971), the group was already adding ethnic touches to its music.

In 1972, the same year they played at the Olympic Games in Munich, Embryo were invited by the Goethe Institute to tour Northern Africa and Portugal. In Morocco, the band was fascinated by the different tonal scales used by Moroccan musicians, profoundly shaping the group’s music to come. In 1973, the band was joined by saxophonist Charlie Mariano and guitarist Roman Bunka, who were both influential in moving Embryo toward their genre-blending mixture of space rock and ethnic sounds. We Keep On, released in 1973, was the most successful album in the group’s career.

However, after Surfin’ (1974) and Bad Heads & Bad Cats (1975), Burchard decided Embryo were moving in too commercial a direction and led them on an eight-month excursion to India, where they met local musicians. Shobha Gurtu, an Indian singer the bandmembers met during their travels, would later record an album with them, 1979’s Apo Calypso. Embryo also set up their own record label, Schneeball, with the rock band Checkpoint Charlie during this time, releasing such albums as 1979’s Embryo’s Reise and 1982’s La Blama Sparozzi – Zwischenzonen on the imprint. Embryo also took off on a two-year journey through the Middle East, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, during which the band’s bus broke down in Tehran near the end of the Iranian Revolution in 1981; this musical expedition was captured by the documentary film Vagabunden-Karawane. After touring Asia, the Middle East, and Egypt during the early ’80s, Embryo released their first studio album in seven years, Zack Gluck, in 1984. The band then toured Africa and became involved with Nigeria’s Yoruba Dun Dun Ensemble.

However, after internal conflicts, Embryo split up. Burchard continued under the Embryo name with new musicians while a new group, Embryo’s Dissidenten, was formed. Embryo continued to release both new and archival recordings into the 21st century, including 2006’s Embryonnck, a collaboration with the No-Neck Blues Band. However, Burchard suffered a stroke in 2016, which effectively ended his career as a musician, and his daughter Marja took over leadership of the group. Christian Burcharddied in January 2018 at the age of 71 (source : “All Music”).

Embryo is a musical collective from Munich which has been active since 1969, although its story started in the mid-1950s in Hof where Christian Burchard and Dieter Serfas met for the first time at the age of 10. It was one of the most important German jazz-rock bands during the 1970s and has also been described as “the most eclectic of the Krautrock bands.”

History

In 1969 the band was founded by multi instrumentalist Christian Burchard (drums, vibraphone, santur, keyboard) and Edgar Hofmann (saxophone, flutes). To date more than 400 musicians have played with the collective, some, such as Charlie Mariano, Trilok Gurtu, Ramesh Shotham, Marty Cook, Yuri Parfenov, Allan Praskin, X.Nie, Nick McCarthy, Monty Waters and Mal Waldron, have played on multiple occasions. Longtime members are Edgar Hofmann (sax, violin), Dieter Serfas (drums), Roman Bunka (guitar, oud), Uve Müllrich (bass), Michael Wehmeyer (keyboard), Chris Karrer (guitar, oud, violin, sax), Lothar Stahl (marimba, drums), and Jens Polheide (bass, flute).

With Ton Steine Scherben, they were founders of the first German independent label Schneeball in 1976.

In 1979 the band started a nine-month tour to India by bus which is documented in the movie “Vagabunden Karawane”. Embryo developed from jazzy Krautrock to a world music band which is able to merge different styles and trends. Many of their albums originated during collective journeys on 4 continents. The band played many festivals around the globe: in India (Mumbai Jazz 1979), England (Reading 1973), Nigeria (Port Harcourt Jazz 1987), Japan (Wakayama 1991) to name a few. In July 2008, Embryo was awarded the German World Music Award RUTH 2008 at the TFF Rudolstadt Festival.

In 1981, Müllrich and Wehmeyer left Embryo to form “Embryo’s Dissidenten” who soon became Dissidenten.

On the road to Marokko in March 2016 Christian Burchard had a stroke. Since then Marja Burchard (drums, vibraphone, vocals, trombone, keyboard), daughter of Christian Burchard, who grew up with the band, is leading Embryo.

On January 17, 2018 Christian Burchard passed away in Munich. He was 71 years old (source : “Revolvy”/”Wikipedia”).

Discography 

Discography

1970: Opal (Ohr)

1971: Embryo’s Rache (United Artists)

1972: Father Son and Holy Ghosts (United Artists)

1972: Steig aus (Brain, a.k.a. This Is Embryo), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: Rocksession (Brain), featuring Mal Waldron

1973: We Keep On (BASF), featuring Charlie Mariano

1975: Surfin (Buk), featuring Charlie Mariano

1976: Bad Heads and Bad Cats (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Live (April), featuring Charlie Mariano

1977: Apo Calypso (April), featuring Trilok Gurtu and Shobha Gurtu on one track

1979: Embryo’s Reise (Schneeball/Indigo)

1980: Embryo / Karnataka College of Percussion / Charlie Mariano – Life (Schneeball)

1980: Anthology (Materiali Sonori, compilation reissued on CD as Every Day Is Okay in1992)

1982: La blama sparozzi / Zwischenzonen (Schneeball)

1984: Zack Glück (Materiali Sonori)

1985: Embryo & Yoruba Dun Dun Orchestra Feat. Muraina Oyelami (Schneeball)

1985: Africa (Materiali Sonori)

1989: Turn Peace (Schneeball), featuring Mal Waldron

1994: Ibn Battuta (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Marty Cook on one track

1996: Ni Hau (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Xizhi Nie

1998: Live in Berlin (Schneeball)

1999: Istanbul–Casablanca Tour 1998 (Schneeball/Indigo), featuring Alan Praskin

1999: Invisible Documents (Disconforme)

2000: One Night in Barcelona (Recorded at the Joan Miró Foundation) (Disconforme),featuring Yuri Parfenov

2001: Live 2000, Vol. 1 (Schneeball)

2001: Live 2001, Vol. 2 (Schneeball)

2003: Bremen 1971 (Garden of Delights)

2003: Hallo Mik (Schneeball/Indigo, live recordings)

2006: Embryonnck with the No-Neck Blues Band(Schneeball/Staubgold/Sound@One)

2006: News (Ultimate)

2007: Live im Wendland (Schneeball), anti-nuclear solidarity concert 2005 in Gorleben

2007: For Eva , 1967 recording featuring Mal Waldron

2008: Freedom in Music , featuring X. Nie

2008: Live at Burg Herzberg Festival 2007 (Trip in Time)

2008: Wiesbaden 1972 (Garden of Delights)

2010: Embryo 40 (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

2011: Memory Lane, Vols. 1-3 (Download only), featuring Mal Waldron

2016: It Do (Trikont/Indigo, compilation)

External links 

Embryo Band’s Homepage

Embryo Band’s Page on Facebook

Embryo Band’s Page on Spotify

Embryo Band’s Page on Last Fm

Charlie Mariano Tribute Page

Embryo Album Reviews on Gnosis2000.Net

Embryo Band’s Documentary on IMDb

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on Rock & Roll Archives

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album Download Link on 7Digital

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Album on Google Play

Embryo – “We Keep On” Full Albun on Apple Music

 

 

 

Hard Rock, Heavy Blues Rock, Heavy Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Bedlam – “Set Me Free”

Bedlam – “Set Me Free” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Hard Rock, Heavy Blues Rock, Heavy Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1970s

Band :

Bedlam (Birmingham, U.K.)

