Six Feet Under – “What Would You Do?” (1969/1970)

 

Band : Six Feet Under (Formed in 1966 out of the ashes of the Marc 5 and Sonix, in Colonia, New Jersey, U.S.A.)

Country Of Origin : U.S.A.

Track : “What Would You Do?” (A3 track, studio recording)

Album : “In Retrospect 1969-’70″ (Compilation album, including studio/home recordings and bonus tracks)

Label : Arf! Arf! Records (AA-074)

Date/Year Of Recording/Release : Recorded in 1969-1970, released in 1998

Category/Music Genres : Garage/Psychedelic Rock, U.S.A., 1960s/1970s

Six Feet Under – “What Would You Do?” 

Video on YouTube

The song is included on the album “In Retrospect 1969-’70” (A3 track,  studio recording)

“In Retrospect 1969-’70” album (released in 1998)

Album cover photo (front and back)

Image result for six feet under in retrospect

Six Feet Under – “In Retrospect 1969-’70” Full Album Video on YouTube

Tracks

1 Inspiration in My Head – 2:28
2 Freedom – 4:07
3 What Would You Do? – 3:43
4 Baby I Want to Love You – 8:08
5 In Retrospect – 4:04
6 Fields – 3:04
7 Running Around in the Sun – 3:28
8 Black Movies – 3:20
9 Six Feet Under Theme – 2:46
10 Suzy Q – 6:18
11 City Blues – 5:12
12 In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida (D. Ingle) – 11:52
13 Basement Jam – 0:47
14 Sonix Commercial – 0:58
15 Inspiration in My Head – 2:51
16 Freedom – 4:30
17 What Would You Do? – 5:53
18 Fields – 3:05
19 Boogie Man Bash – 0:44

Six Feet Under

Line-up 

Jay Crystal –  Drums
Nanette DeLaune – Vocals
Jerry Dobb – Keyboards, Vocals
Scott Julian – Guitar
Hector Torres – Drums
Duane Ulgherait  – Bass
Richie – Drums (only on track #9)

Information about the album/band

“This Colonia, NJ ensemble captured the changing times and sociological upheaval of the pre-Woodstock Nation. Like the Jefferson Airplane, Neighb’rhood Childr’n and The United States Of America, Six Feet Under was blessed with a dynamic diva who soared amidst searing fuzz leads, swirling organ chords, and gifted songwriting with prophetic lyrics”. (from their CD-release “In Retrospect 1969-’70”).

“As Bar Mitzvah presents, Jerry Dobb receives an Acetone electronic organ with Kalamazoo Amplifier and Scott Julian receives an Epiphone electric guitar and amp. The friends decide to form a band in the archetypal New York City suburb of Colonia, New Jersey. First band is named the Marc 5 (for no reason that I can now remember – no one named Marc in the band). The band consists of Jerry and Scott, Bob Briendel on bass (he had no idea how to play. Scott showed him where to put his fingers), Phil Mazuski on drums and the only real musician, Joe “Musky” Muscolino on saxophone.
The band had a repertoire of about 10 songs, including “Summertime,” “Tequila” and “The Batman Theme.” Playing a private pool party and someone requested “Moon River.” Musky knew it, so we faked it behind him. It was pretty awful, but the guests were too drunk to care and actually gave us an extra tip for playing it! The thirteen year olds in the band hook up with a seemingly much older, 17 year old singer named Pete (don’t remember his last name) and change the name of the band to the Sonix. Pete is an R&B enthusiast and the song list changes to include “I Got You,” “Mustang Sally” and other soul songs. Pete performs James Brown style with spins, splits and yelps.
The hand uniform is pointy-toed black shoes, black pants, pink Italian high-roll collar shirts and burgundy button front sweaters. The band decides that they’d like to follow a more hip and hippy style of music. Pete departs and the group reforms as Six Feet Under. Phil is replaced by Ritchie on drums. Bob, who never really took to music, is replaced by Duanc Ulghcrait on bass. Joe leaves for an established soul band. A girl singer (name unknown) briefly comes and goes. Ritchie, while an excellent drummer, proves to be volatile and is replaced by Hector “Tico” Torres from Sayerville N.J. Where did the name Six Feet Under come from? Well after the Sonix, the hand wanted a new hipper name.
The first thing decided was that the name shouldn’t begin with “The.” After some brainstorming, someone mentioned that the British band Ten Years After didn’t start with “The” and was kind of cool. So we started coming up with phrases that fit that pattern; a number, a noun, and an adverb. We also wanted a name that was kind of dark and slightly threatening, like the Grateful Dead. Ultimately someone came up with Six Feet Under, and we immediately realized that it was the perfect moniker. Later, when Nannette joined the band the sound softened a bit, but the name stuck until the end.
When the dust settles it’s Jerry on organ and vocals, Scott on guitar, Duane on bass and Tico on drums. Tico plays a drum set that belonged to his dad, circa the mid-1940s. The bass drum was oversized and the tom-toms were nailed onto the bass. A friend of Tico’s paints a beautiful oil painting of a woman’s head floating above a grave with ghostly hands reaching up, trying to retrieve it. This is cut out and inserted into the front of the bass drum. A simplified line drawing of the painting is used as a promotional hand-out.
The band plays at least one night most weekends and improves. Gigs include dances, Rutger’s University fraternity parties, battle of the band competitions and local festivals in and around Northern New Jersey. The songs now include a lot of Doors material, Cream, Hendrix, and the signature song, a relatively faithful rendition of the complete “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” The First original songs appear, including “The Six Feet Under Theme” and “Karen.” Around this time the opportunity to record appears.
Fifteen year old Nanette DeLaune joins the band as “chick singer” a la Grace Slick. Jay Crystal begins as drummer. While preparing to record the band continues to play gigs, many times two a weekend. The material now includes songs by the Jefferson Airplane, Rolling Stones, Santana, Ten Years After and Blind Faith. Show stoppers include a rousing version of “Soul Sacrifice” and a 15 minute set of songs from the Who’s “Tommy.” Original material is written by Jerry and practised.
The band records at the Scepter Studios. Jerry uses a Hammond B-3 with Leslie tone cabinet for the first time. “Inspiration In My Head” is “released.” The band is angry because the extended instrumental break at the end of the song is edited out. Friends and relatives convince a local record shop to order the single and buy a few dozen copies. A local radio station plays it once on the air. The band listens in a car and can’t believe that they’re on the radio. Nothing else happens. The band goes back to the studio to record more songs.
By late fall of 1970 the band decides to split up. Jerry, Scott and Duane head to college. Jerry assembles an ad-hoc band and records some solo songs. These are never released. Nanette does some further recording also, but nothing comes of it. Jerry studies film-making at college and ultimately becomes a corporate video manager. Scott ends up as a chef in a prestigious hotel. Duane becomes a candy salesman. Musky lands in Utah where he plays and books local bands. Don’t know what became of Nanette, Jay, Bob, Phil, Ritchie, or Pete. But Hector “Tico” Torres, the guy who wasn’t good enough to record, hooked up with a younger boy from Sayerville named Jon Bon Jovi and the rest, as they say”…by Jerry Dobb, (source : “Rockasteria” Blog).
External Links

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Acid, Garage, Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s The Open Mind – “Magic Potion”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Category/Music Genres :

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Acid/Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s

Band :

The Open Mind (London, Greater London, U.K.)

