The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “The World’s On Fire” (1967)

Band : The Strawberry Alarm Clock (Formed in 1967, in Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.)

Country Of Origin : U.S.A.

Track : “The World’s On Fire” (Opening track)

Album : “Incense And Peppermints (Debut Album)

Label : UNI Records (73014)

Date/Year Of Release : November 1967

Category/Music Genres : Acid Rock, Psychedelic Rock, U.S.A., 1960s


The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “The World’s On Fire”

Video on YouTube

Lyrics 

The world (the world)
Is on fire tonight (tonight)
And this flame that glows (flame that glows)
Is too hot for me to fight (to fight)
Dancing flames (dancing flames)
Twisting, turning out of sight (turning out of sight)
Smoke-filled eyes (smoke-filled eyes)
Crying, “Hold me, hold me tight” (me tight)

Tears of joy
And sad, smiling faces
Oh, make the sparkle above the brightly night

The world (the world)
Is on fire tonight (tonight)
And the flame that flows (flame that flows)
Is still burning oh so bright (so bright)
Blazing arms (blazing arms)
With a heavy appetite (appetite)
The swirling flames (swirling flames)
Blinding everyone in sight (in sight)

Sweat-filled traces
In common places
The price we pay to hear this type of fight

Fire
Fire
Fire
We’re on fire tonight

The song is included on the album “Incense And Peppermints” and it’s the album’s opening track.

“Incense And Peppermints” album 

Album cover photo (front)

Image result for strawberry alarm clock incense and peppermints

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Incense and Peppermints is the first album by psychedelic rock band Strawberry Alarm Clock. Released in November 1967, the album reached No. 11 on the Billboard 200 album charts and included the band’s No. 1 Billboard Hot 100 hit “Incense and Peppermints”. In addition to the six official members of the band, the album also featured the flute playing of Steve Bartek, who co-wrote four songs on the album with bass player George Bunnell.

The tracks “The World’s on Fire”, “Rainy Day Mushroom Pillow” and “Incense and Peppermints” were all featured in the motion picture Psych-Out, along with a new song, “Pretty Song from Psych-Out”, which later appeared on the band’s second album, Wake Up…It’s Tomorrow.

A compilation album of the same name (albeit spelled with an ampersand) was released by MCA in 1990. To date, the album has been released on CD only in Japan and (more recently) on Sundazed Records.

Tracks

1. The World’s on Fire (E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 8:25
2. Birds in My Tree (S. Bartek, G. Bunnell) – 1:54
3. Lose to Live (C. King, T. Stern) – 3:15
4. Strawberries Mean Love (G. Bunnell) – 3:02
5. Rainy Day Mushroom Pillow (S. Bartek, G. Bunnell) – 3:04
6. Paxton’s Back Street Carnival (S. Bartek, E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 2:04
7. Hummin’ Happy (E. King, G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, M. Weitz, R. Seol) – 2:24
8. Pass Time With The SAC (G. Bunnell, L. Freeman, E. King, J. Pitman, M. Weitz) – 1:21
9. Incense and Peppermints (J. Carter, T. Gilbert) – 2:47
10.Unwind with the Clock (E. King, M. Weitz) – 4:13

Line-up 
George Bunnell – 2nd Bass Guitar, Vocals
Randy Seol – Drums, Bongos, Vibes, Vocals
Lee Freeman –  Rhythm Guitar, Harmonica, Vocals
Edward King – Guitar, Vocals
Mark Weitz – Vocals, Organ, Piano, Harpsichord
Gary Lovetro – 1st Bass Guitar, Vocals

Credits 

Producer – Bill Holmes, Frank Slay

Photography By – Ed Caraeff

Engineer – Paul Buff

Design [Cover Design] – Lazarus/LePrevost

Arranged By – Ed King (2), Howard Davis (2), Mark Weitz

Other [Advice] – Johnny Fairchild

Other [Clothing] – Sat Purish

External Links

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Video Playlist on YouTube

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Audio/Video Playlist on Last Fm

The Strawberry Alarm Clock – “Incense And Peppermints” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

 

 

 

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks) Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales” Track’s video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues Rock, Jazz Rock, Psychedelic Rock, Norway 1960s (Tracks)

Artist :

Terje Rypdal ( Oslo, Norway)

Terje Rypdal Artist’s photo

Image result for terje rypdal

Related Groups :

Dream (6), Jan Garbarek Quartet, Min Bul, Morning Glory (2), Terje Rypdal Trio, Terje Rypdals Orchestra,The Baden-Baden Free Jazz Orchestra, The Chasers, The Esoteric Circle, The George Russell Sextet,The Hugger Muggers, The New Eternal Rhythm Orchestra, The Terje Rypdal Group, The Tomasz Stanko Septet, The Vanguards

Track :

“Dead Man’s Tales” A1 track included on the album “Bleak House”

Album :

“Bleak House”, released on Polydor Records (184 189) in 1968

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Recorded on Oct 7th, 8th and 22nd 1968, at Roger Arnhoff Lydstudio, Oslo, Norway.

A3: “A free form composition based on an idea by T. Rypdal”. The composer credited for B1 is “xxx”.

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

C- Terje Rypdal / guitar, flute, vocals, producer

With:

Christian Reim / piano, organ (3,5)
Carl Magnus Neumann / alto sax & flute (2,5)
Hans Knudsen / baritone sax (2,5)
Jan Garbarek / tenor sax, flute & bells (2-5)
Frode Thingnæs / trombone & tuba (4,5)
Kjell Haugen / trombone (2,4,5)
Tore Nilsen / trombone (2)
Øivind Westby / trombone (2)
Ditlef Eckhoff / trumpet (2)
Jarl Johansen / trumpet (2-5)
Kåre Furuholmen / trumpet (2,4)
Frøydis Ree Hauge / horn (5,6)
Odd Ulleberg / horn (5,6)
Knut Riisnæs / tenor sax (3), arranger & conductor (2,4,5)
Terje Venaas / bass (2-5)
Tom Karlsen / drums (1)
Jon Christensen / drums (2-5)arl Magnus Neumann (tracks: A2 to B2)

Arranged By – Knut Riisnæs (tracks: A2, B1, B2)

Composed By – Terje Rypdal

Engineer [Recording] – Roger Arnhoff

Photography By – Sohlberg Foto

Producer – Terje Rypdal

Recording Supervisor – Odd Løken

Track-list :

1. Dead Man´s Tale (7:03)
2. Wes (4:15)
3. Winter Serenade (6:04):
– a) Falling Snow
– b) Snow Storm
– c) Melting Snow
4. Bleak House (7:05)
5. Sonority (5:21)
6. A Feeling Of Harmony (2:29)

Total time 33:05

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover/track-list photo (back)

Information related to the artist :

“Wikipedia”

Terje Rypdal (born 23 August 1947) is a Norwegian guitarist and composer. He has been an important member in the Norwegian jazz community, and has also given show concerts with guitarists Ronni Le Tekrø and Mads Eriksen as “N3”.

Rypdal was born in Oslo, the son of a composer and orchestra leader. He studied classical piano and trumpet as a child, and then taught himself to play guitar as he entered his teens. Starting out as a Hank Marvin-influenced rock guitarist with The Vanguards, Rypdal turned towards jazz in 1968 and joined Jan Garbarek’s group and later George Russell’s sextet and orchestra. An important step towards international attention was his participation in the free jazz festival in Baden-Baden, Germany, in 1969, where he was part of a band led by Lester Bowie. During his musical studies at Oslo university and conservatory, he led the orchestra of the Norwegian version of the musical Hair. He has often been recorded on the ECM record label, both jazz-oriented material and classical compositions (some of which do not feature Rypdal’s guitar).

His compositions “Last Nite” and “Mystery Man” were featured in the Michael Mann film Heat, and included on the soundtrack of the same name.

Rypdal was married (1969–1985) to the Norwegian singer Inger Lise Andersen/Rypdal, and they had two children, the auditor Daniel (1970) and the electronica musician Marius (1977). Rypdal was married again in 1988 to Elin Kristin Bergei (born 28 May 1955). They have two children Ane Izabel (1988) and the guitarist Jakob Rypdal (1989). They (as of 2013) live in Tresfjord.

“All Music”

Norwegian guitarist Terje Rypdal has an instantly recognizable, difficult to peg style, both an as ensemble player and as a soloist. He has directly or indirectly influenced virtually every one of his countrymen who followed him on the instrument. He is also a virtuoso multi-instrumentalist and, perhaps most importantly, a world-class composer. He has written six symphonies, numerous chamber works, and sonatas.

Rypdal was born in Oslo in 1947, the son of a conductor and clarinetist for a military band. He began his musical studies on the piano by the age of five, and at eight added trumpet. He abandoned both instruments at age 13 for the guitar. On his chosen instrument, Rypdal was self-taught. Between 1962 and 1967 he was part of the Vanguards, a Norwegian instrumental rock group modeled on the Ventures and the British Shadows, but all that changed when he heard Jimi Hendrix for the first time. Rypdal started the psychedelic rock band Dream in late 1967; they recorded their sole album, Get Dreamy, for Polydor in 1968. That same year he formed another band with saxophonist Jan Garbarek and drummer Jon Christensen, and released his first ambitious meld of rock, classical, and jazz with Bleak House for Polydor under his own name.