Members :

Cozy Powell (drums), Dave Ball (guitar), Denny Ball (bass), Frank Aiello (vocals)
Related Artists :
Big Bertha, Ideal Milk, The Ace Kefford Stand, Cozy Powell’s Hammer
Also known as :
The Beast

Track :

‘Set Me Free” (written by Bedlam) B5 track (closing track) included on the album “Bedlam”

Album :

“Bedlam” released on Chrysalis Records ( CHR 1048) in 1973

Image result for bedlam 1973

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Full Album Video on YouTube

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

Vocals – Francesco Aiello

Bass – Dennis Ball

Guitar – Dave Ball (2)

Drums – Cozy Powell

Keyboards – Felix Pappalardi (tracks: A1 to A3, A5, B1 to B5), Max Middleton (tracks: A4)

Credits :

Cover [Concept] – Dave Ball (2)

Engineer – Bob D’Orleans

Engineer [Assistant] – Daniel Jackson Turbeville

Lacquer Cut By – Ray Staff

Photography By [Cover], Design – Rowland Sherman

Producer – Felix Pappalardi

Produced For – Chrysalis Records

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Chrysalis Records Ltd.

Published By – Chrysalis Music Ltd.

Published By – Island Music Ltd.

Recorded At – Olympic Studios

Remixed At – Record Plant, N.Y.C.

Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Track-list :

01.Believe In You 3:58
02.Hot Lips 4:33
03.Sarah 3:44
04.Sweet Sister Mary 2:48
05.Seven Long Years 3:43
06.The Beast 5:27
07.Whiskey And Wine 2:31
08.Looking Through Love’s Eyes 2:53
09.Putting On The Flesh 3:52
10.Set Me Free 4:18

Information about the album/band/track :

“All Music”

Bedlam (originally known as Beast when it formed in 1972) was a British hard rock band featuring singer Frank Aiello (from Truth), guitarist Dave Ball (from Procol Harum), bassist Dennis Ball (formerly with Long John Baldry), and drummer Cozy Powell (formerly with Jeff Beck). They made one self-titled album produced by Felix Pappalardi (producer of Cream, member of Mountain) in 1973, before breaking up in 1974.

“Solid Boy Music Blog”

This band should have been as big as Led Zeppelin. The signs were all there, moody and magnificent blues guitarist of the highest caliber in the form of Dave Ball (from Procol Harum) a firm rock, thunderous bass – Dennis Ball (formerly with Long John Baldry) – the voice of a banshee cockney Frank Aiello (from Truth) and Mr Cozy Powell on drums. Bedlam were signed to Chrysalis Records and released their self-titled debut in 1973 remains a classic,a true gem of hard rock, Powell broke up the band in 1974 to pursue other projects.
The self-titled studio album is a very solid slice of bluesy, funky hard rock, produced by Felix Pappalardi (Mountain), that surprisingly didn’t garner more attention than it did. Not too far removed from what was coming out of the Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Cactus, Mountain, Budgie, Free, or Nazareth camps at the time, Bedlam showed a penchant for memorable, heavy rocking songs that featured the stellar musical interplay of Powell and the Ball brothers, plus the powerful vocals of Aiello. Though many tunes have a blues background, Ball’s riffs are heavy, especially on tracks like “Believe in You”, “Hot Lips”, and “Seven Long Years”, but there’s also a funkiness at times that reminds of what Deep Purple where soon to jump into on the Burn and Stormbringer albums. For those who crave those heavy rockin’, blues & boogie sounds of bands like Cactus and Mountain, check out the monstrous “Whiskey and Wine” and the hard driving “Putting On the Flesh” for some distorted riffs and crashing drum fills. “Set Me Free” is a bruising heavy rock track, with Aiello sounding a bit like Jack Bruce and the rest of the band really getting down and dirty for some fine proto-metal. It’s songs like this that makes it mind boggling that this band didn’t get more attention.
Considered one of England’s best drummers and a lot of demand for rock and pop Cozy Powell was almost legendary for a heavy hit style that could be done to work with many types of rock music, whether for the thundering pop productions helmed by Mickie Most Black Sabbath Emerson Lake & Powell or even his own solo work (notably “Dance with the Devil” which was a major English hit in 1973)
Powell began his professional music career in 1965 with sorcerers eventually decommissioning work with Jeff Beck after Beck left the Yardbirds in 1971, Powell formed Bedlam, but eventually abandoned this project to produce singles such as “Dance with the Devil” He later imageas Cozy Powell’s Hammer, which broke up in 1975 after a brief sabbatical, he joined Rainbow helps to give the band a section thunderous rhythm before exiting after four years and four albums in 1980, always in demand for the drum seat, he alternated between session work and working in different bands, including the Michael Schenker Group, Whitesnake and Black Sabbath never staying in one band for very long
In 1996, he worked with former Fleetwood Mac guitarist Peter Green on his long-awaited comeback tour at the time of his death on April 5, 1998 he was recovering from a foot injury which had sidelined him from touring work with guitarist Yngvie Malmsteen He was driving on the M4 towards Bristol when he apparently lost control of his car (due toto bad weather) slamming into the center divider of the highway, he died some hours later in hospital. Thanks to adamus67 for this review.
“What Frank Is Listening To”
The first thing that hits you in the face about this LP is the sleeve that could be a Black Sabbath sleeve but unfortunately Bedlam steer away from the hard rock that Black Sabbath espoused (rock bordering on metal) and cover the familiar hard rock, blues based, music so popular on both sides of the Atlantic between about 1968 – 1974.
Think Mott the Hoople, Mountain, Blind Faith, Bad Company, Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, Blue Cheer, Cactus, Humble Pie, Rainbow, Free, Groundhogs, Bloodrock.
If you don’t like any of those bands then stop reading now.
Frown you might at this music but it’s not that far from Bedlam to The Cult or The Darkness. And thelatter are acceptable to the musical intelligentsia. No?
Anyway, like most of their compadres on the hard rock blues scene Bedlam have a pedigree that is impeccable even though they are a second tier “super group” of sorts …
Allmusic: “Bedlam (originally known as Beast when it formed in 1972) was a British hard rock band featuring singer Frank Aiello (from Truth), guitarist Dave Ball (from Procol Harum), bassist Dennis Ball (formerly with Long John Baldry), and drummer Cozy Powell (formerly with Jeff Beck). They made one self-titled album produced by Felix Pappalardi (producer of Cream, member of Mountain) in 1973, before breaking up in 1974″.
Bedlam are never less than proficient. Unfortunately they never struck gold unlike most of the aforesaid mentioned acts and rarely do they add anything new to the genre. This, their one album, is what you would expect and they hit all the genre milestones: blues hard rock, blues power ballads, blues rock with supernatural thematic overtones, blues country boogie, funky blues.
Unfortunately all they needed was one hit …

Photos related to the album/band/track :

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Album cover photo (front)

Image result for bedlam 1973

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Album  photo (B’ Side)

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Album  photo (B’ Side)

Image result for bedlam 1973 CHRYSALIS

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Album cover photo (back)

Bedlam Band’s Photos

Image result for dave ball procol harum

BEDLAM 1 (2)

Cozy Powell of rock group Bedlam (the band was then known as The Beast) performing in Copenhagen, Denmark, March 1973. (Photo by Jan Persson/Getty Images)

Bedlam : News Photo

Image result for poster

Bedlam, Marquee, London, 1973

Links related to the album/band/track :