British rock band from London, late 1960s, originally called The Apaches, later renamed to The Drag Set before the were called The Open Mind.
Mike Brancaccio (guitar, vocals) Timothy du Feu (bass) Phil Fox (drums) Terry Schindler aka Terry Martin (guitar, vocals)

The Open Mind Band’s photo 

Open Mind_band

Related Artists :

Armada

Also known as :

The Apaches, The Drag Set

Track :

“Magic Potion” (written by  Mike “Bran” Brancaccio), (A’ Side single) released on Philips Records (BF 1805) in 1969

Open Mind_label

The track is also included on the reissue edition of the album “Open Mind” (originally released on Philips Records SBL 7893, in 1969), released on Antar Records (ANTAR 2), released in 1986

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Original edition on Philips Records (sbl 7893), album’s cover photo (front)

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Reissue edition on Antar Records,  album’s cover photo (front)

THE OPEN MIND 1 (2)

The Open Mind _ “The Open Mind” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

B’ Side single “Cast A Spell”

The Open Mind – “Cast A Spell” (B’ Side Single) Track’s Video on YouTube

Line-up :

Mike Brancaccio – Guitar, Vocals
Timothy De Feu – Bass
Phil Fox – Drums
Terry Martin – Guitar, Vocals
Jon Anderson briefly sang in the band but left before the recordings to form Yes.

Lyrics :

Take a drink from my magic potion
Do you wanna really feel fine?
What’s if?
And you will see things you never saw before
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Hold on my son, there’s a different world
Appearing in front of my eye
If you don’t wanna try this potion
Leave it all for me
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Take a drink from my magic potion
Tell me, do you still feel fine?
What’s if?
And you will see things you never saw before
How do you feel?
I feel fine
How do you feel?
Oh, I feel fine
Gone by my soul, I feel fine
Songwriters: Michael Brancaccio
Information related to the track :
“Pop Matters”
“Magic Potion” is psychedelia purged of all whimsy and wonder and utopian overtones; instead is a feeling of churning menace — underscored by apocalyptic hoof-beat drumming, quasi-raga licks, and droning open-string riffs played through thick distortion and a truly toxic wah-wah — that makes it hard to believe when singer Terry Martin bellows, “Upon my soul, I feel fine”. You get a sense of the incipient danger in “seeing things you never saw before”: you get the feeling these would not be cellophane flowers and marmalade skies, but something chthonic and unspeakable. On the whole, the song is unbelievably heavy without being ponderous, and seems like a prescient blueprint for late 1990s stoner rock.
Information related to the band :
“Wikiwand”

The Open Mind was an English psychedelic rock band formed in London, and active in the 1960s and 1970s.

Overview

The band was formed in 1963 by four musicians from Putney, South West London. Initially named The Apaches formed by Tim du Feu, Mike Brancaccio and Philip Fox and their friend Ray Nye. Nye left in 1965 and another friend, Terry Schindler, joined instead. The band became The Drag Set, who released a little-known single in February 1967, “Day and Night” / “Get Out of My Way”. Shortly thereafter, they changed their name to The Open Mind and in July 1969 released a self-titled LP which has since become a highly sought-after collectible. The band, however, is best known for its druggy August 1969 single, “Magic Potion”, which did not appear on the album.

The Open Mind disbanded in 1973; its members wanted to move into jazz-influenced music, but The Open Mind was too well known as a psychedelic band. The band members (minus Phil Fox) went on to form Armada, which lasted about three years but did not release any recorded material.

Despite their paucity of recorded material, The Open Mind have proven to be influential in the psychedelic rock genre, their single “Magic Potion” having been covered by bands such as The Seers, Sun Dial and The Damned.

Band members

  • Mike Bran, a.k.a. Mike Brancaccio – lead guitar, vocals, piano (born 17 April 1946, Rome, Italy)
  • Timothy du Feu – bass guitar (born 31 May 1944, Malvern, Worcestershire, England)
  • Philip Fox – drums (born 26 August 1946, Westminster, South West London)
  • Ray Nye – guitar, vocals
  • Terry Martin, a.k.a. Terry Schindler – guitar, vocals (born 26 August 1945, Holborn, West Central London)

Discography

Singles

  • “Horses and Chariots” b/w “Before My Time” (Philips BF 1790) May, 1969
  • “Magic Potion” b/w “Cast a Spell” (Philips BF 1805) August, 1969
The Drag Set
  • “Day and Night” b/w “Get Out of My Way” 7″ single (Go AJ 11405) May, 1967

Album

  • The Open Mind LP (Philips 7893) (July 1969)

The Open Mind was reissued on CD on the Acme Records and Second Battle labels. The two non-LP songs from the single are included as bonus tracks.

“Rockasteria”
he band was formed in the mid 1960s by four musicians from Putney, South London.Initially named The Drag Set, they released a little-known single in February 1967, “Day and Night”/”Get Out of My Way”. Shortly thereafter, they changed their name to The Open Mind and in July 1969 released a self-titled LP which has since become a highly sought-after collectible.
The Open Mind produced one of the finest UK psychedelic albums, which is excellent throughout and hardly contains a bad track. The music is characterised by some particularly strong psychedelic guitar work and good vocals. It’s impossible really to pull-out particular tracks as highlights – they’re almost all equally good.
Fortunately this album was re-released and this has made this classic piece of 60’s Freakbeat much more accessible to collectors of 60’s psychedelia. The reissue includes their second rare 45 release, which unlike the first wasn’t taken from the album and is superb. A blistering 45 with tasty psychedelic fuzz guitar work. The band, however, is best known for its druggy August 1969 single, “Magic Potion”, which did not appear on the album.
“Cosmic Mind At Play”

This outfit from Putney in South London had previously been known as The Drag Set, rubbing shoulders with The Soft Machine and a newly-arrived-in-the-UK Jimi Hendrix, and coming to the attention of producer Joe Meek and recording a couple of songs with him just days before he took his own life. They released a fine mod/freakbeat single on the CBS subsidiary Go in March 1967, ‘Day and Night / Get Out Of My Way’.

Changing name to The Open Mind at the end of 1967, the group played hip London venues such as The Electric Garden, UFO and Happening 44, and gained a residency at The Marquee where they were sometimes fronted by future Yes man Jon Anderson, who at the time went by the name Hans Christian.

Boxing impresario Benny Huntsman landed the band a deal with Philips on the condition that his son Roger became their manager (though in effect it was Benny who ran the show), and their excellent self-titled album on that label was recorded in 1968, though not released until July 1969. It included both sides of their debut single ‘Horses and Chariots / Before My Time’ from May of that year, as well as a revamped version of the a-side of The Drag Set 45 with the new title ‘Girl I’m So Alone’. The group appeared in Philip’s New Faces of 1969 promotional film alongside the likes of The Barrier, Ambrose Slade and Procession, miming ‘Horses and Chariots’.

