The Odds & Ends – “Never Learn” (1966)

Band : The Odds & Ends 

Country Of Origin : U.S.A.

Track : “Never Learn” (7-inch Single), written by M. Marotta, S. Prosen

7-inch Single : A’ Side Single “Never Learn”, B’ Side Single “(Hey Little Girl) Before You Go”

Label : Red Bird Records (RB 10-083)

Date/Year Of Release : September 1966

Category/Music Genres :  Rock, U.S.A., 1960s (A’ Side Singles)

The Odds & Ends – “Never Learn” A’ Side Single

Video on YouTube

The Odds & Ends – ” (Hey Little Girl) Before You Go” B’ Side Single

Video on YouTube

The Odds & Ends – ” Never Learn” 

Lyrics 

Well I tried so very hard to please you
Yet you never learned
The secret of my love is easy, easy to learn
You can see the real me and how I feel
To be true love takes two, now we must part

Never learn!
No, no, no you’ll never learn

Told you once, told you twice
But deep inside I know
That some day you will turn away and hurt me so

Never learn!
No, no, no you’ll never learn

When I stood beside you I believed you, now I can not hide
The love I knew slowly faded, until it died
What must be – is to be, no one’s to blame
I just can’t feel the same without your heart

Never learn!
No, no, no you’ll never learn

Never!

A: Never Learn
B: (Hey Little Girl) Before You Go

Credits 

Sid Prosen – Producer

External Links

The Odds & Ends – “Never Learn” Audio/Video file link on Last Fm

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s The Music Machine – “The People In Me”

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Track’s Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s

Band :

The Music Machine” (Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.)

The Music Machine was an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1966. Fronted by chief songwriter and lead vocalist Sean Bonniwell, the band cultivated a characteristically dark and rebellious image reflected in an untamed musical approach. Sometimes it made use of distorted guitar lines and hallucinogenic organ parts, punctuated by Bonniwell’s distinctively throaty vocals. Although they managed to attain national chart success only briefly with two singles, the Music Machine is today considered by many critics to be one of the groundbreaking acts of the 1960s. Their style is now recognized as a pioneering force in proto-punk; yet within a relatively short period of time, they began to employ more complex lyrical and instrumental arrangements that went beyond the typical garage band format.

In 1965, the band came together as a folk rock trio known as the Raggamuffins, before expanding to the quintet that was later rechristened the Music Machine. The group was known for their style of dress, clothing themselves in all-black attire. In 1966, the Music Machine was signed to Original Sound, and released its first single “Talk Talk” in the latter half of the year, with it reaching the Top 20 of the Billboard Hot 100. Their debut album (Turn On) The Music Machine and the moderate hit “The People in Me” followed. The band’s original lineup fragmented in late 1967 after managerial and financial disputes. Bonniwell reassembled the group under the name The Bonniwell Music Machine. In 1968, a second album, The Bonniwell Music Machine appeared, but the group disbanded in early 1969.

Track :

“The People In Me” A’ Side Single ((written by Sean Bonniwell), b’ side single “Masculine Intuition”) released on Original Sound Records (OS-67) in 1967

The track is also included on the band’s debut album “(Turn On) The Music Machine” released on Original Sound Records (OSR-LPM-5015)  on 31st December 1966, recorded at RCA Recording Studios, Los Angeles California in  August 1966

Line-up :

The Music Machine :

Sean Bonniwell – Vocals, Guitars
Ron Edgar –  Drums
Mark Landon – Guitar
Keith Olsen – Bass
Doug Rhodes – Organ

Credits :

Producer :  Brian Ross

Lyrics :

Hey, Halright
Sometimes dreamin’
I’m in here schemin’ on you
Collectin’ headers
With nothin’ better to do
Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.
When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do
When you see the people in me
Minus you it’s overdue
While I’m cryin
I’m rectifyin’ the cause
Friends are cheerin’
And I’m hearin’ applause
The train is here you better run
Don’t call me I’ll never come
Unto you
They’re over now the games you play
Just what you’ll do, just what you’ll say
Uh oh you
Middle
Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.
When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do
When you see the people in me
Minus you it’s overdue
Hut, Halright
Songwriters: Sean Bonniwell