Bedlam – “Set Me Free” Video on YouTube

Bedlam – “Bedlam” Full Album Video on YouTube

Bedlam Band’s Page on Spotify

Bedlam – “Live In London 1973” Full Album on Spotify

Bedlam Band’s Page on Discogs

Bedlam Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Bedlam – “Live In London” Full Album on Apple Music

Cozy Powell – “The Bedlam Years” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

Bedlam Band’s Interview on It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine Blog

 

Ambient, Electronic, Fusion, Jazz Rock, Krautrock, Minimal, New Age, World Music, Multinational, 1970s (Tracks) Between – “Samum”

Between – “Samum” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Ambient/Electronic/Fusion/Jazz Rock/Krautrock/Minimal/New Age/World Music Multinational 1970s (Tracks) 

Band :

Between (Multinational, Argentina, Germany, U.S.A.) based in München, Bayern, Germany

Also known as :

Between the Chairs, Gruppe Between

Track :

“Samum” (written by Roberto Détrée, Peter Michael Hamer) B3 track (closing track) included on the album “And The Waters Opened” 

Album :

“And The Waters Opened”  released on Vertigo Records ( 6360 612) in 1973

Image result for between and the waters opened

Between – “And The Waters Opened”  Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Between – “And The Waters Opened”  Full Album Video on YouTube

Line-up/Credits :

Roberto Détrée / guitar, cello, harp
Peter Michael Hamel / keyboards, vocals
Robert Eliscu / oboe, oboe d’Amore
Cottrell Black / percussion

With:
Duru Omson / bamboo flute, percussion & voice (1,5,6)
Walter Bachauer (“Fabian Arkas”) / electronics (3)

Cover [Cover Design] – Guntram Holdgrün

Producer, Engineer – Ulrich Kraus

Track-List :

1. And The Waters Opened (10:51)
2. Uroboros (5:33)
3. Syn (5:52)
4. Devotion (3:43)
5. Happy Stage (11:14)
6. Samum (5:36)

Total Time: 42:49

Bonus tracks on 2006 remaster:
1. Journey To The Ixtland (4:30)

8. Kalenda Maya (3:01)
9. Former Times (2:20)

Tracks 1, 8 & 9 are previously unreleased bonus tracks, recorded April 4 1976
Eine Produktion des Bayerischen Rundfunks

Information about the album/band/track :

Founded in Munich, Germany in 1970 (as Between The Chairs) – Ceased activity around 1980

Peter Michael Hamel founded Between, an international band specialised in improvisational / « ethnic » rock music. The name Between comes from the fact that Hamel’s music is originaly “in-between”, always making a combination between “popular music” and “serious music”. The classical musician Robert Eliscu (born American), responsible of oboe parts in POPOL VUH can be considered as the major member of the musical tribe next to Peter Michael Hamel. With a small community of six members, BETWEEN recorded its first album “Einstieg” in 1971. It directly announces the musical orientation to come, timeless ethnic rock compositions, mixing together several acoustic instruments (bongo, flute.) to folk and jazz. “And the waters openened” recorded in 1973 carries on improvisations and acoustic exploration, played in a rather “spacey” rock atmosphere, sometimes closed to krautrock, weird flavour. “Dharana” (1974) is seen as a classic album and marks a new step in the launch of “world” music. It contains long epic, acoustic pieces with a few minimalist, oriental accents. “Hesse Between Music” (1975) is a concept album, always improvised, featuring Indian scales and recitation. During and after BETWEEN’s career, the front man Peter Michael Hamel has developed the possibilities of spiritual effects of music on mind thanks to a great variety of solo albums in search of East meets West.

Between was named Between because the music they made was sitting between the chairs back then and was reaching far beyond genre borders or the traditional segregation of E- and U-Musik (E for “ernst” / serious, U für “unterhaltende” / entertaining). This difference may be still alive in some highbrow dinosaur’s brain and was (sometimes still is) made to separate the so called popular (i.e. proletarian) from the bourgeois culture. Alas, today’s situation is more comfortable (and difficult to a certain extend). But, this is a review for a record not a sociology seminar talking Bourdieu’s “Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste” or something like that. (But, well, while I’m at it: go read it, it’s worth it!)

So, Between was Peter Michael Hamel’s brainchild who is a German composer and music theorist (whose records are all great!). Born out of friendship with a few international friends who had a background either in classical or pop music (to stress that distinction again). “And The Waters Opened” was their second record, released in 1973 and it’s heavily influenced by the music of Carl Orff. (Listen to Robert Eliscu’s oboe – which can also be heard on a lot of Popol Vuh records –and if you’re familiar with some of Orff’s music you’ll be reminded instantly). Another reference to how Between sounds may be found in Bobby Beausoleil’s Orkustra which also can be seen as sort of a synthesis between a symphonic orchestra and a psychedelic band.

But even though Between is about overcoming musical (and also social borders) the music is far from freak-out jams. Between is not about provoking utter chaos – Between is about reaching out for a universal harmony in the act of making music. It is – to a certain extend – a sonic utopia.

There are parts of the music that are improvised but most of it was written down before and is executed with modest but nonetheless masterful musicianship. The compositions take cues from the aforementioned Carl Orff, but also from Indian Classical Music, from the Spiritual Jazz and some of the Minimal Music that was around at that time and of course there’s a good portion of Psychedelia thrown in. Every second recorded sounds organic and you can bet that a lot of thought was put into it. And it is in fact a certain compositional rigour that prevents the music from becoming world-music-kitsch or pointless fusion-music: The music you hear is not just about the intended harmony – the music IS the realization of that harmony.

So, you don’t trust me, you think I’m exaggerating here? No problem, get some Between and trust your ears! Be it the wonderful title track or the following “Uroboros” or be it one of the other compositions: this is joyful and refreshing music. The instrumentation’s colourful and the general vibe is uplifting and –well, yeah – it’s just great to have some music around that is full of positive energy without being besmirched with esoteric blurb. It makes you feel good without having to leave your mind at home! A great achievement, if you ask me.

Photos about the album/band/track ;

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Album cover photo (front)

Image result for between and the waters opened

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Album  photo

Image result for between and the waters opened

Links about the album/band/track :

Between Band’s Page on Discogs

Between Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Between Band’s Page on Spotify

Between – “And The Waters Opened” Full Album Download Link on Juno Download

 

 

 

Hard Rock/Heavy Acid Rock/Proto Heavy Metal Australia 1970s (Tracks) Buffalo – “Freedom”

Hard Rock/Heavy Acid Rock/Proto Heavy Metal Australia 1970s (Tracks)

Buffalo (Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

“Freedom”(written by Tice/Baxter) A2 track included on the album “Volcanic Rock”

Released on Vertigo Records ( 6357 101) in August 1973

Line-up/Credits :

Dave Tice – lead vocals

Peter Wells – bass

John Baxter – guitar

Jimmy Economou – drums

 

Art Direction [Art Director] – Ian Brown

Engineer – Wahanui ”Wyn” Wynyard

Executive-Producer – Dermot Hoy

Illustration – J. Phillip Thomas

Photography By – Van Der Ley, Taylor

Producer – Spencer Lee

Volcanic Rock originally issued as Vertigo 6357 101 (August 1973)