The Open Mind’s second single, released in August 1969, consisted of two new tracks and is perhaps the pinnacle of their recorded output. The a-side ‘Magic Potion’ is a sublime example of heavy psychedelia with its fuzzy rhythm guitar, snaking lead guitar lines, and druggy lyrics. The arrival of the wah-wah in the break is perfectly judged, and there is some truly thunderous drumming throughout, especially in the outro.

Flip side ‘Cast a Spell’ is a little less high voltage but retains the fuzzy guitars and perhaps is even more catchy with its “It’s all in the mind” refrain. This is a fearsome double sider. A jewel in the crown of Brit-psych you might say!

When Benny Huntsman died of a heart attack the band ended up being financed by the Richardson family, part of London’s criminal underworld. Promoters were loathe to book them when they learned of this and with gigs petering out and psychedelia on the wane The Open Mind broke up.

Reissues: Both sides of the 45 are on the essential Rubble Volume 1 (what an eye opener that was for me into the delightful world of British psychedelia and freakbeat), and also on the vinyl British Psychedelic Trip Volume 3 (part of another great compilation series, though with a fair amount of overlap with the Rubbles).

Photos related to the album/track :

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Single photo (A’ Side)

THE OPEN MIND MAGIC POTION 1 (2)

Photos related to the band :

Tim Dufeu

The Drag Set

Related image

Image result for open mind band

Links related to the album/track :

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion”Track’s Video on “YouTube”

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Back In Purple” Blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on “Willie Said” blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album Download Link on Rock Archeologia” blog

The Open Mind – “The Open Mind” Full Album’s Review on “Pop Matters”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” Information related to the track on “Magic Potion Net”

The Open Mind – “Magic Potion” on “45cat”

Links related to the band :

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Discogs”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

The Open Mind Interview with Timothy Dufeu n “It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Open Mind Band’s Page on “Time Machine Music” Website

The Open Mind Information related to the band on “Eric Brightwell” Blog

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change”

John Mayall – “The Laws Must Change” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Live Performances Blues Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

John Mayall (Macclesfield, Cheshire, U.K.)

“Track”

“The Laws Must Change” (written by John Mayall) A1 track (opening track) included on the live album “Turning Point”

Album :

“Turning Point”  released on Polydor Records (583571) in October 1969

The Turning Point is a live album by John Mayall, featuring British blues music recorded at a concert at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East on 12 July 1969.

Originally released with a lyric insert.

The album was produced by John Mayall, who also designed the packaging and was the album’s art director. The recording engineer was Eddie Kramer, who had engineered Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin, among others.

Line-up/Credits :

Line-up :

John Almond – flute, saxophone, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, mouth percussion

Jon Mark – acoustic guitar

John Mayall – guitar, harmonica, keyboards, tambourine, vocals, slide guitar, mouth percussion

Steve Thompson – bass guitar

The performers on the album were Mayall on vocals, harmonica, a slide and a Fender Telecaster guitar, a tambourine, and mouth percussion, Jon Mark on acoustic guitar, Steve Thompson on bass, and Johnny Almond on tenor and alto saxophones, flutes, and mouth percussion. All the songs on the album were written or co-written by John Mayall. Thompson co-wrote CaliforniaThoughts About Roxanne and Don’t Waste My Time.Another track, “I’m Gonna Fight For You, J.B.,” is a tribute to the American blues guitarist J. B. Lenoir who died in 1967 and who had a deep influence on Mayall (this was Mayall’s second such tribute to the musician; “The Death of J.B. Lenoir” appeared on his earlier Crusade album). Two concerts took place, on 11 and 12 July. All tracks are from the second gig.

Credits :

Bob Gordon – photography

Suha Gur – mastering

Eddie Kramer – engineer, audio engineer

Bill Levenson – reissue producer

John Mayall – liner notes, artwork, art direction, design, photography, audio production, telecaster

Monique McGuffin – production coordination

Neil Slaven – liner notes

Tapani Tapanainen – photography

Larry La Fond – photography

Chris Welch – liner notes

Barry Wentzell – photography

Zill – photography

Companies : 

Manufactured By – Polydor Records Ltd.

Phonographic Copyright (p) – Polydor Ltd.

Made By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Printed By – MacNeill Press Ltd.

Published By – St. George Music

Recorded At – Fillmore East

Lacquer Cut At – Phonodisc Ltd.

Label: Made in England, St. George Music, ® 1969

Track-list :

01. The Laws Must Change – 7:21
02. Saw Mill Gulch Road – 4:39
03. I’m Gonna Fight For You J.B. – 5:27
04. So Hard To Share – 7:05
05. California – 9:30
06. Thoughts About Roxanne  – 8:20
07. Room To Move – 5:03

Bonus tracks (2001 reissue) :

  1. “Sleeping By Her Side” – 5.10
  2. “Don’t Waste My Time” (Mayall, Thompson) – 4.54
  3. “Can’t Sleep This Night” – 6.19

JOHN MAYALL TRACKLIST 1 (2)

Lyrics :

The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
The time must surely come
For the laws to fit the times
But while the law is standing
You gotta open up your minds
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
It seems to be the fashion
To say you’re right and they are wrong
But you gotta see both sides
You’ll find yourself in jail ‘fore long
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they’re only doin’ a gig
You’re screamin’ at policemen
But they are only doin’ a gig
Gotta try and take the time
To figure out how the issue got that big
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Lenny Bruce was trying to tell you
Many things before he died
Don’t throw rocks at policemen
But get the knots of law untied
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
Every time you’re holdin’
You are guilty of a crime
The laws must change one day
But it’s goin’ to take some time
Songwriters: John Mayall
Information related to the album/artist/track :
“All Music”
As the elder statesman of British blues, it is John Mayall’s lot to be more renowned as a bandleader and mentor than as a performer in his own right. Throughout the ’60s, his band the Bluesbreakers acted as a finishing school for the leading British blues-rock musicians of the era. Guitarists Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor joined his band in a remarkable succession in the mid-’60s, honing their chops with Mayall before going on to join Cream, Fleetwood Mac, and the Rolling Stones, respectively. John McVie and Mick Fleetwood, Jack Bruce, Aynsley Dunbar, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Andy Fraser (of Free), John Almond, and Jon Mark also played and recorded with Mayall for varying lengths of times in the ’60s.