Rypdal originally attended the Technical University in Trondheim to become an electrical engineer, but left to study musicology at the University of Oslo. He later attended the Music Conservatory in Oslo (later renamed the Norwegian State Academy of Music) from 1970-1972, where he studied with composers Finn Mortensen and George Russell. Rypdal was part of Garbarek’s quartet for Afric Pepperbird, the saxophonist’s debut for ECM in 1970. He made his debut as a composer with Eternal Circulation in 1971, which was performed with by the Garbarek Quartet and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Rypdal also played with Russell in concert and in the studio, resulting in several offerings including George Russell Presents the Esoteric Circle, and Electric Sonata for Souls Loved by Nature, both issued in 1971. He appeared on Garbarek’s sophomore ECM date Sart, and recorded his self-titled debut for the label (he has been there ever since) that same year. Some of his sidemen for the date included Garbarek, bassist Arild Andersen, and pianist Bobo Stenson. This album walked a generous line between free jazz, progressive, psychedelic rock, and more avant-garde classical music. It established Rypdal as a composer and guitarist throughout Europe.

In 1972, he appeared on the live, star-studded session that was released as Morning Glory in 1973 on Antilles; the other players included John Surman, John Marshall, Chris Laurence, John Taylor, and Malcolm Griffiths. In 1973, Rypdal recorded with Russell again; the ensuing offering was entitled Listen to the Silence. He also composed Concerto for Violbasso and Orchestra for Barre Phillips. He released two of his own albums for ECM in 1974, Whenever I Seem to Be Far Away and What Comes After.

The year 1975 proved monumental for Rypdal. His Symphony No. 1 was commissioned by Norwegian Television, and he released the widely acclaimed double-album Odyssey, which was regarded as the pinnacle of jazz-rock fusion. The Odyssey Band toured the globe and was especially successful in the U.S.A. In 1976, Rypdal did a turnabout, and released the musically impressionistic After the Rain, on which he performed all instruments. He also recorded with Russell but went back to his ensemble work with 1978’s Waves. Rypdal finished the ’70s with a trio date, co-billed with collaborators bassist Miroslav Vitous and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

He commenced the new decade with Descendre, a trio session with Christensen and trumpeter Palle Mikkelborg. Rypdal played keyboards and flute in addition to guitar. To Be Continued, the second album with Vitous and DeJohnette, appeared in 1981. After touring and an extended break during which he worked on his classical composing, Rypdal emerged with his first duet album for ECM, the vanguard classical, electro-acoustic work, Eos in 1984. The guitarist returned to a trio format for The Chaser and Blue in 1985 and 1986, respectively. The latter year also saw the release of a 1970 date he and Garbarek had recorded with the George Russell Sextet, A Trip to Prillargui, released on Soul Note. Rypdal also recorded his groundbreaking modern classical work, Undisonus in 1986 (though it wouldn’t see release for four more years) and composed two more symphonies. In 1989 he released The Singles Collection, a jazz-rock quartet date that focused on exceedingly brief compositions.

The album, Undisonus for Violin and Orchestra / Ineo for Choir and Chamber Orchestra, was finally released in 1990 to massive critical acclaim, and received the “Work of the Year” prize from the Society of Norwegian Composers. It was followed by the long-form work Q.E.D. in 1993, and the jazz-cum-neo-classical fusion set If Mountains Could Sing in 1995. Also that year, Rypdal recorded as a session player with pianist and composer Ketil Bjørnstad’s group on The Sea, and as part of Surman’s ensemble on Nordic Quartet, both issued on ECM. In 1997, the guitarist issued Skywards, a sextet date that walked the line between formal jazz composition and free improvisation. He finished the decade with Bjørnstad on The Sea II, and a guitar duet recording with Ronni Le Tekrø entitled Tekro II on the Grappa label, both in 1998.

Rypdal began the 21st century busier than ever. In addition to receiving commissions to compose, he was part of Markus Stockhausen’s ensemble on Karta, and saw his own Double Concerto/Fifth Symphony issued by ECM. In 2002, his five-movement work, Lux Æterna for soprano, chamber ensemble, organ, trumpet, and guitar, a second album with Tekrø entitled The Radiosong, and his Sonata Op. 73/Nimbus Op. 76 with violinist Birgitte Stærnes, were all released on different labels. In 2006, Vossabrygg, a live sextet date from 2003 inspired by Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew group and early Weather Report, was released by ECM. The date also featured an appearance by Rypdal’s son Marius on turntables and samplers. Life in Leipzig, a duet offering with Bjørnstad, followed in 2008. The large-ensemble tribute to film noir, Crime Scene, appeared in 2010, as did Very Much Alive, a mammoth six-disc concert run by jazz drummer Paolo Vinaccia that featured the guitarist Ståle Storløkken and Mikkelborg. After several festival appearances, the completion of commissions, and some time off, Rypdal returned to recording with 2013’s The Melodic Warrior and large-scale ensemble work conducted by Dennis Russell Davies.

“Progarchives”

Born 23 August 1947 (Oslo, Norway)

He is known as one of the leading modern jazz guitarists in Europe. At the same time he is regarded to be an outstanding composer of contemporary art music. Rypdal has has a multifarious musical career since he started his pop band “The Vanguards” in the 1960’ies. He later started up “Dream” where his interest for jazz was awakened. In 1969 he joined the Jan Garbarek Quartet. At the same time he even played in George Russell’s Sextet and big band. Rypdal has up through the years composed numerous jazz compositions for own as well as other groups.

Terje Rypdal played the piano from he was five years old, and started up with guitar from the age of 13. As a guitarist he is self-taught. He has studied musicology at the University in Oslo. During the years 1970-72 he studied composition with Finn Mortensen at the Music Conservatory in Oslo (Later the Norwegian State Academy of Music). He has also studied improvisation with George Russell.

As a composer Rypdal received his first impulses from Ligeti, Penderecki and Mahler and he soon developed his own style. His début as a composer was with “Eternal Circulation” (1971), performed with Jan Garbarek Quartet and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Among his works can be mentioned: Symphony No. 1 (1975) commissioned by the Norwegian Television. His opera “Orfeo Turns Around and Watches Eurydice”, premiered in 1972 at the Henie Onstad Art Centre outside Oslo. For the American bass player Barre Phillipps we wrote his “Concerto per violbasso e orchestra” (1973). His violin concerto “Undisonus” received the prize “Work of the Year” by the Society of Norwegian Composers. He has composed five symphonies, several works for solo instruments with orchestra, two operas and a large number of contemporary works with participation of jazz musicians.

Terje Rypdal’s compositions witness his versatile musical work, his rich imagination and solid knowledge. One can find poetic moments with an almost impressionistic colour as well as constellations of sound with elements from jazz, late romanticism and avantgardism. In addition to his large production of modern art music he has also a great number of jazz and rock compositions.

with courtesy of the Music Information Centre Norway.

Photos related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album cover photo (front)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album  photo (A’ Side)

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the artist :

Image result for terje rypdal

TERJE RYPDAL 1 (2).png

Links related to the album/track :

Terje Rypdal – “Dead Man’s Tales”Video file link on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Download Link on “Opium Hum”Blog

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Review on “Paste Magazine”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal – “Bleak House” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Apple Music”

Links related to the artist :

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Discogs”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “ECM Records”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Rate Your Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Spotify”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on IMDb

Terje Rypdal on “Notes On The Road” Terje Rypdal’s Odyssey: New York and Beyond the Infinite An interview with Terje Rypdal from 2012 by Gideon Egger and Ying Zhu

Terje Rypdal Shows on “Mixcloud”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Deezer”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Tidal”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Apple Music”

Terje Rypdal Artist’s Page on “Getty Images”

 

 

 

Psychedelic Pop/Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude”

Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Psychedelic Pop/Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Band :

“Birmingham Sunday” (Carson City, Nevada, U.S.A.)

Track :

“Egocentric Solitude” A1 (written by Birmingham Sunday), (opening track) included on the album “A Message From Birmingham Sunday”

Album :

A Message From Birmingham Sunday” (debut album) released on All American Records ( AA-5718) in 1968

Original pressing on red, white and blue label.

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album cover photo (front)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Video on YouTube

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

Debbie Parke – vocals
Joe LaChew – guitar, drums, the vocals
Ward Johns – guitar
John Kvam – bass
Jean Heim – rhythm guitar, the vocals
Phil Gustafson – keyboards, Saxophones
Monty the Johns – drums

Bill Holmes – producer

Track-list :

01. Egocentrick Solitude — 3:15
02. Wondering What To Feel — 2:33
03. Prevalent Visionaries — 2:47
04. You’re Out Of Line — 2:52
05. Medieval Journey — 2:34
06. Mr. Waters (The Judge) — 2:48
07. Fate And The Magician — 1:55
08. Peter Pan Revisited — 2:12
09. Time To Land — 2:59
10. Don’t Turn Around — 2:37

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album’s Track-list photo

Untitled

Information related to the album/band/track :

“Discogs”

US American Psychedelic Rock band from Carson City (Nevada) formed late 1960s.
Four of the musicians went to the same school, where he formed a band that played at local clubs all over northern Nevada and in the Carolinas. In 1968, they were able to conclude a contract with Bill Holmes, the producer of “Strawberry Alarm Clock” and the label “All American Record”. Vinyl has been published as a trial, a limited edition of 100 copies. Although the band played in different styles, the album is a good example of pop psychedelia. Alternating male and female vocals, using wind, keyboard and string instruments.

“Rockasteria”

Birmingham Sunday was formed in September 1966, and they were named after the Sunday concerts that took place in Birmingham, England. The original lineup of Birmingham Sunday featured bassist John Kvam, drummer Monty Johns, guitarist (and Monty’s brother) Ward Johns, organ/sax player Phil Gustafson and guitarist Joe LaChew.