1. SUNRISE (COME MY WAY) (Album version) (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
2. FREEDOM (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
3. TILL MY DEATH (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
4. THE PROPHET (Dave Tice/John Baxter)
5. INTRO: POUND OF FLESH (John Baxter/Peter Wells)
6. SHYLOCK (Dave Tice/John Baxter)

Lyrics :

“Freedom”
Your senses are returning,
you’ll soon be on your way
the old bridges burning,
it’s your new life’s first day
so lift up your head
and rise the banner high
the older is dead and a new flag will fly.
As you travel down the highway,
and you open up your mind
and move down each byway
understand the truths you find
and remember don’t deny
another who’s in need
and there’s reason still to cry,
until every man is free.
If you open up your eyes,
you’ll understand the things moan
and someday you’ll see why
men die for their dreams
travel on to freedom, travel on to freedom
travel on to freedom, travel on to freedom
Buffalo was an Australian rock band formed in August 1971 by founding mainstay Dave Tice on lead vocals (ex-Head). Fellow founders, also from Head, were Paul Balbi on drums, John Baxter on guitar, and Peter Wells on bass guitar; together with Alan Milano on lead vocals (ex-Mandala). Milano left after their debut album, Dead Forever… (June 1972), and Balbi was replaced on drums by Jimmy Economou. Their next two albums, Volcanic Rock (July 1973) and Only Want You For Your Body (June 1974), were also issued by Vertigo Records. After 1975 line-up changes resulted in a more commercial sound and the group disbanded in March 1977. Australian musicologist Ian McFarlane noted that there was “nothing subtle about Buffalo’s primal, heavyweight sound, but it was delivered with a great deal of conviction … combining the dense, occult riffing … with the progressive blues chops … the band certainly captured the arrogant disposition of the times in a bold and thunderous fashion”. Alongside Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs and Blackfeather, Buffalo pioneered Australia’s heavy metal, pub rock and alternative rock movements. Peter Wells died on 27 March 2006, aged 58.
Buffalo were an Australian hard rock band formed in August 1971 in Sydney by founding mainstay Dave Tice on co-lead vocals (ex-Head). Fellow founders, also from Brisbane’s blues-rockers Head, were Paul Balbi on drums, John Baxter on guitar, and Peter Wells on bass guitar. Tice and Wells had been together in groups since 1966 with The Odd Colours and Strange Brew before forming Head in 1968. Head had relocated to Sydney in mid-1970, its line-up changed with the acquisition of Alan Milano on co-lead vocals (ex-Mandala) and a new musical direction led to the name change. ‘Buffalo’ was chosen (according to legend, randomly off an Australian map) as being more marketable than ‘Head’, with its sexual and drug connotations. Alongside Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs and Blackfeather, Buffalo pioneered Australia’s heavy metal, pub rock and alternative rock movements. Buffalo were the first Australian act to be signed to Vertigo Records, however they remained largely an underground band.
In May 1972 they issued their debut single, “Suzie Sunshine”, which was written by Baxter and Peter Brett. It was followed in the next month by their debut album, Dead Forever…, which was produced by Spencer Lee. Both the single and album sold well with the album sales reaching 25,000. This was despite commercial radio virtually blacklisting the band – they received little airplay prior to the emergence of public radio stations (such as Triple J and 3RRR) in the mid-1970s. Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, described the album’s cover as “controversial” in that it depicted “a mournful, blood-soaked face peering through the eye socket of a skull” while buyers were advised to “Play this album LOUD”. After Dead Forever… appeared, Milano left, and Jimmy Economou replaced Balbi on drums. In mid-January 1973 Buffalo supported Black Sabbath at two Sydney shows on the Australian leg of the United Kingdom heavy rockers’ Volume IV Tour. According to Australian rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll, “The seeds for Australian heavy rock can be traced back to two important sources, Billy Thorpe’s Seventies Aztecs and Sydney band Buffalo, who came from the Black Sabbath/Uriah Heep school, and were signed to the same label as those groups (Vertigo) in Australia”.
The four-piece line-up of Baxter, Economou, Tice and Wells recorded their next two albums, Volcanic Rock (July 1973) and Only Want You For Your Body (June 1974), with Lee producing again. Allmusic’s Eduardo Rivadavia found their second album was “about as raw as heavy metal got in the early 1970s” and “all of its crudity was absolutely intentional”. He felt that their third album had the group “honing their songwriting into far more focused and compact heavy rock nuggets”. McFarlane stated that the band had “kept up the scorching, heavy metal mayhem, with Baxter’s savage guitar work and Tice’s demented vocals well to the fore” for both albums. Their use of controversial cover artwork continued: Volcanic Rock has a “graphic yet hilarious depiction of the female form as a menstruating volcano” while Only Want You For Your Body has an “obese, screaming woman shackled to a torture rack”. Some record chains refused to stock these albums. By mid-1974 Norm Roue (ex-Band of Light) had joined on slide guitar and later that year Baxter was fired from the group. McFarlane declared they had “lost one of its most valuable and distinctive assets and its spirit simply dwindled”.

During 1975 Karl Taylor joined on guitar and a change of music direction – towards more commercially oriented hard rock to attain greater radio airplay – followed with their next album, Mother’s Choice, appearing in March 1976. Steve Danno-Lorkin at I-94 Bar website felt it was “a big move forward with the times, more traditional in the song structuring and the lyric topics”; whereas a second reviewer, The Barman, described the same album, “starts with a bang … before slowing to a plod … the music drags rather than seizes the moment”. The line-up and direction changes continued with Roue and Taylor replaced by Chris Turner (ex-Drain) on guitar and, briefly, Chris Stead was their second guitarist. Wells left before the end of the year to form another hard rock group, Rose Tattoo. Wells had “decided to form the band that became Rose Tattoo, decided on their style of boogie and blues music, and their street look, united by their tattooed bodies”.

Buffalo disbanded in March 1977 when Tice travelled to London to join local rock group, The Count Bishops alongside his former band mate, Balbi. Late the previous year, Tice and latter day Buffalo members: Economou, Turner and Ross Sims on bass guitar, had recorded a final studio album, Average Rock ‘n’ Roller, which appeared in July 1977. McFarlane was disappointed with “Buffalo’s attempt at a more commercial sound, but [it] lacked the coherent direction of their predecessors”. Danno-Lorkin felt it was “very self indulgent” and “tracks on this don’t work quite so well as instrumentally they seems a bit lacking in direction or purpose”. The Barman noted that despite its title it was “well above average” and is “more a rock effort than the blues/boogie-fuelled Mother’s Choice”.

McFarlane noted that there was “nothing subtle about Buffalo’s primal, heavyweight sound, but it was delivered with a great deal of conviction … combining the dense, occult riffing … with the progressive blues chops … the band certainly captured the arrogant disposition of the times in a bold and thunderous fashion”.  Buffalo pre-dated other early Australian hard rockers: Coloured Balls (formed March 1972), AC/DC (late 1973), The Angels (1974, as The Keystone Angels), and Rose Tattoo (late 1976). Like many pioneering heavy metal acts, Buffalo incorporated strong influences of blues-rock and psychedelic rock. The band toured across Australia, at venues ranging from school dances in tiny halls to large outdoor concerts. Heavy Planet website considers Buffalo to anticipate doom metal and stoner rock.

By the end of 1972, Australia’s legendary progressive rock heavy weights Buffalo had established themselves as a prominent force on the local rock scene. The band’s debut album Dead forever… had sold well enough yet its true significance was rating as the very first Australian release on the prestigious Vertigo imprint which gained them valuable attention overseas.