Mayall’s personnel has tended to overshadow his own considerable abilities. The multi-instrumentalist was adept in bringing out the best in his younger charges (Mayall was in his thirties by the time the Bluesbreakers began to make a name for themselves). Doing his best to provide a context in which they could play Chicago-style electric blues, Mayall was never complacent, writing most of his own material revamping his lineup with unnerving regularity, and constantly experimenting and stretching with the basic blues form on groundbreaking recordings such as 1967’s The Blues Alone, on which he played all instruments save for percussion — provided by Keef Hartley — and 1969’s best-selling The Turning Point, a stellar, drum-less unplugged helping of acoustic blues that netted him his biggest hit, the single “Room to Move.” Likewise, 1972’s Jazz Blues Fusion moved the other direction, as it featured Mayall in the company of trumpeter Blue Mitchell, saxophonist Clifford Solomon, guitarist Freddy Robinson, and bassist Larry Taylor. Mayall’s output has been prolific. He has introduced dozens of instrumentalists to the music-listening public including guitarists Coco Montoya and Harvey Mandel, and violinist Don “Sugarcane” Harris. When Clapton joined the Bluesbreakers in 1965, Mayall had already been recording for a year, and performing professionally long before that. Originally based in Manchester, Mayall moved to London in 1963 on the advice of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, who thought a living could be made playing the blues in the bigger city. Tracing a path through his various lineups of the ’60s is a daunting task. At least 15 different editions of the Bluesbreakers were in existence from January 1963 through mid-1970. Some notable musicians (like guitarist Davy Graham, Mick Fleetwood, and Jack Bruce) passed through for little more than a cup of coffee; Mayall’s longest-running employee, bassist John McVie, lasted about four years. The Bluesbreakers, like Fairport Convention or the Fall, were more a concept than an ongoing core. Mayall, too, had the reputation of being a difficult and demanding employer, willing to give musicians their walking papers as his music evolved, although he also imparted invaluable schooling to them while the associations lasted.Mayall recorded his debut single in early 1964; he made his first album, a live affair, near the end of the year. At this point the Bluesbreakers had a more pronounced R&B influence than would be exhibited on their most famous recordings, somewhat in the mold of younger combos like the Animals and Rolling Stones, but the Bluesbreakers would take a turn for the purer with the recruitment of Eric Clapton in the spring of 1965. Clapton had left the Yardbirds in order to play straight blues, and the Bluesbreakers allowed him that freedom (or stuck to well-defined restrictions, depending upon your viewpoint). Clapton began to inspire reverent acclaim as one of Britain’s top virtuosos, as reflected in the famous “Clapton is God” graffiti that appeared in London in the mid-’60s.

In professional terms, though, 1965 wasn’t the best of times for the group, which had been dropped by Decca. Clapton even left the group for a few months for an odd trip to Greece, leaving Mayall to straggle on with various fill-ins, including Peter Green. Clapton did return in late 1965, around the time an excellent blues-rock single, “I’m Your Witchdoctor” (with searing sustain-laden guitar riffs), was issued on Immediate. By early 1966, the band was back on Decca, and recorded its landmark Bluesbreakers LP. This was the album that, with its clean, loud, authoritative licks, firmly established Clapton as a guitar hero, on both reverent covers of tunes by the likes of Otis Rush and Freddie King and decent originals by Mayall himself. The record was also an unexpected commercial success, making the Top Ten in Britain. From that point on, in fact, Mayall became one of the first rock musicians to depend primarily upon the LP market; he recorded plenty of singles throughout the ’60s, but none of them came close to becoming a hit.

Clapton left the Bluesbreakers in mid-1966 to form Cream with Jack Bruce, who had played with Mayall briefly in late 1965. Mayall turned quickly to Peter Green, who managed the difficult feat of stepping into Clapton’s shoes and gaining respect as a player of roughly equal imagination and virtuosity, although his style was quite distinctly his own. Green recorded one LP with Mayall, A Hard Road, and several singles, sometimes writing material and taking some respectable lead vocals. Green’s talents, like those of Clapton, were too large to be confined by sideman status, and in mid-1967 he left to form a successful band of his own, Fleetwood Mac.

Mayall then enlisted 19-year-old Mick Taylor; remarkably, despite the consecutive departures of two star guitarists, Mayall maintained a high level of popularity. The late ’60s were also a time of considerable experimentation for the Bluesbreakers, who moved into a form of blues-jazz-rock fusion with the addition of a horn section, and then retreated into mellower, acoustic-oriented music. Mick Taylor, the last of the famous triumvirate of Mayall-bred guitar heroes, left in mid-1969 to join the Rolling Stones. Yet in a way Mayall was thriving more than ever, as the U.S. market, which had been barely aware of him in the Clapton era, was beginning to open up for his music. In fact, at the end of the ’60s, Mayall moved to Los Angeles. Released in 1969, The Turning Point, a live, all-acoustic affair, was a commercial and artistic high point.

In America at least, Mayall continued to be pretty popular in the early ’70s. His band was as unstable as ever; at various points some American musicians flitted in and out of the Bluesbreakers, including Harvey Mandel, Canned Heatbassist Larry Taylor, and Don “Sugarcane” Harris. Although he’s released numerous albums since, and remains a prodigiously busy and reasonably popular live act, his post-1970 output generally hasn’t matched the quality of his ’60s work. Following collaborations with an unholy number of guest celebrities, in the early ’80s he re-teamed with a couple of his more renowned vets, John McVie and Mick Taylor, for a tour, which was chronicled by Great American Music’s Blues Express, released in 2010. The ’60s albums are what you want, though over the past decades, there’s little doubt that Mayall has done a great deal to popularize the blues all over the globe. Continuing to record and tour into his eighties, Mayall released A Special Life, recorded at Entourage Studios in North Hollywood and featuring a guest spot by singer and accordion player C.J. Chenier, in 2014. The album was universally celebrated as one of his best.

A live archival recording of the Green, McVie, Fleetwood-era Bluesbreakers was released in April as Live in 1967. Meanwhile, the bandleader, his co-producer Eric Corne, and his seven-year old group — Rocky Athas, guitar; Greg Rzab, bass; Jay Davenport, drums — were in the studio. They emerged with Find a Way to Care, a set that showcased Mayall’s highly underrated keyboard playing on a set of originals and vintage covers including Percy Mayfield’s “The River’s Invitation.” The album was released in the late summer of 2015. Talk About That, Mayall’s second album for Forty Below, arrived in late 2017.

In the spring of 2018, at the age of 85, Mayall had to cancel a U.S. tour due to a nasty bout with pneumonia. That summer, sufficiently recovered, he hit the recording studio and emerged with the full-length Nobody Told Me in the late fall. Its first single, “Distant Lonesome Train,” was co-written with Joe Bonamassa (who also played guitar on it and another track). Other guests included Steve Van Zandt, Todd Rundgren, Alex Lifeson, Larry McCray, and Carolyn Wonderland. Mayall, ever the road warrior, embarked on a world tour after the album’s release that continued into 2019.

Photos related to the album/track :

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album cover photo (front)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album photo (A’ Side)

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo

John Mayall – “Turning Point” Album Artwork photo 

Photos related to the artist :

Image result for JOHN MAYALL

Image result for JOHN MAYALL 1969

Image result for JOHN MAYALL

Related image

JOHN MAYALL 2 (2)

Related image

JOHN MAYALL 1 (2)

John Mayall Recording Saturday Cub at the BBC Theater 1969, Mini Poster

Image result for JOHN MAYALL 1969

Links related to the album/track :

Links related to the artist :

Hard Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Odyssey – “Angel Dust”

Odyssey – “Angel Dust” Video on YouTube

Category :

Hard Rock/Heavy Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks)

Band :

Odyssey (Brentwood, New York, U.S.A.)