Monty and Ward Johns had been in The Contrasts, who covered popular Beatles and Beach Boys tunes. John Kvam was a guitarist in the folk rock group The Scroachers, and learned bass after joining Birmingham Sunday. Phil Gustafson was the keyboardist and sax player for the rock band The Kensingtons. Gustafson was trained as a pianist and sang in the church choir, and he played sax in his high school band. Even though Phil’s voice could easily handle the demands of opera, he preferred to sing background harmony with Birmingham Sunday. Joe LaChew was the guitarist and vocalist for the group The Freedom Five, who covered the blues-based output of British bands like The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and The Animals. At the age of 15, LaChew earned his stripes as a songwriter when he wrote a campaign song for the Nevada governor at the time, Grant Sawyer. The Freedom Five recorded a single of Joe’s song and sold it at various campaign sites throughout the state.

Birmingham Sunday started to play teen dances throughout northern Nevada. Their biggest crowds were at the Civic Auditorium in Carson City and at Genoa Town Hall. The group put on dances and rented halls in Carson City, Genoa, Minden and Reno to cover their increasing fan base.

In 1967, Birmingham Sunday was poised for their breakthrough. Joe LaChew and Monty Johns were attending the University of Nevada in Reno, and their band had a much greater following – especially since the university dorms and fraternities now had their own party band!

That summer season, Birmingham Sunday landed a house band gig at American Legion Hall in South Lake Tahoe, California. This involved playing five days a week at the hall, plus performing as the opening act for each weekend’s entertainment. The venue was filled every summer night with Californians from the Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay area. Weekend shows were extravaganzas, as well-known San Franciscan acts like The Grateful Dead and Sly And The Family Stone were frequently brought in with local favorites The Family Tree and Jim Burgett.

The American Legion Hall’s weekend festival on July 28-29, 1967 was headlined by The Grateful Dead and Jim Burgett, with Birmingham Sunday, The Justice Five and Velvet Chain on the bill. This festival is where Birmingham Sunday first heard Debbie Parke sing. Debbie was performing a guest spot with The Justice Five at the shows.

A few months later, Debbie Parks joined Birmingham Sunday, adding her strong voice to the mix. She was only 15 and a sophomore in high school. Even though Debbie’s voice was overpowering, she did not try to dominate the band. Instead, her voice blended well with the rest of the singers in the band. Birmingham Sunday was now playing more originals as part of their sets. They began attracting interest from numerous managers and record company scouts.

Phil Gustafson left for the summer to attend National Guard camp, and he was replaced by his younger brother Dave. Dave Gustafson was a child prodigy that could play any style from Beethoven and Bach to Jimmy Smith. In addition, Dave could read and copy nearly everything he heard. His great playing impressed crowds with a note-for-note rendition of The Doors’ “Light My Fire.”

Birmingham Sunday’s success carried them into 1968. Everyone’s favorite hipster, Pat Boone (!), co-sponsored a “Teen Scene” local battle of the bands with promoter Bruce Blaylock. This two-day event was held at Reno’s Centennial Coliseum, where groups like The Kinks, Buffalo Springfield, The Zombies, The Beach Boys and many others had played. The judges were the members of The Sunshine Company, who had recently enjoyed some success. The Sunshine Company had a similar approach and appreciated Birmingham Sunday’s vocal tapestry.

Birmingham Sunday was chosen with the top bands to travel to Las Vegas for the finals. The Las Vegas judges were Strawberry Alarm Clock and their manager/producer Bill Holmes. The Las Vegas band London Fogg won the battle, but Bill Holmes greatly preferred Birmingham Sunday’s original songs and he was very impressed by their vocals.

Birmingham Sunday was invited by promoter Bruce Blaylock to do some recordings in Hollywood. Blaylock was shopping the band to Nitty Gritty Dirt Band manager Bill McEuen as well as a representative of that group’s label, Liberty Records. Birmingham Sunday did an audition and received a record deal from Liberty. The record label had a song that they wanted Birmingham Sunday to record – the “Love Theme From Romeo & Juliet,” also known as “A Time For Us.” It was later recorded by Henry Mancini, Andy Williams and Johnny Mathis.

After hearing the demos, Bill Holmes took on Birmingham Sunday as their producer and manager. Holmes turned down the Liberty deal, which proved to be a big mistake when Henry Mancini’s recording became a big pop hit. Instead, Birmingham Sunday was signed to Bill Holmes’ All-American label.

Meanwhile, the band had changed. Monty Wards left after the “Teen Scene” contest for a rigorous, pre-med schedule at the University of Nevada. Birmingham Sunday auditioned singing drummers, but no one materialized. With concert bookings to be fulfilled and not much time to prepare, Joe LaChew took over as the drummer. Monty had been teaching Joe all the drum parts for their original songs, so LaChew had no problem in this transition period. Since Joe gave up his guitar to play drums, the group had to find another guitarist who could sing well. They found Jean Heim, who played rhythm guitar and a little lead guitar. Heim could also sing lead with his pure, light tenor tone.

The group perfected ten original songs and recorded them in December 1968 with Bill Holmes producing at Original Sound Recording Studios. The studio was located on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, and it was owned by multiple award winning DJ and promoter Art Laboe. The legendary Paul Buff, who previously ran Pal Recording Studio before selling it to his recording partner Frank Zappa, was Original Sound’s engineer. The album “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” was recorded in five days using Buff’s own ten-track studio equipment. Paul Buff also played a Chamberlin keyboard, the American precursor to the mellotron, on the entire album. Buff’s string arrangements on the Chamberlin were essential parts of each song.

All-American selected “Prevalent Visionaries” and “Egocentric Solitude” as the respective A- and B-sides of a single released in early September 1969. The album was released the same month. Before the album was released, Bill Holmes sent a tape of the single to radio stations in Nevada.

“Egocentric Solitude” was first tracked for the week ending August 16, 1969 by Reno, Nevada radio station KIST. It reached the Top 10 in Reno that September 10, and it was #5 on KCBN. Although the single did not receive wide distribution, it did well in Sacramento, Chicago, Seattle, and especially Santa Barbara, where it made #1! The lack of distribution made the album extremely rare, even at the time. About 10 to 20 copies of the original LP are known to exist today.

Many of Bill Holmes’ All-American acts played concerts on July 18-19, 1969 at Kings Beach on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe. On the first day, Birmingham Sunday was the opening act. However, the popularity of the band enabled Birmingham Sunday to close the second night’s show. Holmes had lost control of Strawberry Alarm Clock, so he had the replacement group Strawberry SAC play instead. Gary Solomon, the lyric writer of “Egocentric Solitude,” was in that band. Birmingham Sunday ruled the weekend event!

Birmingham Sunday played concerts throughout 1969, but they split up in 1970 due to a number of forces pulling band members in different directions. Joe LaChew and Monty Johns stayed in college to continue their education. Both Joe and Monty formed the college rock band Brother Rock with Ward Johns. This nine-piece horn band opened for concerts at the college, including shows by Cold Blood, Tower Of Power, The Sons Of Champlin, and most notably, Derek And The Dominoes.

Brother Rock did a recording for the Mercury label in San Francisco, but the tracks have been lost. While influenced by Chicago and The Sons Of Champlin, Brother Rock played original songs by Monty Johns and Joe LaChew.

Debbie Parke, Jean Heim, John Kvam and the Gustafson brothers joined well-known Nevada casino lounge singer Frankie Fanelli. They recorded an album with Fanelli before splitting with him in August 1970. The band members went into different directions:

Joe LaChew continued playing guitar with The Drifters, The Coasters, Billy Preston, The Righteous Brothers, Rose and Joe Maphis, Merle Travis, Dorsey Burnett, Jimmy Dickens, Zella Lehr (an RCA artist), Kathy O’Shea (for MCA) and comedian Rich Little. Joe is now a music teacher in Nevada and still plays shows in the Reno and Lake Tahoe areas. He still enjoys writing music and has done commercials, film music and solo albums. Joe still writes songs for the more recent Birmingham Sunday reunions. Two of those tracks, “Raw Rhythm” and “C’Est La Vie Blues,” are included here for the first time. The famous Birmingham Sunday parties continue to this day!

Debbie Parke became an elementary school teacher and counselor in Lewiston, Idaho. She is now retired. Phil Gustafson retired from the Nevada National Guard. John Kvam was a bartender and journeyman cabinet maker before his retirement. Jean Heim became a country musician and has also retired. Monty Johns is a doctor in West Virginia. Ward Johns was the Vice President of Missile Records. He passed away from compilations due to a stroke in December 2009. Dave Gustafson became a successful musician and very wealthy real estate agent. He passed in January 2010.
by Joe LaChew (Birmingham Sunday)

Photos related to the album/track :

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album cover photo (front)

BIRMINGHAM SUNDAY A MESSAGE FROM (2)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album photo (A’ Side)

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Album photo (B’ Side)

Photos related to the band :

BIRMINGHAM SUNDAY 2 (2)

Links related to the album/track :

Birmingham Sunday – “Egocentric Solitude” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Download Link on “60-70 Rock” Blog

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Birmingham Sunday – “A Message From Birmingham Sunday” Full Album on “Napster”

Links related to the band :

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Discogs”

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Spotify”

Birmingham Sunday Band’s Page on “Napster”

 

Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Ill Wind – “High Flying Bird”

Ill Wind – “High Flying Bird” Video on YouTube

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Full Album Playlist on Spotify

Category/Music Genres :

Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks)

Band :

Ill Wind (Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.)