Information related to the track :

“Wikipedia”

The People in Me” is a song by the American garage rock band, The Music Machine, written by Sean Bonniwell, and was first released as a track on their debut album (Turn On) The Music Machine in December 1966 on Original Sound Records. The song was also released as the A-side to the group’s second single, which was distributed on January 21, 1967. Like many of Bonniwell’s compositions, “The People in Me”‘s lyrical content featured a gloomy rebellious mood, with eerie lead vocals by Bonniwell, and it explored with a hard-edged variation of psychedelic rock. It also featured guitarist Mark Landon’s wiry distorted guitar melodies, joined by backing vocals near the conclusion of the song.

“The People in Me”, with the flip side “Masculine Intutition”, was the final Music Machine single to chart on the Billboard Hot 100, where it peaked at number 66. Though it was considered a strong follow-up to their debut release “Talk Talk”, the song suffered from inadequate airplay when the band’s management angered radio producers for exclusively airing the single on a rival station. Bonniwell would pen much more experimental compositions, but the dispute damaged The Music Machine’s prospects for another charting hit.

Information related to the band :

“Wikipedia”

The nucleus of the band was formed when Sean Bonniwell (lead vocals, rhythm guitar) took part in a jam session with Keith Olsen (bass guitar) and Ron Edgar (drums; born Ronald Edgar on June 25, 1946 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) – both of whom he met in the folk music circuit. Bonniwell, already a practiced “folky,” possessed prior experience as a vocalist with the Wayfarers. The traditional folk combo had already enjoyed some regional success: releasing three albums, and building on the experience of Bonniwell who insisted on the importance of rehearsal. As Bonniwell traveled and recorded with the group, he began penning some material that would later surface with the Music Machine. However, still influenced by acts now considered passé, the Wayfarers’ musical conservatism became stifling to Bonniwell who wanted to explore the type of harder, cutting-edge stylistic possibilities that he eventually would find in rock. Prior to meeting, Olsen had previously performed in Gale Garnett’s backing band, and Edgar was a member of a bohemian folk quintet called the GoldeBriars. With the GoldeBriars, Edgar contributed to their unreleased third album that was originally intended for distribution on Epic Records, but the group disbanded before it could be released.

In 1965, the three formed their own folk rock group, the Raggamuffins, and began performing in Los Angeles with a repertoire that saw the band embrace a more unorthodox style, and depart from their traditional roots. The group also recorded four songs that went unreleased until the 2000 album, Ignition, which represented the transitional phase before the band developed into the Music Machine. Bonniwell and Olsen were enthusiastically experimenting with musical textures while the band arranged strict rehearsal regimens in Bonniwell’s garage. The Raggamuffins purchased hardware for a homemade fuzz-tone switch. From the onset Bonniwell ensured the group resonated like no other by instructing his bandmates to lower their instruments from the standard E note to D-flat.  As a result of the adjustment, the Raggamuffins were given a bottom-heavy and ominous sound. In addition, the group began dressing noire, while sporting dyed-black hair, and the trademark single leather glove that presented an eye-catching and unified band image, which would later become influential with certain 1970s punk acts. 

Auditions were held in early 1966 to expand the group, resulting in the recruitment of Mark Landon (lead guitar) and Doug Rhodes (organ), previously a session musician for the Association. To reflect on the revamped line-up, Bonniwell changed the band’s name to the Music Machine. Another purpose for coining the name, Bonniwell explained, was “I seguewayed [sic] all the original material with musical segueways [sic]. So we would be on stage for like an hour and ten minutes, wall-to-wall music just nonstop, which is why I called us the Music Machine”.  The band built a name for itself with its performances in local clubs in Los Angeles. With Bonniwell as the de facto leader and creative force of the band, the Music Machine began to develop a blend of gritty 60s punk and psychedelia, and a repertoire encompassing Bonniwell’s self-penned material along with some cover songs. The band’s sound was highlighted by the authoritative and versatile vocals provided by Bonniwell, with an energized technique that juxtaposed the styles of Mick Jagger and Sky Saxon. Unlike these two contemporaries, Bonniwell possessed unusually good intonation in long-sustained passages, and the ability to breakdown phrases into a series of slow pulsations. The Music Machine’s artistic stance was also highlighted by Landon’s wiry guitar playing, Olsen’s reverberant bass, and Edgar’s cymbal-punctuated drumming, which gave the band a harder-edged sound than many of their contemporaries. 