Track :

“Angel Dust” (written by Lous Yovino, Vincent Eugene Kusy) A1 (opening track) included on the album “Setting Forth”, released on Organic Records (ORG 1) in 1969

Album :

The ultra-rare original one, pressed in less than 100 copies
Promotional copy, white cover, label is marked “not for sale”

Recorded at A-1 Studios, New York City.

Line-up/Credits :

Louis Yovino (vocals)
Dennis Pennaga (guitar)
Ray Lesch (bass)
John Willems (percussion)
Vincent E. Kusy (keyboards)

Drums – Jay Sharkey

Engineer [Recording Engineer] – Red Beard

Executive Producer – Joe Carlton

Guitar – Fred Callan (2)

Liner Notes – Vincent Eugene Kusy

Lyrics By – Louis (tracks: 1 to 3, 5, 6, 8 to 10)

Mixed By – Kenny, Vincent

Music By – Janis Ian (tracks: 7), Michael Tschudin (tracks: 4), Vincent (tracks: 1 to 3, 5, 6, 8 to 10)

Producer – Ken Stella

Track List :
1 Angel Dust 5:43
2 Sally 4:34
3 Church Yard 3:00
4 You’re Not There 3:44
5 Got to Feel It 3:17
6 Tied by a Rope 4:24
7 Society’s Child 5:02
8 Denky’s Boogie 4:43
9 St. Elmo’s Fire 3:04
10 Come Back 3:29
Information about the album/band :

ODYSSEY “Setting Forth”:

Once upon a time, when the music business was more music than business (but only just), there was a lean, mean, and super tight band who created a quintessential dose of New York sixties psychedelia: one perfect album, loaded with heavy swirling organ, ferocious fuzz guitar, and powerhouse vocals. That band was Odyssey.

Their album, “Setting Forth,” did not take them from support slots in their native Long Island to the major label heights of other local bands like Vanilla Fudge. But it is that same Odyssey “Setting Forth” album that is one of the greatest guitar-heavy psych records in the world, and as a result one of the most sought after (and expensive) psychedelic rarities ever pressed on wax.

This is truly one of the pinnacles of underground psychedelic music, recorded in 1969, released in an edition of fewer than 100 copies, and impossible to find as it only came in a plain white cardboard sleeve; an incredible, musically accomplished, hard rocking album of originals that jumps right out of the speakers and grabs you, from it’s opening In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida-esque riffs right to the grooving end.

Photos :

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  cover photo (front) Timothy’s Brain Records (TB-103), Reissue Edition, 1995

Image result for odyssey setting forth organic records

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  photo (A’ Side), promo, original edition of 100 copies

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  photo (promo, original edition of 100 copies)

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  artwork, Lion Productions (LION-LP 102), Reissue Edition, 2005

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  cover photo (front), Lion Productions (LION-LP 102), Reissue Edition, 2005

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Album  cover photo (front), Trip Records (T-1000) , Reissue Edition, 1990

Odyssey, Band’s Photos

Image result for odyssey setting forth

Links about the album/band/track :

Odyssey – “Angel Dust” Video file link on YouTube

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Odyssey Band’s Page on Discogs

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Page on Bandcamp (Repsycled Label)

Odyssey Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Band’s Full Album Download Link on Bordel Do Rock Blog

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Band’s Full Album Download Link on Heavy 70’s Blog

Odyssey Band’s Page on Light In The Attic Records

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Band’s Full Album Download Link on Rock Archeologia 60-70 Blog

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Full Album Download Link on Back In Purple Blog

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Band’s Full Album Download Link on Venenos Do Rock Blog

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Band’s Full Album on Apple Music

Odyssey Band’s Interview on It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine Blog

Odyssey – “Setting Forth” Full Album on Deezer

Odyssey Band’s Full Album on Mojo Risin Sound Blog

 

 

Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Fever Tree – “Time Is Now”

Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Fever Tree (Houston, Texas, U.S.A.)

“Time Is Now” (written by S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) B3 track included on the album “Creation”

Released on UNI Records (73067) in 1969

Line-up :

Fever Tree
Kevin Kelley – Drums
E. E. Wolfe – Bass
Michael Knust – Guitar
Grant Johnson – Keyboards
Dennis Keller – Bass, Vocals
With
John Tuttle – Drums
Rob Landis – Keyboards
Hal Blaine – Drums
David Cohen – Guitar
Walt Mescal – Guitar
Joe Osborne – Bass
Larry Knechtal – Piano
Billy Gibbons – Guitar
The Blackberries – Vocals

Arranged By [Strings And Horns] – David Angel (3) (tracks: B2)

Arranged By [Strings] – Gene Page (tracks: A2, B4)

Coordinator [Production Coordinator] – Doctor Don

Engineer [Chief Engineer] – Walter Andrus

Mastered By – Sandy Lehmann-Haupt

Painting [Cover Painting] – Dub Wethersby III

Producer – Scott Holtzman, Vivian Holtzman

Lyrics :

Don’t you know the time is now
Tomorrow is too far away
Can’t you see the time is now
I won’t wait another day

Don’t you know the time is now
If you look it’s very clear
Don’t you know the time is now
Can’t you see the place
In ay
I can’t wait, the time is now
I can’t wait
I don’t know
I don’t know
I don’t know how

Don’t you know the time is now
Let her…
Oh you better get it straight
Don’t you know the time is now
Hurry up, it’s getting late
Don’t you know the time is now
Can’t you see her place is here
Don’t you know the time is now
Don’t you know
Don’t you know
Oh don’t you know

Track Listing :

1. Woman, Woman (Woman) (Jancy Lee Tyler) – 2:33
2. Love Makes The Sun Rise (F. Davis, S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 2:32
3.Catcher In The Rye (R. Landes, S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 3:12
4.Wild Woman Ways (Jancy Lee Tyler) – 4:05
5.Fever Blue (S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 3:33
6.Run Past My Window (Jancy Lee Tyler) – 3:25
7.Imitation Situation (Complete And Unabridged) (R. Landes, S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 4:47
8.Time Is Now (S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 4:05
9.The God Game (R. Landes, S, Holtzman, V. Holtzman) – 4:35

Although a Texas, USA-based act, Fever Tree made its mark with a tribute to the Summer of Love’s host city with their 1968 anthem ‘San Francisco Girls (Return Of The Native)’. Comprising Rob Landes (keyboards), Dennis Keller (vocals), E.E. Wolfe (bass), John Tuttle (drums) and Michael Knust (guitar), the psychedelic band formed in Houston, Texas, in the mid-60s as Bostwick Vine. The name change came in 1967 and the band subsequently signed with the Chicago-based Mainstream Records.