Members :

Ken Frankel (lead guitar, banjo, 1966-68), Richard Griggs (rhythm guitar, vocals, 1966-71), Carey Mann (bass, guitar, organ, vocals, 1966-70), David Kinsman (drums), Connie Devanney (vocals, 1967-73), Judy Bradbury (vocals, 1966), Michael Walsh (bass, vocals, 1968-73), Larry Carsman (guitar, 1970), Walter Bjorkman (guitar, 1971-73), Bryant Thayer (piano, 1971-72)
Related Artists :
Dirty John’s Hot Dog Stand
Ill Wind Band’s Photo

Related image

Track :

Cover Version 

“High Flying Bird”.

High Flying Bird” (sometimes “High Flyin’ Bird“) is a song written by American folk and country singer-songwriter Billy Edd Wheeler, and first recorded by Judy Henske in 1963. It was performed and recorded by many musicians and groups in the mid and late 1960s, and was influential on the folk rock genre.

It is included on the album “Flashes” as B1 track.

Album :

“Flashes”, released on ABC Records ( ABCS-641) in 1968

ILL WIND FLASHES 3

Line-up/Credits :

Bass, Vocals – Carey Mann

Coordinator – Mark D. Joseph

Design [Cover], Photography By – Bongiorno/Tervinski

Drums – David Kinsman

Engineer [Recording] – Harry Yarmark

Engineer [Remix] – Gary Kellgren

Lead Guitar, Banjo – Ken Frankel

Producer – Tom Wilson (2)

Rhythm Guitar, Vocals – Richard Griggs

Vocals – Connie Devanney

Written-By – Bill Edd Wheeler (tracks: B1), Ken Frankel (tracks: A1 to A4, B2 to B4), Richard Griggs (tracks: A5), Tom Frankel (tracks: A1 to A4, B2 to B4)

Record Company – ABC Records, Inc.

Recorded At – Mayfair Recording Studios

Produced For – Rasputin Production

Mastered At – Longwear Plating

Mastered At – Bell Sound Studios

Published By – Maudlin Melodies, Inc.

Published By – Sleepy Hollow Music

Published By – Robert Lissauer Music Co.

Published By – Bexhill Music

Tracks A2 and B3 are interchanged on the cover. The label lists them correctly.
Version with different ABC label (narrower font among other things) here: Ill Wind – Flashes.
Reissue Edition :
Double- c.d expanded edition on Sunbeam Records (SBR2CD5065), released in 2009
Tracks :
Disc One :
1. Walkin’ And Singin’ (Tom Frankel) – 3:11
2. People Of The Night (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 7:44
3. Little Man (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 4:31
4. Dark World (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 3:45
5. L.A.P.D. (Richard Criggs) – 5:05
6. High Flying Bird (Billy Ed Wheeler) – 4:58
7. Hung Up Chick (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 5:52
8. Sleep (Ken Frankel) – 2:38
9. Full Cycle (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 6:10
All Tracks Recorded In New York, 1968 Produced By Tom WilsonDisc Two :
1. Ill Wind (Ken Frankel) – 2:56
2. All Over Love Is One (Ken Frankel) – 2:26
3. I Can See You (Carey Mann) – 2:55
4. I Tell You I Know (Ken Franke) – 2:51
5. Tomorrow You’ll Come Back (Ken Frankel) – 2:39
6. You’re All I See Now (Carey Mann,  Sandy Darlington) – 2:19
7. Are You Right? (Ken Frankel) – 2:25
8. People Of The Night (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 2:25
9. It’s Your Life (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 2:20
10. Flashes (Richard Griggs) – 3:28
11. The Water Is Wide (Traditional) – 3:35
12. Mauti (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 5:30
13. Waking In The Water (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 3:11
14. 1 And 100 (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 4:31
15. Frosted Summer Drink (Ken, Tom Frankel) – 3:21
Tracks 1-4 are demos made in Terry Hanley’s Studio, Boston, in 1966
Tracks 5-9 are demos made at Capitol Records, NY, in 1967, produced by Dick Weissman
Track 10 is a live recording made at Westborough High School, MA, in 1967
Tracks 11-15 are basement recordings made in Wellesley, Massachusetts in 1968
Ill Wind :
Conny Devanney – Vocals
Ken Frankel – Guitar, Banjo, Harmonica
Richard (Zvonar) Criggs – Guitar, Vocals
Carey Mann – Bass, Vocals
David Kinsman – Drums
With :
Michael Walsh – Bass, Vocal (Disc 2, Tracks 11-15)
Notes :
2-1 to 2-4 are demos made in Terry Hanley’s Studio, Boston, in 1966 
2-5 to 2-9 are demos made at Capitol Records, NY, in 1967
2-10 is a live recording made at Westborough High School, MA, in 1967
2-11 to 2-15 are basement recordings made in Wellesley, MA, in 1968
Lyrics :
There’s a high flyin’ bird, flying way up in the sky
And I wonder if she looks down, as she goes on by?
Well, she’s flying so freely in the sky
Lord, look at me here
I’m rooted like a tree here
Got those sit down
Can’t cry oh Lord, gonna die blues
Now the sun it comes up and lights up the day
And when he gets tired, Lord, he goes on down his way
To the east and to the west He meets God every day
Lord, look at me here
I’m rooted like a tree here
Got those sit down, can’t cry
Oh Lord, gonna die blues
Now I had a woman
Lord, she lived down by the mine
She ain’t never seen the sun
Oh Lord, never stopped crying
Then one day my woman up and died
Lord, she up and died now
Oh Lord, she up and died now, she wanted to die
And the only way to fly is die, die, die
There’s a high flyin’ bird, flying way up in the sky
And I wonder if she looks down as she goes on by?
Well, she’s flying so freely in the sky
Lord, look at me here
I’m rooted like a tree here
Got those sit down, can’t cry
Oh, Lord, gonna die blues
Songwriters: Billy Edd Wheeler
Information about the album/band/track :
“Rockasteria”
In the 1960s a new era of creativity began. The post-WWII values of the 1940s and 50s had begun to show cracks and a new generation, dissatisfied with rigid social boundaries, the Vietnam war and what they perceived as shallow materialism, created a new counter-culture. This change was ripe with opportunities for young musicians, allowing them the freedom to explore new, creative possibilities.
Ill Wind was a result of that perfect storm. The seeds of III Wind took root in 1965 at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts, when Ken Frankel, a biophysics graduate student, met Carey Mann, a math graduate student, and they decided to start a rock band. Multiinstrumentalist Ken, although only 23 at the time, had been playing professionally for 7 years, first in high school in L.A. (as lead guitarist in a successful rock band), and then at U.C. Berkeley on banjo, mandolin, and guitar.
Ken had played in bluegrass and oldtime bands in the San Francisco Bay Area with people such as Jerry Garcia, Robert Hunter, Richard Greene, Sandy Rothman and Rick Shubb, as well as lead guitar in a college rock band that played bars and fraternity parties. Carey Mann was also a young but experienced musician. In high school in Pennsylvania he’d played piano in a Dixieland band, and at MIT he won awards as the guitarist in the school’s highly respected jazz band.
After wonderful experience  with Dick Weissman as a very hands-  on producer, the band  was shocked at Wilson’s unexplained lack of focus in the studio. They were  inexperienced and wanted  a strong producer, but he  spent most of the time reading  the newspaper or talking on the  telephone. Following the hasty atmosphere of the recording, he excluded them from the mixing sessions, which were not done to the band’s taste or satisfaction.
The band had a wonderful cover proposal by a local artist, but ABC insisted that they needed a cover photo in one week, because they wanted to release the album right away. ABC arranged for an uninspired studio photo, and then didn’t release the album for six months. When the first run of 10,000 discs appeared in August 1968, there was a mistake in the pressing process, meaning that ‘High Flying Bird’ had a skip where an ending phrase repeated three times (this was corrected on a subsequent pressing of 2000 copies).
The photos on the back cover were accidentally printed so dark that you couldn’t tell what they were, and ABC didn’t print enough albums to meet demand, so many stores couldn’t obtain them, despite putting in multiple orders.  Nonetheless, despite a lack of promotional activity or reviews, and the backlash caused by the ‘Bosstown hype’, ‘Flashes’  was fairly well-received. Three singles were taken (‘Walking and Singing’ b/w ‘High Flying Bird’, ‘Dark World’ / b/w ‘Walking and Singing  and / finally ‘Dark World’ b/w ‘High “lying Bird’), though most copies were promos.
The album was played often on the radio, especially in New England, the band was paid well for performances, albeit in amounts that (in today’s dollars) would shock contemporary musicians. Ill Wind performed with many well-known acts, including The Who, Fleetwood Mac, The Byrds, Moby Grape, Van Morrison, The Rascals, The Buckingnams and Mitch Ryder. They continued to gig regularly at The Boston Tea Party and started a free music-in the-park series in Cambridge.
They became important leaders of the New England rock scene, and were even recognized on the street. In mid-1968, III Wind was poised to take the next step (whatever that might have been), when Carey announced he was leaving. This was quite a blow, since he was one of the band’s founders. They replaced him with bass player / vocalist Michael Walsh. At the same time, Ken put together a 4-track recording studio in the basement of one of the dormitories where the band was living, consisting of two cheap Sony 2-track reel-to-reel recorders with heads switched around, and some $10 Radio Shack stereo mixers.
The purpose was to make demos of new songs without having to pay for studio time, and perhaps regain control of the band’s destiny from ABC records and Tom Wilson. In 1968, with Michael on bass and vocals, III Wind recorded 5 songs on this makeshift equipment (‘the Wel Tesley Basement Recordings’), but no further record contract resulted. The band broke up following year, when Ken Frankel (who’d married the band’s original singer, Judy Bradbury) moved to Marin County in Northern California, which his friend Jerry Garcia had convinced him was ‘the place to be’ for musicians.
In 1970 the band reformed with all original members except Ken, with Carey rejoining on lead guitar and organ in place of Ken, Conny on vocals, Richard on rhythm guitar, Dave on drums, Michael on bass, and Berred acting as road manager for larger venues. After a few months, Carey quit again and was eventually replaced by Walter Bjorkman. In this form the band carried on doing mostly covers for nearly a year. Richard left in 1971, to be replaced eventually with Bryant Thayer on piano.
In this configuration, with Conny and Dave as the only remaining members from the ABC album, and with Michael still on bass, the band probably played more performances than ever before, but finally dissolved for good in 1973. The surviving members of III Wind remain in touch with each other, and all but Ken still live in New England. He became a successful real estate entrepreneur in Northern California, and owned and ran a major music venue, The Cotati Cabaret, in the 1980s, when he also formed the classical group The Electric Guitar Quartet. Ken received his Ph.D in Psychology, and is currently undertaking psychology research. He continues to perform professionally in Marin County, California.
Carey Mann recorded an album with Dirty Johns Hot Dog Stand in 1970, and played in a variety of bands on the club circuit through 1975. He had always modified his instruments, but is most proud of completely rebuilding his Hammond organ into a different configuration, even adding semi synthesizer stops. After he quit playing music full-time, he developed a successful career in computer technology and still lives in Massachusetts, where ne continues to play rock professionally.
Conny Devanney owned and ran the well known booking agency CoCo (for ‘Conny Company’) for many years. She has never stopped singing professionally, and has been the lead singer with a Dixieland band and  in various bands doing jazz standards, including an 18-piece big band, and her own 7-piece band, with whom she still performs.
After the final version of III Wind broke up, David Kinsman played with John Lincoln Wright & The Sourmash Boys in 1974, but left the music business in 1975 and moved to Maine. There he raised a family and started the successful bicycle parts company Downeast Bicycle, which he ran for 20 years, before selling the company and retiring^ Richard (Zvonar) Griggs received his Ph.D. in composition and music technology in 1982, and worked extensively both as a musician and intermedia artist, before his death in 2005.
He created the III Wind website, http://www.lll-Wind.com, and was the driving force behind the creation of this CD. Michael Walsh continued to be involved in music for over 30 years, working mostly out of Boston, but also Nashville and California. He played with many notable performers, including Jonathan Edwards, Tom Rush, Livingston Taylor, Vassar Clements, James Montgomery, John Pousette-Dart, Andy Pratt, Robin Lane, Mark Spoelstra, Bill Stains and David Mallet. He currently lives in Vermont.
Judy (Bradbury) Frankel embarked on  a successful solo singing career after an amicable divorce from Ken in 1989. She was internationally known as a singer and collector of Jewish Sephardic music. Judy lived in San Francisco for 30 years prior to her death in 2008. To learn more, visit http://www.JudyFrankel.org.
Berred Ouellette became a successful recording engineer. He has worked on productions in England, France, Venezuela, and 49 of the 50 United States. He has toured with and / or recorded many famous performers, including Livingston Taylor, Tony Williams, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Aerosmith, Buddy Guy & Junior Wells, The J. Geils Sana, JethroTull, The Beach Bovs, Linda Ronstadt, America and dozens of national jazz acts, and continues to do so. He currently lives in Massachusetts.
“AllMusic”
The psychedelic group Ill Wind released just one album, and even though it was for a fairly big label (ABC), it was indeed ill-distributed and heard by few at the time. Like a number of late-’60s bands from Boston, Ill Wind suffered from the lack of a consistent musical direction and uneven material and production that didn’t make the most of the bandmembers’ assets, though there was some instrumental and vocal talent in the group. Their album, Flashes, was a tense, brooding stew of folk-rock and freaky psychedelia that didn’t quite coalesce, with the stirring, assertive vocals of Conny Devaney the best ingredient. Although it was produced by one of the best producers in 1960s rock, Tom Wilson (who had worked with Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, the Mothers of Invention, and others), it didn’t do much, and the Ill Wind disbanded at the end of 1968, though the group re-formed for a few months in 1970.
“Psychedelicized”