The line-up had remained stable since the band’s inception in August 1971: Dave Tice (vocals), John Baxter (guitar), Pete Wells (bass), Alan Milano (vocals) and Paul Balbi (drums). Nevertheless, they were in a curious position when it came to their live appearances, with their local gigging schedule having dropped off considerably. As writer Richard Lyones reported in Sydney-based rock paper Sound Blast(December 1972): “The amazing thing is that, despite the tremendous sales of “Dead Forever”, despite their now international standing, despite the huge crowd they pulled to Paddo Town Hall earlier this year, promoters just aren’t booking them. Despite all that proof to the contrary, some promoters say they believe Buffalo isn’t profitable.”

This seems to have hung heavy on the band’s collective minds because they almost split up before the year was over. Tice had actually joined a new band called Mr. Madness being put together by four ex-members of Sydney-based psych-pop outfit Flake. The new band commenced gigging, but then the bosses at Buffalo’s record label, Phonogram/Vertigo, wanted them to support legendary British heavy metal demi-gods Black Sabbath at two Sydney concerts (Hordern Pavilion, 16th and 17th January 1973) as part of their second Australian tour (promoting the Volume 4 album). This was an opportunity too good to miss: Sabbath was one of the biggest bands of the day and indeed the local boys had often been compared favourably to the Brit metal masters. Tice remembers finishing the support slots to Sabbath, rushing offstage, jumping into a waiting car and heading across town to fulfill his singing role with Mr. Madness for three sets a night at Chequers disco. Naturally, his long-term allegiance lay with only one band: Buffalo.

Dave Tice remembers the Black Sabbath supports as “being really important shows… After I’d split, the record company came to us and said ‘fellas, you’ve got your album out, it’s sold well, we don’t want you to split up, Black Sabbath is coming and we want you as support band’. Dead forever… had been out for a while and we were on the same label as Black Sabbath of course, Vertigo. There was some discussion about whether we were gonna do it or not and we decided to do it and thankfully it was really good. I don’t remember seeing Black Sabbath because I had to leave straight away to play with Mr. Madness, but the reception we got was exceptional. I’ve had people come up to me in recent years and they say ‘oh I remember when you guys supported Black Sabbath and you blew them away’, y’know? Now, of course that is a matter of perspective but it’s nice to have people come up to you and say that.”

“Supporting Black Sabbath was a real highlight for me!” John Baxter declares. “We played to big crowds on both nights and we went over pretty well. Unfortunately we never got to meet Sabbath. On the first night I went up to their dressing room, knocked on the door but there was nobody around. I just stuck my head in and saw Tony Iommi’s guitar. I thought, ‘I’ll go and have a look at this’. So I walked up to it and I was feeling the strings and they were like elastic bands, they felt real soft and they were probably real light strings as well. And then a roadie walked in so I had to make a quick exit (laughs). That was it, nothing was said. So at least I touched Tony Iommi’s guitar for a split second. But it was a great gig for us. For a band that never got any radio airplay, to support Black Sabbath was fantastic.”

Revitalised Spirits

With the band’s spirits revitalised, their touring schedule immediately picked up. They scored another important support slot on the national package tour by British bands Slade, Lindisfarne, Status Quo and Caravan that did the outdoor concert rounds during February. Now down to a streamlined four-piece line-up of Tice, Baxter, Wells and new drummer Jimmy Economou, Buffalo ploughed ahead with more determination than ever and commenced work on their second album at United Sound Studios. Sound Blast reported that United Sound had recently imported new quadraphonic (four-channel) recording equipment and that the first to use the facilities would be none other than Buffalo! While working with the same producer/executive producer team of Spencer Lee and Dermot Hoy, this seemed the ideal opportunity to make an impact on record, yet the quadraphonic recordings never eventuated. What did eventuate, however, is one of the band’s greatest records and essentially the first real heavy psych metal album ever issued in Australia: the absolutely blazing Volcanic Rock (Vertigo 6357 101).

The importance of Volcanic Rock can never be overstated. This is the album that established the band’s reputation for dispensing uncompromising heavy psych rock of monumental proportions; this is the album that continues to enthrall aficionados of the genre the world over.

With the new album and its single, ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ b/w ‘Pound of Flesh’ (Philips 6037 035) out by August, the band was regularly headlining its own gigs around Sydney and interstate. They also picked up a major support gig (alongside the La De Das, Mighty Kong, Country Radio and Hush) to Sherbet and the Aztecs at the AMCO Supershow, Liverpool Speedway in December.

Reviews of the album were positive: “Buffalo is back. And that’s good news for those who like their rock steamin’ hot and raunchy… and Australian! (The album) thumps, it bumps and grinds gut solid from go to woe. The music howls and screams all around, and over guitar and bass riffs. It’s what you would expect from Buffalo, and that makes it easy to decide about the record… The production is good too. It’s going to be compared to Black Sabbath, but what the hell, Australia needs a band like that anyway!” (Sound Blast, August 1973).

Melbourne based Go-Set magazine never really warmed to Buffalo, describing the single ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ as: “Heavy, solid, fast-moving rock. But sadly it sounds Sunbury ’72 – and strong music doesn’t date. The vocalist has a powerful gnawing sort of voice, earthy and interesting. But the Steppenwolf influences are too obvious. Other side, Pound of Flesh, is musically more fulfilling. There’s the steady pounding rhythmic section and a guitar which does some nice intricate things in a lively pulsating sort of way.”

Irrespective of the views at the time, there’s no denying the album’s power to this day. Buffalo had already earned a reputation as macho progressive heavies with the release of Dead forever…, but it was Volcanic Rock that cemented the legend. With its full quota of scorching, molten heavy metal, Volcanic Rock sounds as sweet as a Mach truck driving through a china shop, with twice as much crunch to boot! Tracks like ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ with its frenzied intro and pounding beat, ‘Shylock’ and ‘Till My Death’ typified the band’s attitude and approach: raw, hard-nosed riff rock, as dirty, loud and vicious as hell. Epic tracks like ‘Freedom’ and ‘The Prophet’ saw the band members stretching out and flexing their musical muscle. These songs are essentially loose jams built up in the studio, but that doesn’t detract from the overall impact.

An interesting point to note is that for the original album program, ‘Pound of Flesh’ and ‘Shylock’ were sequenced together as one long, two-part track.

“Oh Shylock… pay me now!”

“This is a very subjective thing, but I think tracks like ‘Shylock’, ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’, ‘Freedom’ and ‘The Prophet’ are pretty much quintessential Buffalo tracks; they’re what I would really hang the band on, y’know?” Dave Tice explained. “They had that stream of consciousness thing going on, where we jammed them out in the studio; they are perfect examples of that. With ‘The Prophet’, John said to me recently, ‘I never realised what good lyrics you wrote Dave’, and quite religious in some ways. I guess John used to think that the lyrics, without sitting down and analysing them, were almost blasphemous and a little risqué. There is a bit of that but there’s a semi-religious content to them as well which is not so obvious. I think he discovered that himself in recent times. I don’t think he always took much notice of the lyrics whereas I used to labour over them quite a bit because I had to sing the damn things, y’know? Sometimes, with lyrics you write them down and then you’re appalled with having to deliver them. What might look good on paper might not come out so well when you sing them (laughs). But I could always make them work.”