Two unsuccessful singles were recorded, and the unit then signed to Uni Records, and recorded their self-titled debut album in 1968. ‘San Francisco Girls (Return Of The Native)’ was penned by Vivian Holtzman, one of the band’s producers. Although only a minor chart hit, it received much airplay on the new USA FM rock stations and on John Peel’s Top Gear radio programme in the UK. Fever Tree recorded four albums, three of which charted in the USA, before splitting up in 1970. Interest in the band was renewed in the mid-80s psychedelic revival, and compilation albums were issued in both the USA and UK.
Their third and fourth albums presented here,  find the legendary Houston ’60s psych band moving away from their pop/psych West Coast leanings and developing an introspective darker edge. Both albums include some great sounds, with a monster 13 minute cover of “Hey Joe” being the highlight….
For Sale is first, Though credited as a Fever Tree release, 1970’s ironically-titled “For Sale” was little more than a collection of the earlier Mainstream sides (which may have been rerecorded) and leftover Uni-era odds and ends. A quick glance at the liner notes indicated the band had basically collapsed with keyboardist Rob Landis and drummer John Tuttle credited as ‘formerly of Fever Tree’.
Their places were taken by former Byrds drummer Kevin Kelley, keyboardist Grant Johnson, and various members of the Wrecking Crew and The Blackberries on ill thought out backing vocals and Dennis Keller’s vocals shine on the old standard “I Put a Spell on You,” (not to mention some luscious background singing by the Blackberries, who later warbled in Humble Pie) and the Love song, “She Comes In Colors.” Two of the cuts, “Girl Don’t Push Me” and “Hey Mister” are actually early singles;(For Sale was the band’s fourth album and was put together as they were breaking up.) In short For Sale is good but not great.
Again produced by husband and wife team of Scott and Vivian Holzman in 1969 Creation:starting with “Woman, Woman” (not the Gary Puckett song), the remaining cuts are from Creation and are all excellent, particularly “Wild Woman Ways,” “Catcher in the Rye”, “Run Past My Window”, and “Time is Now,” the latter featuring excellent guitar work by future ZZ Top frontman Billy Gibbons.
All of the band’s work is first-rate, particularly that of Dennis Keller and superb keyboardist Rob Landes. (Note: Landes is serving as organist and musical director at a church in Houston; not surprising, since many Fever Tree songs are reminiscent of liturgical music at it’s finest.)

The group originated in Houston, Texas and began in 1966 as a folk rock group called The Bostwick Vines. They changed their name to Fever Tree a year later after the addition of keyboard player Rob Landes.

The band briefly entered the public consciousness when their song “San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native)” reached No. 91 in the U.S. on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in June 1968.Like most of the band’s material, it was written by the couple of Scott and Vivian Holtzman, who also were their producers. This four-minute track captured all the band’s trademarks: Dennis Keller’s incantation-like vocals, the quick shifting between slow parts with an almost sacral feeling and faster, more rock-oriented parts, and especially the searing guitar work by Michael Knust.

Fever Tree also released their self-titled debut album, Fever Tree, in 1968, which charted at No. 156 on the Billboard 200 Chart.  A second album, Another Time, Another Place, followed in 1969 and peaked at No. 83 with a third album Creation, charting at No. 97 on the Billboard 200 Chart in 1970. Apart from “San Francisco Girls”, they never had another hit, although they later also tried writing songs themselves when they had dropped the Holtzmans as producers. The group disbanded in 1970, but reformed in 1978 with only guitarist Michael Knust remaining from the original line-up. The new formation of the group had little commercial success; Fever Tree was not heard of again until 2003 when Michael Knust died.

Fever Tree’s first two albums (Fever Tree and Another Time, Another Place) were re-released as a single CD on October 31, 2006. Fever Tree’s third and fourth albums (Creation and For Sale) are also available as a single CD.

Their recording of “Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won’t Do)” by Steve Cropper, Eddie Floyd, and Wilson Pickett was sampled as the primary riff in Madvillain’s “America’s Most Blunted” from their 2004 self-titled debut.

Band members :

Dennis Keller – vocals

Michael Stephen Knust (March 11, 1949 – September 15, 2003) – guitar

Rob Landes – synthesizer, organ, piano

E.E. “Bud” Wolfe – bass guitar

John Tuttle – drums

Don Lampton – guitar, keyboards

Discography :

Albums :

Fever Tree (1968), Uni Records/MCA

Another Time, Another Place (1968), Uni/MCA Tracks: A1 Man Who Paints the Pictures – Part 2 A2 What Time Did You Say It Is In Salt Lake City? A3 Don’t Come Crying To Me Girl A4 Fever A5 Grand Candy Young Street B1 Jokes Are For Sad People B2 I’ve Never Seen Evergreen B3 Peace of Mind B4 Death Is The Dancer

Creation (1969), Uni/MCA

For Sale (1970), Ampex Records

Live at Lake Charles (1978), Shroom Records

Singles :

“Girl Oh Girl (Don’t Push Me)” / “Steve Lenore” (1967)

“Hey Mister” / “I Can Beat Your Drum” (1968)

“Girl, Oh Girl” / “Steve Lenore” (1968)

“Come with Me” / “San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native)” (1968)

“What Time Did You Say It Is in Salt Lake City?” / “Where Did You Go” (1968)

 

Fever Tree – “Creation” Album photo (A’ Side)

FEVER TREE CREATION 2

 

Fever Tree – “Creation” Album photo (B’ Side)

FEVER TREE CREATION 1

 

Fever Tree – “Creation” Album cover photo (front)

FEVER TREE CREATION 5

 

Fever Tree – “Time Is Now” Video file link on YouTube

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Spotify

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Discogs

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Rock And Roll History

Fever Tree Article about the band on Houston Press

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Google Music Store

Fever Tree Band’s Page on Apple Music

Fever Tree Full Albums Download Links on Rockasteria Blog

 

Hard Rock/Progressive Rock/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) Deep Purple – “The Shield”

Hard Rock/Progressive/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Deep Purple (Hertford, Hertfordshire, U.K.)

“The Shield” (written by Lord, Blackmore, Evans) B1 track included on the album “The Book Of Taliesyn” 

Released on Tetragrammaton Records ( T-107) in the U.S.A. (October 1968),  on Harvest ‎(SHVL 751) in the U.K. (1969)

Line-up/Credits :

Rod Evans / lead vocals
Ritchie Blackmore / lead guitar
Jon Lord / Hammond organ, backing vocals, string arrangements (6)
Nick Simper / bass, backing vocals
Ian Paice / drums

Production :

  • Derek Lawrence – producer, mixing
  • Barry Ainsworth – engineer
  • Peter Mew – restoring and remastering at Abbey Road Studios, London (2000)

Track Listing :

1. Listen, Learn, Read On (4:04)
2. Wring That Neck (also known as “Hard Road”) (5:13)
3. Kentucky Woman (Neil Diamond cover) (4:44)
4. Exposition / We Can Work It Out (Beatles cover) (7:07)
5. Shield (6:06)
6. Anthem (6:31)
7. River Deep, Mountain High (Ike & Tina Turner cover) (10:12)

Total time 44:00

Bonus tracks on 2000 remaster:
8. Oh No No No (Studio outtake Dec ’68) (4:25)
9. It’s All Over (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (4:14)
10. Hey Bop A Re Bop (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (3:31)
11. Wring That Neck (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (4:42)
12. Playground (Remixed instrumental studio outtake, Aug ’68) (4:29)

Lyrics :