The band was started in 1965 in Cambridge, MA, by two graduates – Ken Frankel (biophysics) and Carey Mann (math), who were joined by folk duo of Judy Bradbury and Norm Gan. Around 1965/66 the music scene drifted from the pure entertainment of R&R and beat towards rock and psychedelia, and “Ill Wind” perfectly fit in it with their unique mixture of psychedelia and acid-folk. By that time the original singer Judy Bradbury (who helped to shape the sound of the band) quit to be replaced by another ex-folky – Conny Devanney – a singer p a r e x c e l l e n c e with crystal clear voice.

The band went through hard times (they couldn’t get jobs because they played their own songs and refused to play covers, and they looked and dressed too “hippie” to be generally accepted). However, “Ill Wind” was gigging non-stop in the college circuit and built a solid following, finally becoming a resident act at the “Boston Tea Party” (which was New England’s response to the rock shrine of “Fillmore” in San Francisco). “Ill Wind” recorded a few demos for Capitol (before being dropped by the label) and ended up signed by ABC. In 1968 “Ill Wind” had played with the wide range of top musicians from Chuck Berry to The Who, thus there were many fans waiting for their debut album – which was properly delayed by label, misproduced, artwork ruined, and the label didn’t manufacture enough copies to satisfy the demands.

The original recordings of “Ill Wind” have been heavily counterfeited on both vinyl and CDs by Flash, Afterglow and Akarma. There is however an oustanding legitimate re-issue by “Sunbeam” on 2 CDs, featuring 9 original songs recorded in 1968 starting with bluegrass ballad “Walkin’ and Singin’” and erupting into psychedelic mini-symphony “People of the Night”. The second CD has 15 tracks recorded in 1966 and 1967, plus 5 songs recorded in 1968. The set comes with an excellent well-researched booklet and rare photos.

“Music Museum of New England”

Boston-based Ill Wind was a familiar band on the college and teen dance circuit in New England and New York during the sixties and early seventies.  The first incarnation featured Ken Frankel on lead guitar, Richard Griggs on guitar, Carey Mann on bass, local folksinger, Judy Bradbury, on lead vocals and Dave Kinsman on drums. The band originally mixed folk/rock and bluegrass. As the band evolved into psychedelia and blues, Judy left the band and was replaced by Conny Devanney who had been singing in New York City and Jersey Shore clubs. The band had three lead singers, three songwriters and their songs started to feature complex three part harmonies and long instrumental jams.

The first gigs were at college mixers and frat parties in the Boston/Cambridge area. After recording a demo tape at Hanley Studios in Medford, the band got their first gig out of the Boston area at a CYO dance in Stoneham. The young kids were so enthusiastic about the new sound that Ill Wind began playing at other CYO and teen dances around New England.

Soon the band attracted the attention of booking agencies and started playing colleges around   New England and New York at the time when colleges had large entertainment budgets. They also started playing at the Boston Tea Party, where they made regular appearances, plus many of the big ballrooms where the big bands of the 30s and 40s played. The band was working full time now and brought in Ken’s brother, Tom, to help manage the band and do sound levels at performances. Soon after that Richard “Berred” Ouellette joined the band as road manager. Over the years, Ill Wind performed with many well known bands including The Who, Fleetwood Mac, The Byrds, Moby Grape, Van Morrison, The Rascals, The Buckinghams, Jethro Tull, The Youngbloods, Mitch Ryder, Vanilla Fudge and also backed Chuck Berry.

In 1967, the band recorded five songs for Capitol Records at their studios in New York, produced by Dick Weisman, formally of the Journeymen. Although months of negotiations ensued, no record contract was signed and the songs were never released. The band started working with the William Morris Agency and was booked on a West Coast tour.

Upon returning from California, the band spent two weeks playing on Long Island and New York City where they met Tom Wilson. Tom had just formed his own production company after producing albums for Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel and The Mothers of Invention. The band signed with ABC Records and in 1968 the album, Flashes, produced by Wilson, was released as well as a single, “In My Dark World” b/w “High Flyiing Bird”. The respected British music magazine Mojo noted that the album included “some of the finest psychedelia conceivable”

Unfortunately, ABC did not press enough albums to meet demand, and many stores couldn’t stock them. Nonetheless, Flashes was fairly well received and was played often on the radio across the country including WBCN and was “pick of the week” in several markets.

The original band broke up in 1969 and reformed in 1970 with Conny Devanney, Dave Kinsman, Michael Walsh on bass, Walter Bjorkman (formerly of Cloud and Swallow) on lead guitar and Bryant Thayer on piano. Featuring Conny’s strong vocals and Walter’s blues guitar, Ill Wind was a big draw at colleges and concert clubs until disbanding in 1973.

Ironically, more has been written about Ill Wind since they broke up. Richard, Walter, Judy and Tom have died. The other members reside in New England and California.

In 2009, the British label, Sunbeam Records, re-released Flashes as a double CD and double vinyl album that included the five previously unreleased cuts from Capitol as well as other earlier recordings.

Photos about the album/band/track :

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Album cover photo (front)

ILL WIND FLASHES 1 (2)

Ill Wind Band’s Photos

Conny Devanney (Singer)

Image result for ill wind band

Related image

ILL WIND BAND 1 (2)

Image may contain: 6 people, people sitting

Ill Wind2

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, tree, plant, outdoor and nature

Ill Wind4

Links about the album/band/track :

Ill Wind – “High Flying Bird” Video file link on YouTube

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Ill Wind Band’s Page on Spotify

Ill Wind Band’s Page on Discogs

Ill Wind Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Ill Wind Band’s Page on Facebook

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Full Album Download Link on The Free Spiritual Be-In Blog

Ill Wind – “Flashes” Full Album Download Link on Rock Archeologia 60-70 Blog

Ill Wind – “Flashes” List on eBay

Ill Wind Band’s Page on Apple Music

 

 

7-inch Singles/E.P.S Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s The Freeborne – “Images”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s 

Bosstown Sound (Boston Sound)

The Freeborne (Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.)