“In my opinion ‘Shylock’ was our top live song, the song Buffalo we’re most recognised for,” Baxter confirms. “That was the song we played at every gig. That epitomised our style. I’d written the music at home and when I took it to the guys in rehearsals I said ‘look, I’ve got this idea, I don’t know, it’s not that good, do you wanna hear it?’ So Dave said ‘yeah, yeah, play it’. So I played it and they liked it. It was good that they did, otherwise I probably would have tossed it out. It became our most popular live song.”

Buffalo appeared at a concert held in Hyde Park for the Sydney Spring Festival 1973. Pop band Sherbet headlined the concert bill and Baxter remembers the day as wet and overcast. Nevertheless, Buffalo delivered an absolutely blazing rendition of the momentous ‘Shylock’ and all fans of the band will be intrigued to hear it after more than 30 years.

Baxter continues, warming to the memories: “The first album had a bit of variety on there; we were obviously still finding our way. It probably wasn’t the exact sound we were after but at the time we were happy with it. After that we went full on hard rock; no ballads. It was more my influences because I am a head banger. For Volcanic Rock we just decided to go full on, we recorded it live in the studio without any touch-ups. It was a very raw sound which is what we were aiming for. I’m not a ballad person myself. Being the main songwriter, I wrote all the music and got the songs going and then Dave would add his lyrics later. I’d bring ideas to rehearsal and then we’d jam on them and develop the songs from there. The music was up to me and that’s where we headed. The other guys were happy to head that way as well. I’m a heavy metal player; that’s what I do best.”

“The sound I developed came with the Gibson SG guitar and the Australian made Strauss Hurricane amplifier that I used; nothing else in between except occasional wah wah. It was a 200 watt RMS valve amp with two quad boxes. I used to love that amp! I’ve used Marshalls, Lennards, AC30s, all sorts of other amps and they never matched up to that Strauss amp. That amp’s gone now, I had to sell it. I also sold the SG quite a while ago. I was happy with my playing on the albums, there are little things I look back on now and think ‘it’s a pity that’s there’ or ‘I could have done a bit better there’. I think I did a pretty good job. From Volcanic Rock onwards, that four year period I was at my peak. Volcanic Rock and Only Want You for Your Body are the most representative albums when it comes to my guitar playing style.”

Wells indeed shares that opinion: “I think the best album is Volcanic Rock; we just seemed to capture a certain sound. It just seems to have survived the best. Generally speaking, just the style of playing and approach seems to make sense to me. I can’t remember that much about recording it; I’ve done a lot of recording since then so it’s very hard to remember specific recording sessions. ‘Shylock’ was always one of our gun numbers for sure. It always seemed to work when we played it live and people always liked it. If there’s any song from that era that people always focus on, that’s the one.”

Instrumentally the members of Buffalo were indeed at the top of their game on Volcanic Rock with Baxter’s savage guitar work and Wells’ throbbing, woody bass lines being real highlights, while Tice’s vocals never sounded so demented. Likewise, when drummer Economou really got wound up, there was basically no way of stopping him short of a sharp blow to the head. The album came with a fold-out illustrated lyric sheet, as well as featuring a garish and controversial gatefold cover illustration by J. Phillip Thomas: a graphic yet hilarious depiction of the female form as a menstruating volcano! To top it off, a fiery denizen of the volcano holds aloft a glowing, phallic shaped molten rock. Wonder what the feminists of the day had to say about that little lot!

“The Volcanic Rock cover, we thought it was pretty cool!” Tice laughs now. “I am surprised we got away with it at the time. From memory, there were two or three different designs put forward and the artwork that got used was the last one that the record company wanted to use (laughs). Only Want You for Your Body was the same too. The record company were shitting themselves what people might think. Ross Barlow was head of Phonogram at the time, and he was overseas when the Volcanic Rock artwork was getting put together and he sent a telex from New York or somewhere saying ‘watch what you guys put on the front cover’, y’know, and when he got back that’s what he was confronted with (laughs).”

“Our idea was to be controversial. Now those things aren’t considered controversial anymore although Volcanic Rock still has a certain amount of shock value especially to our feminist cousins. They still find it offensive and that’s good I reckon, because that’s what we were trying to do. You know, we wanted people to say ‘what the fuck is this; we’d better have a listen’. It’s the visual experience that can entice you; often you’d listen to an album because you saw something that appealed to you graphically on the cover. That’s always been very important. I continue to tell people ‘it’s no good making a great record and then sticking it in a package that no-one’s gonna take any notice of’, y’know? You might as well just hide it away. If you wanted people to take notice of you then you’d better damn well stand out!”

Baxter laughs too, but for a slightly different reason. “Volcanic Rock… That cover was a bit embarrassing to me. That demon on the volcano should have been holding a guitar above his head, I reckon, not what he was holding. I thought that was ridiculous (laughs). He should have been holding a flaming guitar. I would be much happier with that now. At the time we just thought it looked good. It did stand out; it was outlandish and caught people’s attention. That was the tactic we had to employ. No airplay, so we had to get people to listen to our music somehow. The record company was good; they didn’t push us too much. We had a very supportive and enthusiastic producer in Dermot Hoy. He saw our potential in the first place and he made the way clear for us to record our albums. With the covers, the company came up with the ideas and Ian Brown from the art department would say ‘okay, we’ll get the artwork done and we’ll okay it with you’. Usually we liked the artwork; I think the concepts were accepted straight away.”

“Some day sunrise coming my way…”

The album version of ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ was noteworthy, in that it’s a full minute longer than the single edit wherein the lead break mid-song had been excised for the sake of expected radio airplay. Nevertheless, it seems unlikely that anyone held out much hope for a Buffalo hit single! What’s more, the single version was in mono and noticeable for the fact that it lacked the dual lead guitar lines in the intro. Interestingly, most of the singles released by Phonogram on the blue and silver Philips label of the day were mono mixes. The mono single version of ‘Sunrise (Come My Way)’ appeared again as part of the rare Buffalo EP (Vertigo 6237 001) in 1974, alongside ‘Suzie Sunshine’, ‘Dead Forever’ and ‘Barbershop Rock’. We’ve included both the album and mono single versions here for comparison. As a reference point it’s worth noting that a tremendous live rendition of the song, recorded in October 1974 at Sydney’s Hordern Pavilion, was broadcast on the ABC-TV’s rock show GTK (Get To Know).

The 1973/74 period proved to be a busy and exciting time for Buffalo. They were on a roll, and following the release of Volcanic Rock they recorded their next album and continued to tour; however, the wind of change was howling and ructions towards the end of 1974 were set to destroy the band’s resolve and spirit.

By way of concluding this portion of the Buffalo story, Tice says “I still love those Buffalo albums. For a long time I didn’t listen to them. I couldn’t listen to them, I’d moved on. As you progress through your musical career there’s a time where you look back with disdain at what you did previously. You hope that you’re progressing, getting better at what you do. What I tended to hear when I did listen to the albums was the things I wasn’t happy with, the things that I thought were mistakes. I’d think, ‘I could have done that a bit better’ or ‘I didn’t hit the note quite right there’, y’know? You need a bit more distance to have perspective on these things. I’ve got a lot more perspective on it now; I can enjoy them again now. I can see them for what they were; I don’t need to justify them now. Also, you become more at ease with these kinds of things with the weight of other people’s opinions, you know what I’m saying?”