Mama plays a queen on the hill built on a dream
While the children play in the field
Papa smokes the pipe of a sweet and better life
But how strong is the shield?
Can peace be found on the carpet above ground
Where sky is forever blue
So let it pass baby now, the slow and riding cloud
Which may take me from you
Many things a man can lose
His self, his rights, his views
But never his heart or his love
So take this hand of mine and climb baby, climb
To the hill up above
Now you can play a queen on the hill built on a dream
While our children play in the field
I can smoke the pipe of a sweet and better life
And trust in the strength of the shield
So trust in you love, and Lucy of above
And let light pass like a wheel
Don’t take the chance of life’s hectic dance
Kiss the strength of the shield
The seeker will be found by the looker on the ground
And to his wish he will yield
Fate will have it’s word, of course
(Think this line is wrong)
And time will change its course
And hold the strength of the shield
Songwriters: Jon Lord / Ritchie Blackmore / Rod Evans
Shield” or “The Shield” is a Blackmore/Lord/Evans composition. The fifth track on the band’s second album runs to 5 minutes 59 seconds, and has a distinctly psychedelic feel to it. It appears to be a song about family life, philosophising, etc, and some sources include the line “So trust in you love, and Lucy of above” in the lyrics, which appears to be a reference to “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”. As this well known Beatles track was released the year before The Book Of Taliesyn, this is plausible, however, this line is actually a mondegreen, a misheard lyric.

Founded in Hertford, UK in 1968 – Hiatus between 1976-1984 – Still active as of 2018

The archetypal hard rock band, hugely influential, and still alive and well after almost 40 years, DEEP PURPLE were formed in Hertford (England) in 1968. Their earliest line-up (known as Mark I) featured guitarist Ritchie BLACKMORE, drummer Ian Paice (who was to be the only constant member in all the numerous incarnations of the band), keyboardist Jon LORD, bassist Nick Simper and vocalist Rod Evans. Their first album, “Shades of Deep Purple”, included a cover of JOE SOUTH’s “Hush”, which became a big hit in the USA. The following two efforts were definitely more progressive in tone, especially their third, self-titled album, which saw Lord’s masterful, classically-influenced use of the B3 Hammond organ steal the limelight.

In 1969, Evans and Simper were fired, to be replaced by two former Episode Six members, bassist Roger Glover and legendary vocalist Ian Gillan, who had also starred in the lead role in the original version of Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Tim Rice’s “Jesus Christ Superstar”. This line-up, which is widely known as DEEP PURPLE Mark II, gave the band international renown – even though their first album, Lord’s pet project “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (recorded with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra) was poorly received.

With Gillan and Glover on board, DEEP PURPLE recorded a series of extremely successful albums, which saw them blend the progressive stylings of their first three albums with an increasingly harder-edged approach, like 1970′ ground-breaking “In Rock”. Their sound featured lengthy, dazzling duels between Lord’s Hammond and Blackmore’s Stratocaster, punctuated by Gillan’s sky-high screams – nowhere better embodied than in their stunning, 1972 live album, “Made in Japan”. In the same year, they released “Machine Head”, one of the essential rock albums of all time, which featured the seminal riff of “Smoke on the Water” (inspired by a true episode happened during the recording of the album itself in Montreux, Switzerland), as well as other classics such as “Highway Star” and “Space Truckin'”.

Unfortunately, ego clashes and differences in musical direction caused the departure of both Gillan and Glover, who were replaced by an already established musician (also possessed of awesome pipes), former TRAPEZE bassist and vocalist Glenn Hughes, and an unknown singer from North Yorkshire, David Coverdale, whose deep, bluesy voice was distinctly different from Gillan’s high-pitched wail. The first Mark III album, “Burn”, released in 1974, ranks amongst the band’s best efforts, with the furious, barnstorming title-track quickly becoming another mainstay of their live performances.

However, Hughes’s leanings towards funk and soul clashed with Blackmore’s own musical orientation, which led to the latter’s split from the band immediately after the release of “Stormbringer”. He was replaced by American whizzkid Tommy Bolin, formerly with JAMES GANG, who had also played on Billy Cobham’s ground-breaking first solo album, “Spectrum”. Unfortunately, Bolin was a drug addict, while Hughes had also begun his descent into alcoholism and cocaine addiction. The band’s only Mark IV album, 1975’s “Come Taste the Band”, is a highly underrated masterpiece of funk-tinged hard rock. It also signalled the dissolution of the band, after Bolin’s tragic death of a heroin overdose in 1976.

It seemed to be the end for DEEP PURPLE, and as a matter of fact it was for nearly eight years – until the five original MK II members got together and decided to give it a go once again. The result was 1984’s excellent “Perfect Strangers”, a true return to form whose magnificent, Eastern-tinged title track has since become one of the band’s undisputed classics. However, the idyll was not fated to last: 1987’s “The House of Blue Light” was a much weaker effort, and the tensions between Blackmore and Gillan resurfaced, causing the latter to leave the band. He was replaced by Blackmore’s former RAINBOW sidekick, American vocalist Joe Lynn Turner, whose presence on 1990’s “Slaves and Masters” album gave the band’s sound a definitely AOR slant that put off many of their earlier fans. In 1992, Gillan rejoined the band in order to record the aptly-titled “The Battle Rages On”; however, during the tour in support of the album his conflict with Blackmore got out of hand, and the guitarist left – this time, never to return.

DEEP PURPLE managed to complete the tour by enlisting the help of guitar wonder JOE SATRIANI, who nevertheless declined their offer to join the band permanently. They found Blackmore’s replacement in yet another American, former DIXIE DREGS and KANSAS guitarist Steve MORSE. A legend in his own right, Morse brought fresh ideas to the band, as well as a much more relaxed approach to personal relationships. The new line-up managed to record two albums, “Purpendicular” (1996) and “Abandon” (1998), before, in 2003, founding member Jon Lord left the band in order to rest from constant touring and dedicate himself to his own musical projects. His replacement was found in a veteran of the British rock scene, former Colosseum II keyboardist Don Airey. This new version of the band is still active and touring in the 21st century. Their latest album, “Rapture of the Deep” (2005), is certainly one of their best efforts since they got back together in 1984. Even in their early sixties, the members of DEEP PURPLE still have a lot to offer to the rock world.

The Book of Taliesyn is the second studio album by English rock band Deep Purple, recorded only three months after Shades of Deep Purple and released by Tetragrammaton Records in October 1968, just before their first US tour. The name for the album was taken from the 14th-century Book of Taliesin.

The structure of the album is similar to that of their debut, with four original songs and three rearranged covers, although the tracks are longer, the arrangements more complex and the sound more polished than on Shades of Deep Purple. The music style is a mix of psychedelic rock, progressive rock and hard rock, with several inserts of classical music arranged by the band’s keyboard player Jon Lord.

Deep Purple’s American record label aimed for a hippie audience, which was very influential in the US at the time, but the chart results of the album and singles were not as high as expected. This setback did not hinder the success of the three-month US tour, when the band played in many important venues and festivals and received positive feedback from audiences and the press. Deep Purple were still an underground band which played in small clubs and colleges in the United Kingdom, largely ignored by the media and the public. British record company EMI did not release The Book of Taliesyn until June 1969, on the new underground prog rock sub-label Harvest Records, and the album did not chart. Even the release of the new single “Emmaretta” and new dates in their home country in the summer of 1969 did not increase album sales or the popularity of Deep Purple in the UK. Perception of the album changed later years, when it received more favourable reviews.