“Images” (written by Nick Carstoiu, Mike Spiros) B’ Side single (A’ Side single “Land Of Diana”), released on Monitor Records (45-1806) in 1967

A1 track (opening track) included on the album “Peak Impressions”

Released on Monitor Records (MPS(C) 607) in 1968

Line-up/Credits :

Freeborne :

Lew Lipson – Drums, Percussion
Nick Carstoiu – Guitar, Recorder, Cello, Piano, Vocals
Bob Margolin – Lead Guitar
Mike Spiros – Organ, Piano, Chimes, Trumpet, Percussion
Dave Codd – Harpsichord, Percussion, Bass, Vocals

Artwork [Cover Art] – Richard Smith (18)

Drums, Percussion – Lew Lipson

Engineer – Don Puluse, Lou Waxman

Lead Guitar – Bob Margolin

Lead Vocals – Dave  (tracks: B3, B4), Nick (tracks: A1 to A3, B1, B2, B5)

Mixed By, Edited By – Tim Geelan

Organ, Piano, Chimes, Bells [Belltree], Trumpet, Percussion – Mike Spiros

Producer – Barry Richards

Vocals, Guitar, Recorder, Cello, Piano – Nick Carstoiu

Vocals, Recorder, Harpsichord, Percussion, Bass – Dave Codd

Written-By – B. Greenglass (tracks: A3), B. Margolin (tracks: B2), D. Codd (tracks: A5, B1, B3, B4), J. Babbitt (tracks: A4, B1), M. Spiros  (tracks: A1 to A4, B1, B5), N. Carstoiu (tracks: A1 to A3, A5, B1, B5)

Track-List :

1. Images (Nick Carstoiu, Mike Spiros) – 3:38
2. Land Of Diana (Mike Spiros, Nick Carstoiu) – 2:56
3. Visions Of My Own (M. Spiros, N. Carstoiu, B. Greenglass) – 4:10
4. Sadly Acknowledged (J.Babbitt, M. Spiros) – 1:27
5. Peak Impressions And Thoughts (Dave Codd, N. Carstoiu) – 6:56
6. Yellow Sky (J.Babbitt, M. Spiros, D. Codd, N. Carstoiu) – 2:23
7. Hurtin’ Kind Of Woman (Bob Margolin) – 4:24
8. Inside People (Dave Codd) – 2:50
9. A New Song For Orestes (Dave Codd) – 3:37
10.But I Must Return To Frenzy (N. Carstoiu, M. Spiros) – 9:06

The Freeborne’s sole album is, in common with the mildly better-known ’60s Boston psychedelic bands who comprised the Bosstown Sound, something of a goulash of then-trendy underground rock crosscurrents. It’s not quite a ghoulish goulash, but it’s not too tasty either, though they come up with some nice minor-key vocal harmonies. The record sounds like it was steeped in many listening sessions to the most popular psychedelic records of 1967, particularly the Doors’ first album, Jefferson Airplane’s Surrealistic Pillow, and the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper. Also at work are some jazz, classical, and raga influences, albeit of the sort by young musicians just getting to grips with those forms. The flaws of the album are that there aren’t outstanding songs, and that the mood shifts seem more like an attempt to be as eclectic as possible than they do like genuinely well-thought-out compositional statements. The overall spacey, haunting feel of the record sometimes verges on self-conscious creepiness. It’s embroidered by novel use of recorder, cello, harpsichord, and trumpet from time to time, though electric organ in the mold of the Doors or Country Joe & the Fish is more prominent, as is California psychedelia-influenced guitar. The CD reissue on Distortions adds bonus tracks of marginal worth: the mono 45 version of “Images,” and a “stereo mix #2” of “Land of Diana.”

The Freeborne were a youthful Boston-based psych outfit whose five members, despite their tender years, all had considerable experience of playing a wide range of styles in earlier combos. Adapting their name from the movie Born Free and discovering the freewheeling creative delights of LSD, they signed to Monitor in early ’67 and concocted a set of highly psychedelic originals which were laid down at A&R Studios in NYC. Peak Impressions sold only modestly, probably because of a dilatory campaign of live appearances to support it.
After the lukewarm reception afforded it the original Freeborne folded, though later incarnations with fewer or no original members did tramp the second-division concert circuit for a few years afterwards. Inexplicably, given their obvious talent, only guitarist Bob Margolin seems to have had an appreciable later career, playing in Muddy Waters’s backing band through most of the 70s and subsequently with blues-based outfits under his own name. There’s precious little documentation on the band anywhere, but the excellent It’s Psychedelic Baby website features an informative career interview with Margolin which includes insights into the Freeborne.
I was expecting this one to be good, having read complimentary accounts of it in both Fuzz Acid And Flowers and The Acid Archives. I was even more impressed when it arrived and the CD remaster proved to have been archived by Smithsonian Folkways whose estimable moniker now adorns the Digipak. And this is indeed an impressive collection. It’s notable for the virtuosity of the musicians whose ages ranged from just 17 to 19 and yet three of whom were precociously-talented multi-instrumentalists: and we’re talking orchestral hardware here – pianos, harpsichords, cellos, trumpets, flutes and recorders – not just standard rock frontline.
It’s also remarkable for the variety and creativity of the material; one reviewer commented that there seemed to be too many ideas to fit into a single album, and I can see his point. Youthful enthusiasm ensured that nothing was left out and nothing left understated, and most tracks move through bewildering sequences of keys, metres, instrumentation and vocal stylings that give their definitively psych outlines a distinctly progressive edge. This is one to listen to right through several times to get the whole effect.
The lyrics are mostly generic trippy psych nonsense, but the music is invigoratingly original. Leading off with a soulful piano riff, the opening “Images” offers Byrdsy harmonies, pulsating bass and rippling guitar scales before switching into a baroque piano and trumpet waltz. “Land Of Diana” prefigures 70s prog, starting as a jazzy 5/4 and shifting into a bluesy shuffle after distinctly proggy organ and guitar episodes. “Visions Of My Own” sets a homely acoustic guitar and trilling flute against what sounds like a chorus of PDQ Bach’s infamous Dill Piccolos before mutating without warning into a military snare-drum march. “Peak Impressions And Thoughts” is all Piper-era Floyd with swirling Farfisa, spiky Syd-style guitar, fluid bass and crashing cymbals building to a furious final crescendo. “Yellow Sky” is definitive Britsike with wah-ed guitars, churchy keyboards and lots of tempo changes.
The most conventional track, “Hurtin’ Kind Of Woman”, is a soft blues shuffle with jazzy guitar and energetic Hammond work comparable with the best of Brian Auger. Despite the multifarious musical landscapes visited here, only on the last two tracks does the band outstretch itself, with the ridiculously sombre harpsichord and cello, sub-Beach Boys harmonies and cod-poetic spoken voice outro of “A New Song For Orestes” and the unnecessarily lengthy and self-indulgent cod-classical piano/trumpet cadenzas and duet of the closing “But I Must Return To Frenzy”.
The Freeborne – “Images” Single photo (B’ Side)
THE FREEBORNE IMAGES 1
The Freeborne – “Peak Impressions” Album cover photo (front)
THE FREEBORNE PEAK IMPRESSIONS 1 (2)
The Freeborne (along with The Velvet Underground), Boston Tea Party, Poster, 1967
THE FREEBORNE POSTER PHOTO 1

 

Hard Rock/Progressive Rock/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks) Deep Purple – “The Shield”

Hard Rock/Progressive/Psychedelic Rock U.K. 1960s (Tracks)

Deep Purple (Hertford, Hertfordshire, U.K.)

“The Shield” (written by Lord, Blackmore, Evans) B1 track included on the album “The Book Of Taliesyn” 

Released on Tetragrammaton Records ( T-107) in the U.S.A. (October 1968),  on Harvest ‎(SHVL 751) in the U.K. (1969)

Line-up/Credits :

Rod Evans / lead vocals
Ritchie Blackmore / lead guitar
Jon Lord / Hammond organ, backing vocals, string arrangements (6)
Nick Simper / bass, backing vocals
Ian Paice / drums

Production :

  • Derek Lawrence – producer, mixing
  • Barry Ainsworth – engineer
  • Peter Mew – restoring and remastering at Abbey Road Studios, London (2000)

Track Listing :

1. Listen, Learn, Read On (4:04)
2. Wring That Neck (also known as “Hard Road”) (5:13)
3. Kentucky Woman (Neil Diamond cover) (4:44)
4. Exposition / We Can Work It Out (Beatles cover) (7:07)
5. Shield (6:06)
6. Anthem (6:31)
7. River Deep, Mountain High (Ike & Tina Turner cover) (10:12)

Total time 44:00

Bonus tracks on 2000 remaster:
8. Oh No No No (Studio outtake Dec ’68) (4:25)
9. It’s All Over (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (4:14)
10. Hey Bop A Re Bop (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (3:31)
11. Wring That Neck (BBC Top Gear, Jan ’69) (4:42)
12. Playground (Remixed instrumental studio outtake, Aug ’68) (4:29)

Lyrics :

Mama plays a queen on the hill built on a dream
While the children play in the field
Papa smokes the pipe of a sweet and better life
But how strong is the shield?
Can peace be found on the carpet above ground
Where sky is forever blue
So let it pass baby now, the slow and riding cloud
Which may take me from you
Many things a man can lose
His self, his rights, his views
But never his heart or his love
So take this hand of mine and climb baby, climb
To the hill up above
Now you can play a queen on the hill built on a dream
While our children play in the field
I can smoke the pipe of a sweet and better life
And trust in the strength of the shield
So trust in you love, and Lucy of above
And let light pass like a wheel
Don’t take the chance of life’s hectic dance
Kiss the strength of the shield
The seeker will be found by the looker on the ground
And to his wish he will yield
Fate will have it’s word, of course
(Think this line is wrong)
And time will change its course
And hold the strength of the shield
Songwriters: Jon Lord / Ritchie Blackmore / Rod Evans
Shield” or “The Shield” is a Blackmore/Lord/Evans composition. The fifth track on the band’s second album runs to 5 minutes 59 seconds, and has a distinctly psychedelic feel to it. It appears to be a song about family life, philosophising, etc, and some sources include the line “So trust in you love, and Lucy of above” in the lyrics, which appears to be a reference to “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”. As this well known Beatles track was released the year before The Book Of Taliesyn, this is plausible, however, this line is actually a mondegreen, a misheard lyric.