“I listen to the albums now and say ‘okay, we were young guys but the noises we made then are still being appreciated today’. And that continues to amaze me but I can see why now. Once upon a time I couldn’t see that. You’re too close to it, but you can’t divorce yourself completely from something that is really an expression of your personality at the time. If you have reason to want to put that behind you, it becomes a bit of an embarrassment. That might be a bit of a harsh word, but you know what I’m saying. You might think, ‘how could I have been so naïve?’ It’s got nothing to do with your technical ability as a singer or musician, but your perception of the world and how you relate to it does change drastically over time. I can look back and say ‘well it still stands up, I don’t have to be embarrassed by it, I think it’s fucking good work’, y’know? I hear myself singing and I think, ‘fuck Dave, you’re really not a bad singer at all’. There are some good songs there and thankfully I can see it within the context of which it was done.”

Wells is likewise down to earth when he states, “I’m not sure why the music still stands up. It’s a range of different things. I always ask people about that, younger people who have only been into the music for the last decade or so. I ask them, ‘well, why do you like the music’ and they say that it reminds them of a bunch of newer bands that have that same style. They just like it. Personally, I’ve got no idea why people still like the music. It’s a bit of a mystery to me really. There’s just a certain quality about the sound that appeals. It’s usually fans of that style of music and they’ve got all sorts of collectable records, they’re very enthusiastic about the music and they just go out of their way to collect it. They’re very keen on the music across the board.”

“I’ll be interested to see the reaction to these new CDs,” Wells concedes. “I don’t know if people will buy them. Will the old guys like them, will the young kids like them? I’m just interested to see who will buy them and who will relate to them. It’s all a bit of a mystery to me. Dave still works all the time, so do I, but the other guys who were in the band don’t play much now, so it’ll be interesting to see what everyone makes of the albums. There are the real record enthusiasts who will like the CDs, but the general record buying public couldn’t care less I’m sure.”

 

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Album cover photo (front)

buffalo volcanic rock 1

buffalo volcanic rock 2

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Album artwork

buffalo volcanic rock 3

Buffalo – “Freedom” Video file link on YouTube

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Full Album Audio file link on Spotify

Buffalo Band’s Page on Discogs

Buffalo – “Volcanic Rock” Full Album Download file link on Rockasteria Blog

Buffalo Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Buffalo Revisited Band’s Page on Facebook

 

 

Art/Instrumental/Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks) Rick Wakeman – “Catherine Howard”

Art/Instrumental/Progressive Rock U.K. 1970s (Tracks)

Rick Wakeman  (Perivale, London, U.K.)

Instrumental Rock

“Catherine Howard” (written by Rick Wakeman) A3 track included on the album “The Six Wives Of Henry VIII”

Released on A&M Records ( AMLH 64361) on 23rd January 1973

The Six Wives of Henry VIII is the first studio album by the English keyboardist Rick Wakeman, released in January 1973 on A&M Records. It is an instrumental progressive rock album with its concept based on his interpretations of the musical characteristics of the six wives of Henry VIII. After signing with A&M as a solo artist, Wakeman decided on the album’s concept during a tour of the United States as a member of the rock band Yes. As he read a book about the subject on his travels, melodies he had written the previous year came to him and were noted down. Musicians from Yes and from Strawbs, the group Wakeman was in prior to Yes, also play on the album.

The Six Wives of Henry VIII received mostly positive reviews from critics. It reached number 7 on the UK Albums Chart and number 30 on the Billboard 200 in the United States. It was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in 1975 for over 500,000 copies sold in the United States. In 2009, Wakeman performed the album in its entirety for the first time live at Hampton Court Palace as part of the 500th anniversary celebration of Henry’s accession to the throne. The tracks were rearranged with sections, including a track dedicated to Henry himself, that were left off the original album due to the limited time available on a single record. The album was reissued in 2015 with a quadraphonic sound mix and bonus tracks.

In August 1971, Rick Wakeman joined the progressive rock band Yes as a replacement to their original keyboardist Tony Kaye. Towards the end of the year, he signed a five-album deal as a solo artist with A&M Records. While touring the United States with Yes on their Fragile Tour promote Fragile (1971), Wakeman was informed by his manager Brian Lane that A&M co-founder and executive Jerry Moss wished to meet him at A&M Studios in Los Angeles. Moss wished for Wakeman to record a solo album and offered an advance of $12,500, around £4,000, to produce it which Wakeman accepted. As part of his signing on fee, Wakeman received a 1957 Cadillac limousine from A&M which he claimed was once owned by Clark Gable and had it shipped to England. Wakeman chose it after the label asked him what he would want as a present and remembered he had seen the car in the building’s parking lot.

During the Fragile Tour, Wakeman bought four books at an airport bookstall in Richmond, Virginia, including one about Henry VIII and his six wives titled The Private Life of Henry VIII (1964) by Scottish writer Nancy Brysson Morrison. As he read about Anne Boleyn on the subsequent flight to Chicago, a theme he recorded in November 1971 ran through his mind which he wrote on some hand drawn ledger lines and played during the sound check and the subsequent concert. Said Wakeman, “I had been searching for a style to write in and suddenly I found it in writing music about these six ladies…I would concentrate on one of the wives and then music just came into my head and I would write it down. Sometimes I was flying, other times I was on stage, or just in front of the piano at home … The six wives theme gave me the thread, the link, I needed to give me a reason for putting these pieces of music together.” He explains the album’s concept further in its liner notes: “The album is based around my interpretations of the musical characteristics of the wives of Henry VIII. Although the style may not always be in keeping with their individual history, it is my personal conception of their characters in relation to keyboard instruments.” Wakeman elaborated and wrote the music as if he was doing a surreal painting, “sketches of how I felt about them at the time”.

Not only did this album help pave the way for progressive rock, but it also introduced the unbridled energy and overall effectiveness of the synthesizer as a bona fide instrument. Six Wives gave Wakeman his chance to break away from the other instrumental complexities that made up Yes and allowed him to prove what a driving force the keyboard could truly be, especially in full album form. More than just synthesized wandering, Wakeman astoundingly conjures up a separate musical persona by way of an instrumental ode to each of Henry VIII’s wives through his dazzling use of the Mellotron, Moog, and Hammond C-3 organ. For example, Wakeman’s fiery runs and fortissimo thwarting of the synthesizer throughout “Anne Boleyn” is a tribute to her feisty temper and valiant courage that she maintained while standing up to her husband. With “Jane Seymour,” on the other hand, Wakeman’s playing is somewhat subdued and gentle, which coincides with her legendary meekness and frailty, as well as her willingness to cater to Henry VIII. Wakeman’s masterful use of his synthesizers is instrumentally stunning, as is his talent of magically shaping the notes to represent behavioral idiosyncrasies of his characters. Yes bassist Chris Squire lends a hand on “Catherine of Aragon,” while guitarist Steve Howe and drummer Bill Bruford appear on a few tracks as well, as does former Strawbs member Dave Cousins, playing the electric banjo. The Six Wives of Henry VIII unleashes the unyielding power of the keyboard as a dominant instrument, but also displays Wakeman at the beginning of an extremely resplendent career as a solo musician.

It says in the fine print of Rick Wakeman’s first solo album that the music is “based around [my] interpretations of the musical characteristics of the wives of Henry VIII.” The idea for the album came from the book of the same name, which Yes’ Wakeman purchased at a London airport. He writes that the music for each of Henry’s wives came flowing inside his head as he read about them. A bit apocryphal perhaps, but apparently Wakeman found what he was looking for — a theme through which he could expose his keyboard virtuosity. He overdubbed eight of them: Mini-Moog synthesizer, mellotron with brass and string effects, a Steinway Grand piano, another mellotron with voice effects, C-3 Hammond organ, RMI electric piano, Arp synthesizer and a Thomas Goff harpsichord.