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Album photo (B Side)

DEEP PURPLE THE BOOK OF TALIESYN 1

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Album cover photo (front)

DEEP PURPLE THE BOOK OF TALIESYN 2 (2)

Deep Purple – “The Shield” Video file link on YouTube

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Deep Purple Band’s Homepage

Deep Purple – “The Highway Star” Band’s Fan Club Page

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Facebook

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Twitter

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Spotify

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Discogs

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Deezer

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Setlist Fm

Deep Purple Band’s Appreciation Society Page

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Apple Music

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Google Music Store

Deep Purple Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Deep Purple Band’s Page on ProgArchives

 

 

 

 

 

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Progressive/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) Mighty Baby – “Egyptian Tomb”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Progressive/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Mighty Baby (London, U.K.)

“Egyptian Tomb” (written by Might Baby) A1 (opening track) included on the album “Mighty Baby” 

Released on Head Records (HDLS 6002) in 1969

Also it was released as an A’ Side single (B’ Side single “I Am From The Country”), on Philips Records

Tracks :

1. Egyptian Tomb – 5:28
2. A Friend You Know but Never See – 4:24
3. I’ve Been Down So Long – 5:05
4. Same Way From the Sun – 5:37
5. House Without Windows – 6:10
6. Trials of a City – 5:58
7. I’m From the Country – 4:49
8. At a Point Between Fate and Destiny – 4:44
9. Only Dreaming – 3:16
10. Dustbin Full of Rubbish – 2:47
11. Understanding Love – 3:50
12. Favourite Days – 3:54
13. A Saying for Today – 3:27

Compositions from 1-8 by Mighty Βaby
Songs 9-13 written by Ian Whiteman and perfomed by The Action

Migty Βaby :

Alan King – Guitar, Vocals
Michael Evans  – Bass
Roger Powell  – Drums
Martin Stone  – Guitars
Ian Whiteman  – Flute, Organ, Percussion, Piano, Saxophone, Vocals

Lyrics :

I was born in a world that can easily bring you down
I was torn from the tomb of the foolish Egyptian crown

[chorus]
Good morning, day,
by evening, my way,
I said my way

I was raised in a town where the people don’t understand
What it is to have lived in a different place and time.

[chorus]

[psych scat]

An Egyptian tomb..
An Egyptian tomb..
An Egyptian tomb..

La, la, la, la, la

I was born in a world that can easily bring you down
I was torn from the tomb of the foolish Egyptian crown

[chorus]

An Egyptian tomb.. x 8

Information about the band

UK act MIGHTY BABY was formed in 1968, featuring several members of the newly disbanded outfit The Action. They hit the studio right away, and had an album ready by the end of ’68, which eventually was released at the tail end of 1969 on the Head Records label.

During 1970 many of the members in the band converted to Islam, and when their second album A Jug of Love appeared in 1971, the alteration in religious and philosophical view by the band’s members had also affected their stylistic expression, resulting in a vastly different sophomore effort.

This second production also proved to be the final albums to come from this band. In later years archival cocncert recordings have surfaced from time to time, capturing a band keen on improvisation while performing live.

Mighty Baby stands as one of the most cohesive and coveted of 1960s UK psych. It is the complete package, blistering guitar work from Martin Stone, studio trickery, amazing songwriting, great vocals, this record is the real deal and fully deserving of its reputation. The band would go on to record with legends like Keith Christmas, Sandy Denny, and more, as well as record a second album in 1971, but nothing can surpass the pure psych perfection of their debut.

In 1968, the Summer of Love was exerting it’s influence on pop and fashion trends and, in the UK, many of the previous year’s Mod movement were heeding the call to ‘get your head together, man’ and go ‘progressive’. The Action had been one of the most respected of London’s mod bands but in late ’68, founder members guitarist Alan King, bassist Mike Evans and drummer Roger Powell were joined by pianist lan Whiteman and ex-Savoy Brown guitarist Martin Stone in a brand new band Mighty Baby. The group’s 1969 debut album Mighty Baby was strong on melody and instrumental technique and Egyptian Tomb is a perfect summation of what the band’s recorded music was all about. “Live”, they extended their performances, as did most groups of the era. Stone’s guitar soloing being lauded for its imaginative approach. They cut a second album A Jug Of Love before disbanding. Stone later formed Chilli Willi And The Red Hot Peppers while King became a member of pub-rock band Ace. This CD reissue combines their first album with 5 tracks made when King, Evans and Powell were still The Action and the sleeve notes by Record Collector magazines John Reed chart the history of one of the best of the late 60s/early 70s “head” bands.

 The band was formed as The Boys in August 1963, in Kentish Town, North West London. After Peter Watson  joined them as an additional guitarist in 1965, they changed their name to The Action. The original members were Reg King (lead vocals), Alan ‘Bam’ King (lead guitar, vocals), Mike “Ace” Evans (bass guitar, vocals and Roger Powell (drums).

Shortly after their formation, they signed to Parlophone with producer George Martin. “Land of a Thousand Dances” b/w “In My Lonely Room” was well received by critics, but sold poorly. None of the Action’s singles achieved success in the UK Singles Chart.

After disastrous experiences with the Rikki Farr management, Peter Watson left the band in 1966. They continued as quartet, but were dropped from Parlophone in 1967. In the late 1960s keyboardist Ian Whiteman and guitarist Martin Stone joined the band and the Actionmoved toward a mid-tempo psychedelic balladstyle, and then into folk rock. Reg King left the band in 1967, and Alan King took over as main lead vocalist. In 1969, when signing to John Curd’s Head Records, the band was renamed Mighty Baby.  Alan King later went on to form Ace.

Notably, they are one of the favourite bands of Phil Collins, who performed with the reunited band in 2000. “For me it was like playing with the Beatles“, he later commented on the experience.

Albums :

Mighty Baby (1969)
A Jug of Love (1971)

Singles & EPs :

Egyptian Tomb / I’m From the Country (1969)
Devil’s Whisper / Virgin Spring (Jun, 1971)

Alan “Bam” King – GuitarVocals (in band: 1968 – 1971)
Ian Whiteman – FluteOrganPercussionPianoSaxophoneVocals (in band: 1968 – 1971)
Martin Stone – GuitarSlide guitar (in band: 1968 – 1971)
Mike Evans – Bass Guitar (in band: 1968 – 1971)
Roger Powell – Drums (in band: 1968 – 1971)
Mighty Baby – “Mighty Baby” Album cover photo (front)
MIGHTY BABY 1969 2 (2)
Mighty Baby – “Mighty Baby” Album photo (A’ Side)
MIGHTY BABY 19691
Mighty Baby – “Egyptian Tomb” Single Album cover photo (front), French Edition, Philips Records -, 1970
MIGHTY BABY EGYPTIAN TOMB 1 (2)
Mighty Baby – “Egyptian Tomb” Single cover photo (front) Dutch Edition, Philips Records (6073 900), 1970
MIGHTY BABY EGYPTIAN TOMB 2