Founded in Hertford, UK in 1968 – Hiatus between 1976-1984 – Still active as of 2018

The archetypal hard rock band, hugely influential, and still alive and well after almost 40 years, DEEP PURPLE were formed in Hertford (England) in 1968. Their earliest line-up (known as Mark I) featured guitarist Ritchie BLACKMORE, drummer Ian Paice (who was to be the only constant member in all the numerous incarnations of the band), keyboardist Jon LORD, bassist Nick Simper and vocalist Rod Evans. Their first album, “Shades of Deep Purple”, included a cover of JOE SOUTH’s “Hush”, which became a big hit in the USA. The following two efforts were definitely more progressive in tone, especially their third, self-titled album, which saw Lord’s masterful, classically-influenced use of the B3 Hammond organ steal the limelight.

In 1969, Evans and Simper were fired, to be replaced by two former Episode Six members, bassist Roger Glover and legendary vocalist Ian Gillan, who had also starred in the lead role in the original version of Andrew Lloyd-Webber and Tim Rice’s “Jesus Christ Superstar”. This line-up, which is widely known as DEEP PURPLE Mark II, gave the band international renown – even though their first album, Lord’s pet project “Concerto for Group and Orchestra” (recorded with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra) was poorly received.

With Gillan and Glover on board, DEEP PURPLE recorded a series of extremely successful albums, which saw them blend the progressive stylings of their first three albums with an increasingly harder-edged approach, like 1970′ ground-breaking “In Rock”. Their sound featured lengthy, dazzling duels between Lord’s Hammond and Blackmore’s Stratocaster, punctuated by Gillan’s sky-high screams – nowhere better embodied than in their stunning, 1972 live album, “Made in Japan”. In the same year, they released “Machine Head”, one of the essential rock albums of all time, which featured the seminal riff of “Smoke on the Water” (inspired by a true episode happened during the recording of the album itself in Montreux, Switzerland), as well as other classics such as “Highway Star” and “Space Truckin'”.

Unfortunately, ego clashes and differences in musical direction caused the departure of both Gillan and Glover, who were replaced by an already established musician (also possessed of awesome pipes), former TRAPEZE bassist and vocalist Glenn Hughes, and an unknown singer from North Yorkshire, David Coverdale, whose deep, bluesy voice was distinctly different from Gillan’s high-pitched wail. The first Mark III album, “Burn”, released in 1974, ranks amongst the band’s best efforts, with the furious, barnstorming title-track quickly becoming another mainstay of their live performances.

However, Hughes’s leanings towards funk and soul clashed with Blackmore’s own musical orientation, which led to the latter’s split from the band immediately after the release of “Stormbringer”. He was replaced by American whizzkid Tommy Bolin, formerly with JAMES GANG, who had also played on Billy Cobham’s ground-breaking first solo album, “Spectrum”. Unfortunately, Bolin was a drug addict, while Hughes had also begun his descent into alcoholism and cocaine addiction. The band’s only Mark IV album, 1975’s “Come Taste the Band”, is a highly underrated masterpiece of funk-tinged hard rock. It also signalled the dissolution of the band, after Bolin’s tragic death of a heroin overdose in 1976.

It seemed to be the end for DEEP PURPLE, and as a matter of fact it was for nearly eight years – until the five original MK II members got together and decided to give it a go once again. The result was 1984’s excellent “Perfect Strangers”, a true return to form whose magnificent, Eastern-tinged title track has since become one of the band’s undisputed classics. However, the idyll was not fated to last: 1987’s “The House of Blue Light” was a much weaker effort, and the tensions between Blackmore and Gillan resurfaced, causing the latter to leave the band. He was replaced by Blackmore’s former RAINBOW sidekick, American vocalist Joe Lynn Turner, whose presence on 1990’s “Slaves and Masters” album gave the band’s sound a definitely AOR slant that put off many of their earlier fans. In 1992, Gillan rejoined the band in order to record the aptly-titled “The Battle Rages On”; however, during the tour in support of the album his conflict with Blackmore got out of hand, and the guitarist left – this time, never to return.

DEEP PURPLE managed to complete the tour by enlisting the help of guitar wonder JOE SATRIANI, who nevertheless declined their offer to join the band permanently. They found Blackmore’s replacement in yet another American, former DIXIE DREGS and KANSAS guitarist Steve MORSE. A legend in his own right, Morse brought fresh ideas to the band, as well as a much more relaxed approach to personal relationships. The new line-up managed to record two albums, “Purpendicular” (1996) and “Abandon” (1998), before, in 2003, founding member Jon Lord left the band in order to rest from constant touring and dedicate himself to his own musical projects. His replacement was found in a veteran of the British rock scene, former Colosseum II keyboardist Don Airey. This new version of the band is still active and touring in the 21st century. Their latest album, “Rapture of the Deep” (2005), is certainly one of their best efforts since they got back together in 1984. Even in their early sixties, the members of DEEP PURPLE still have a lot to offer to the rock world.

The Book of Taliesyn is the second studio album by English rock band Deep Purple, recorded only three months after Shades of Deep Purple and released by Tetragrammaton Records in October 1968, just before their first US tour. The name for the album was taken from the 14th-century Book of Taliesin.

The structure of the album is similar to that of their debut, with four original songs and three rearranged covers, although the tracks are longer, the arrangements more complex and the sound more polished than on Shades of Deep Purple. The music style is a mix of psychedelic rock, progressive rock and hard rock, with several inserts of classical music arranged by the band’s keyboard player Jon Lord.

Deep Purple’s American record label aimed for a hippie audience, which was very influential in the US at the time, but the chart results of the album and singles were not as high as expected. This setback did not hinder the success of the three-month US tour, when the band played in many important venues and festivals and received positive feedback from audiences and the press. Deep Purple were still an underground band which played in small clubs and colleges in the United Kingdom, largely ignored by the media and the public. British record company EMI did not release The Book of Taliesyn until June 1969, on the new underground prog rock sub-label Harvest Records, and the album did not chart. Even the release of the new single “Emmaretta” and new dates in their home country in the summer of 1969 did not increase album sales or the popularity of Deep Purple in the UK. Perception of the album changed later years, when it received more favourable reviews.

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Album photo (B Side)

DEEP PURPLE THE BOOK OF TALIESYN 1

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Album cover photo (front)

DEEP PURPLE THE BOOK OF TALIESYN 2 (2)

Deep Purple – “The Shield” Video file link on YouTube

Deep Purple – “The Book Of Taliesyn” Full Album Video file link on YouTube

Deep Purple Band’s Homepage

Deep Purple – “The Highway Star” Band’s Fan Club Page

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Facebook

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Twitter

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Spotify

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Discogs

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Deezer

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Setlist Fm

Deep Purple Band’s Appreciation Society Page

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Apple Music

Deep Purple Band’s Page on Google Music Store

Deep Purple Band’s Page/Discography/Full Albums Download Links on Muro Do Classic Rock Blog

Deep Purple Band’s Page on ProgArchives

 

 

 

 

 

Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) Clear Light – “Night Sounds Loud”

Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks)

Clear Light ( Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.)

“Night Sounds Loud” (written by Lubahn) B5 track (closing track) included on the album “Clear Light” 

Released on Electra Records (EKL-4011), on a gold/tan Elektra label, with a special inner sleeve showing a picture of the band in black and white. This Mono version of the release was housed in the Stereo version sleeve (sometimes with a sticker indicating mono). Therefore the back cover still shows the stereo cat.nr.: ”EKS-74011”.  

Year of Release : 1967

It was also an A Side single (B’ Side single “How Many Days Have Passed?”), released on Elektra Records (EKSN 45027) in 1968

The Doors had just released their debut album, to no immediate acclaim, in January 1967 when their label, Elektra, signed another Los Angeles band, the Brain Train, with a mounting local buzz and a unique strength in the engine room: two drummers. It was, ironically, the beginning of the end. The group, soon renamed Clear Light, became an obsession for the Doors’ producer, Paul Rothchild; he became the new group’s producer and its fiercely controlling manager as well, to the point of bringing in a new singer for Clear Light’s Elektra debut and alienating pretty much everyone else. By September 1968, what was left of Clear Light went dark; a second LP was never finished.