Placing himself in the middle of these various keyboards, Wakeman created a synthesized orchestra. Along with a rhythm section often composed of Yes’ Chris Squire on bass, Steve Howe on guitar and the group’s recently acquired drummer Alan White, he used the electric piano to take the place of strings, the electric harpsichord to replace the sound of reeds, and the Arp to replace a contra bassoon.

With this album, Wakeman has made his bid for Keith Emerson’s place as the master of keyboard electronics. Though falling a little short in technique, he has a brilliant feel for tasteful impressionistic composition. For example, “Catherine Of Aragon,” at first sounds like ELP’s “Tarkus,” but evolves into a more melodic cut featuring some human choral work by Liza Strike, Barry St. John and Judy Powell.

The brightest spot on the album is “Catherine Howard,” which contains at least four time changes and some amazing interplay between mellotron, harpsichord, Moog and acoustic piano.

Henry VIII is an exceptionally interesting instrumental album. The production is superb, the mixing tasteful with hardly an uncomfortable studio effect. In fact, most of what we would normally think of as effects are the product of Wakeman’s own playing which is just fine.

Track Listing:

1. Catherine of Aragon (3:45)
2. Anne of Cleves (7:50)
3. Catherine Howard (6:36)
4. Jane Seymour (4:44)
5. Anne Boleyn (Incl. ‘The Day Thou Gavest Lord Hath Ended’) (6:31)
6. Catherine Parr (7:00)

Total Time: 36:36

Personnel:

– Rick Wakeman / Steinway grand piano, RMI electric piano, Hammond C3 organ, acoustic & electric harpsichord, Mini-Moog, ARP synthesizer, Mellotron 400D, Cripplegate St. Giles church organ (4), arrangements & production

With:
– Mike Egan / guitar (1,2,5,6)
– Steve Howe / guitar (1)
– Dave Lambert / guitar (3)
– David Cousins / electric banjo (3)
– Chris Squire / bass (1)
– Dave Winter / bass (2,6)
– Chas Cronk / bass (3)
– Les Hurdle / bass (1,5)
– Bill Bruford / drums (1,5)
– Alan White / drums (2,4,6)
– Barry de Souza / drums (3)
– Ray Cooper / percussion (1,5)
– Frank Ricotti / percussion (2,3,6)
– Judy Powell / chorus (1)
– Barry St.John / chorus (1)
– Liza Strike / chorus (1,5)
– Laura Lee / chorus (5)
– Sylvia McNeill / chorus (5)

Line-up/Credits :

Engineer [Assistant] – Pete Flanagan* (tracks: A2 to B1, B3)

Engineer, Mixed By – Paul Tregurtha (tracks: A2 to B1, B3)

Producer, Written-By, Arranged By – Rick Wakeman

Technician [Keyboards & Amplification Set Up By] – Claude Johnson Taylor, John Cleary, Michael Tait (2), Philip Hepple

 

Instruments:

Custom built Hammond C-3 Organ, RMI Electric Piano & Harpsichord, 2 x Mini-Moog Synthesizer, Mellotron 400-D (Brass/Strings/Flutes), Mellotron 400-D (Vocals/Sound Effects/Vibes), Steinway 9’ Grand Piano, Frequency Counter, Custom Mixer.

In addition to the above instruments a Thomas Goff Harpsichord and ARP Synthesizer were used. All sounds put through two Steoreo Leslies, Fender Duel Showman Amp & two JBL Cabinets. Also used a custom built Oscillator, Fuzz & Wahwah Pedal and Binson Echo Unit. The organ on ‘Jane Seymour’ was recorded at St. Giles, Cripplegate.

‘Katherine Of Aragon’ was engineered and mixed at Trident Studios, London. ‘Anne Boleyn’ was engineered at Morgan Studios, London, and mixed at Trident Studios. All the remaining tracks were engineered and mixed at Morgan Studios.

Hymn at the end of ‘Anne Boylen’ which is ‘The Day Thou Gavest Lord Hath Ended’.

Recorded between February and October, 1972. All songs published by Rondor Music.

This album is based around my interpretations of the musical characteristics of the wives of Henry VIII. Although the style may not always be in keeping with their individual history, it is my personal conception of their characters in relations to keyboard instruments. – Rick.

Rick Wakeman – “The Six Wives Of Henry VIII” Album cover photo (front)

rick wakeman the six wives of henry viii

Rick Wakeman – “Catherine Howard” Video file link on YouTube

Rick Wakeman – “The Six Wives Of Henry VIII” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page on Spotify

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page/Discography/Full Albums/Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page on Facebook

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page on Discogs

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page on RWCC

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Channel on YouTube

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Concert Setlists/Tour Dates on Setlist Fm

Rick Wakeman Artist’s Page

 

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock Spain 1970s Skorpis – “No Hay Tiempo Para Creer”

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock Spain 1970s

Skorpis (Madrid, Spain)

“No Hay Tiempo Para Creer” (written by Skorpis) A’ Side single released on GMA Records (G-1026) in 1973

Line-up/Credits :

JESUS DELGADO- Bass

LUIS RIVAYA – Drums

PEDRO LOZANO – Guitar

JAVIER HUIDOBRO Vocals, Guitar

CARLOS F. CÁRCAMO – Violin, Flute, Percussion

Skorpis – “No Hay Tiempo Para Creer” Single cover photo (front)

SKORPIS NO HAY TIEMPO PARA CREER (2)

Skorpis – “No Hay Tiempo Para Creer” Single photo 

SKORPIS NO HAY TIEMPO PARA CREER 1

Skorpis – No Hay Tiempo Para Creer” Video file link on YouTube

Skorpis – “No Hay Tiempo Para Creer” Audio file link on Spotify

Skorpis band’s page on Spotify

 

 

Folk/Progressive Rock Sweden 1970s (Tracks) Arbete Och Fritid – “Gånglåt efter Lejsme Per Larsson, Malung”

Folk/Progressive Rock Sweden 1970s (Tracks)

Arbete Och Fritid (Uppsala, Sweden)

Gånglåt efter Lejsme Per Larsson, Malung”  (Traditional) A1 track included on the album “Arbete Och Fritid” 

Cover Version of a traditional track

Released in 1973 on MNW (39P)

Line-up/Credits :

Tord Bengtsson Elbas – Piano, Keyboards, Violin, Harmonica

Torsten Eckerman Trumpet, Piano, Tambourine, Percussion, Keyboards

Ove Karlsson – Bass, Vocals, Cello

Roland Keijser – Clarinet, Flute, Piano, Keyboards, Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone,  Ratchet, Flute

Bosse Skoglund – Bell

Rolf Lundqvist Sang – Whistle

Arbete Och Fritid – “Arbete Och Fritid” Album cover photo (front)

ARBETE OCH FRITID 1973 (2)
Arbete Och Fritid – “Gånglåt efter Lejsme Per Larsson, Malung” Video file link oon YouTube

Arbete Och Fritid – “Gånglåt efter Lejsme per Larsson, Malung” Audio file link on Spotify

Arbete Och Fritid- Band’s page on Spotify