But Clear Light, issued in October 1967, is an Elektra golden-era classic. It was nearly a hit, too. The band’s thoroughly gothic extension of folk singer Tom Paxton’s jaunty take on government surveillance, “Mr. Blue,” went into high rotation on free-form-FM radio, driven by the parallel, rolling doom of drummers Michael Ney and Dallas Taylor (also of Crosby, Stills & Nash). Clear Light also excelled at tighter dramas like “Black Roses” and “With All in Mind,” combining the demented-circus flair of L.A. psychedelia with the dirty-blues force of garage rock. This reissue of Clear Light is an expanded celebration with the single the band recorded as the Brain Train – the tracks that landed them the Elektra deal – and strong outtakes including the bracing fuzz-and-reverb B side “She’s Ready to Be Free,” featured in the 1967 film The President’s Analyst (an absurdist romp starring James Coburn as an acid-fried White House shrink that is worth seeing – and not just for Clear Light’s cameo performance).

Rothchild all but admitted on the back cover of Clear Light that he never truly captured what I imagine was the massive, live force of those two drummers: “To fully appreciate the spectacular sound of double drumming on Clear Light, play this record at high volume.” Turning it up helps a lot. You also hear everything else that made Clear Light special – for too short a time.

Clear Light was a folk-rock/psych-rock group from LA that released one LP off Elektra in 1967, famously known for including two drummers, one of them being Dallas Taylor of CSNY and Manassas fame. Paul Rothchild produced the LP, which explains why the recording sessions were fraught with tension and negativity. The group was masterminded by guitarist/vocalist Bob Seal, bass player Doug Lubahn, and lead vocalist Cliff De Young. Prior to Clear Light the band had been known as the Brain Train. Seal felt a name change was appropriate to coincide with the release of a newly recorded debut single, “Black Roses.” Seal decided on Clear Light, a concept he had come across in his readings of Eastern philosophy, a name also shared by a potent brand of LSD.

“Black Roses,” written by Wolfgang Dios, was released in September of 1967. It was a great hard charging folk-rock single with an acid tinged guitar solo that deserved to sell much better than it did. Black Roses appeared on the group’s only full length platter, released in late 1967. Many psych fans are divided when it comes to the Clear Light LP but I think it’s a good one. Maybe not a true classic on par with Love’s Forever Changes or Moby Grape’s debut but still a very good LP without any weak tracks. The band tries nearly everything within a 2 to 3 minute pop song context, loading the songs with good quirky ideas and great guitar solos (check out “Think Again”). Some tracks like “They Who Have Nothing” and the baroque “Ballad of Freddie & Larry” bear a strong Doors and Love influence, but this makes sense considering these were all Elektra groups. Other songs like the outstanding fuzz guitar psychedelia of “Sand” and the trippy “Night Sounds Loud” are more original and hinted at a strong future for the group. The former track features some great organ and spiraling acid guitar interplay. The album’s most famous track, a cover of Tom Paxton‘s “Mr. Blue,” sounds dated today with its spoken word dialogue, although, even this song is oddly appealing in its own way and definitely still considered a highlight.

Rothchild’s iron fist policy coupled with the lack of commercial success led to Clear Light’s demise, shortly after the release of this solid album. Not everyone will like this record because of its eccentric nature but it really is a crime that Clear Light was unable to release a followup to this debut. A very worthy release from a talented, accomplished California group.

 1966, The Brain Train formed and was managed by Sunset Strip hipster Bud Mathis. They recorded one single – “Black Roses”, written by Wolfe Dios – before changing their name to Clear Light and signing to Elektra Records. Guitarist Bob Seal felt the name should be changed to coincide with the single. Clear Light shared its name with a potent form of LSD, although Seal states the name came from his studies of Eastern philosophy. The Doors’ producer Paul A. Rothchild took over management of the band.

The core members of Clear Light were Bob Seal, lead guitarist and vocals, Robbie “The Werewolf” Robison, rhythm guitar and vocals, Doug Lubahn bass and vocals, Dallas Taylor drums, and Michael Ney on an atypical second set of drums. The original line-up was featured in the 1967 motion picture The President’s Analyst, with Barry McGuire cast as their leader and vocalist. They soon added Cliff De Young on lead vocals and this is the version of the band seen on their only album cover. However, sometime during the recording process, often described as “brutal”, Paul Rothchild was not happy with Robison’s guitar playing skills and pressured the group to remove him – he was replaced by keyboard player Ralph Schuckett.

In what has been called the band’s finest hour, drunken customers in a Park Avenue club heckled them so brutally that Ralph Schuckett, the usually gentle organist, hurled a few choice words back at them. The band walked off the stage, retired to the Albert Hotel, and woke up in the morning to find that they had become underground heroes …

Paul Rothchild then pressured the other members of the band to fire Bob Seal”. Seal was replaced by ex-Fug Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar; Cliff De Young was soon to follow, and after having started work on a second album the group disbanded in 1968.

Side One

  • Black Roses – (Clear Light, Wolfgang Dios) – this has most of the psychedelic motifs: urgent vocals, trippy guitars, change of pace interludes and it is very catchy.
  • Sand – (Douglas Lubahn) – this is in the style i associate with English pschedelica. A thumping back beat , dark obscure lyrics, jazzy organ, a strident vocal, and an overall sense of doom. Bob Seal does lead vocal here.
  • A Child’s Smile – (Clear Light, Michael Ney) –  a gentle psych lullaby.
  • Street Singer – (Greg Copeland, Steve Noonan) – released by singer songwriter Greg Noonan on his self-titled album for Elektra (1968). “Street Singer” here it sounds like proto slow grind metal ( a little like early Black Sabbath). Certainly it is a heavy psych track. The doom is heavy (and obvious): “The old organ grinder has just gone insane and his monkey lies dead, choked to death on its chain”)
  • The Ballad of Freddie and Larry – (Cliff De Young, Ralph Schuckett) – another heavy one.
  • With All in Mind – (Bob Seal) – a bit more optimistic in tone and quite catchy though still heavy handed, musically and lyrically. Bob Seal does lead vocal here.

Side Two

  • Mr. Blue – (Tom Paxton) – Originally (?) released by folk singer songwriter Tom Paxton on his fourth album “Morning Again”  from 1968. A theatrical piece which isn’t great but is certainly memorable.
  • Think Again – (Clear Light, Douglas Lubahn) – light sunshine psych (though still quite dark by those standards)
  • They Who Have Nothing – (Bob Seal) – more gentle psych with guitar breaks, harmonised vocals and many asides. A little like contemporaries the Nazz.
  • How Many Days Have Passed – (Bob Seal) – folkie psych. The questioning (and accusatory) lyrics are perfect for the time.
  • Night Sounds Loud – (Douglas Lubahn) – another great example of a psych number with typically obscure lyrics and oxymoronic words … “night sounds loud”.
  • Personnel: Bass Guitar – Douglas Lubahn / Drums – Dallas Taylor  / Drums, Percussion – Michael Ney / Guitar – Bob Seal / Lead Vocals – Cliff De Young / Organ, Piano, Celesta – Ralph Schuckett / Producer – Paul A. Rothchild
  • Cliff de Young left the band to do acting. He was in the Broadway productions of “Hair” (1972) and (starred in) “Sticks and Bones”. He starred in the made for television movies, “The Night That Panicked America”(1975), “The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case”(1976),”The 3,000 Mile Chase “(1977) and the unsuccessful TV series “Sunshine” (1975) as well as doing leads, “Shock Treatment” (1981) and supports in feature films including “Blue Collar”(1978), “The Hunger”(1983), “Reckless” (1984), “Protocol” (1984),  “Flight of the Navigator”(1986), “F/X” (1986), “Glory”(1989), “The Craft” (1996) and “Road to Nowhere” (2010). He released a self-titled solo album on MCA in 1973.

Tracks :

1. Black Roses (Clear Light, Dios) – 2:09
2. Sand (Douglas Lubahn) – 2:38
3. A Child’s Smile (Clear Light, Michael Ney) – 1:37
4. Street Singer (Greg Copeland, Steve Noonan) – 3:17
5. The Ballad Of Freddie And Larry (Cliff De Young, Ralph Schuckett) – 1:56
6. She’s Ready To Be Free (Clear Light) – 1:58
7. With All In Mind (Bob Seal) – 2:58
8. Mr. Blue (Tom Paxton) – 6:25
9. Think Again (Clear Light, Douglas Lubahn) – 1:37
10.They Who Have Nothing (Bob Seal) – 2:34
11.How Many Days Have Passed (Bob Seal) – 2:24
12.Night Sounds Loud (Douglas Lubahn) – 2:26

Clear Light :

Cliff De Young – Vocals
Bob Seal – Guitar, Vocals
Douglas Lubahn – Bass
Ralph Schuckett – Keyboards
Dallas Taylor – Drums
Michael Ney – Drums

Lyrics :

As I stand here in this wonderland
I see you flying
Fleeing from the burning rain

From a silver cloud shimmering… the echoing world of unreality
Creeps into my racing mind… and the cloud fluctuates
Evenly

My voice explodes into distant rumbling thunder… splashed in among the colors of thought
The illusive light of knowledge ever closer
And the cloud fluctuates evenly

Now slowly fading my cities in the sky
Until once again that cloud… floats by… by

Clear Light – “Clear Light” Album cover photo (front)

CLEAR LIGHT 1 (2)

Clear Light – “Night Sounds Loud” Single photo (A’ Side)

CLEAR LIGHT NIGHT SOUNDS LOUD SINGLE 1

Clear Light – “Night Sounds Loud” Video file link on YouTube

Clear Light Band’s Page on Spotify

Clear Light – Band’s Page on Apple Music

Clear Light – “Clear Light” Full Album Playlist on YouTube

Clear Light Band’s Page on Discogs

Clear Light Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

Clear Light Band’s Page/Full Album Download Link on Rockasteria Blog

Clear Light Band’s Interview on It’s A Psychedelic Baby Magazine Blog

Clear Light – “Clear Light” Full Album Download Link on Old Rock News Blog