Commercial success (1966–1967) 

Record producer Brian Ross just happened upon the Music Machine at Hollywood Legion Lanes, a bowling alley that was an early stomping ground for the group, and signed them to a recording contract with Original Sound. On July 30, 1966, the band entered RCA Studios in Los Angeles to record the Bonniwell originals “Talk Talk” and “Come on In”, which was initially going to be the A-side for the group’s debut single. Bonniwell had composed “Talk Talk” a year prior to forming the band, and the studio time was marked by the Music Machine’s collective input aimed toward tightening the structure of its arrangements, including the two-note fuzz guitar riffs and Edgar’s precise drumming technique. By virtue of the group’s dedication to rehearsal, recording sessions concluded with the Music Machine requiring only three takes to complete the two songs. Though the band was satisfied with the acetate to “Come on In”, the members were convinced “Talk Talk” would propel them into the national charts. 

“Talk Talk” was released on September 10, 1966, on Original Sound, and rose to number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also peaked at number 21 on Cashbox and number 18 on Record WorldThe song’s relatively short time-length—a mere one minute and 56 seconds—made “Talk Talk” a favorable staple on Top 40 radio and its competing underground FM stations. The Music Machine’s hit was arguably the most radical single to appear on mainstream broadcasting in 1966, the phenomenon described by music historian Richie Unterberger as a “rally cry to social alienation with a mixture of sarcasm, rebellion, self-pity, and paranoia”. Indeed, Bonniwell’s progressive lyrics and arrangements have been credited with influencing the Doors and Iron Butterfly, as well as future punk bands. After the single’s release, the Music Machine embarked on a grueling three-month tour across the U.S., packaged with the Beach Boys, Question Mark and the Mysterians, and Clyde McPhatter. It concluded with the group receiving a poor response from the more conservative southern crowds, who criticized the band’s black outfits.  Nonetheless, for the most part, their unified image served well for the Music Machine’s national recognition, especially as the group made numerous appearances on the television programs Where the Action IsAmerican Bandstand, and Shindig!.

After their long national tour, the Music Machine returned to the studio to record their debut album, (Turn On) The Music Machine. Much to the disapproval of Bonniwell, his original material had to compete with dispensable cover versions of “Cherry, Cherry”, “Taxman”, “See See Rider”, and “96 Tears”, all chosen by their record label with an expectation that the well-known songs would increase record sales. One interpretation voluntarily selected by the band was a slow, moody, fuzz-laden arrangement of “Hey Joe” which bears a strong resemblance to Jimi Hendrix’s later version. Bonniwell first heard the folk standard in 1962 at a club in Hermosa Beach, and was convinced the tune’s tempo was too fast, as he unsuccessfully attempted to persuade the Wayfarers to record a slower version. He revisited the concept with altered lyrics after hearing Tim Rose’s regionally successful rendition in early 1966.  The throaty vocals, most evidently on “Hey Joe”, Bonniwell blames on recording “the Turn On album after a 30-day tour. Mark’s fingers were literally bleeding. I could hardly even speak, much less sing”. Despite the album’s shortcomings, (Turn On) The Music Machine managed to reach number 75 on the Billboard 200.  On January 21, 1967, a song taken from the album, “The People in Me”, was issued as the group’s second single but stalled at number 66 nationally after the band’s management angered radio executives for initially making the song exclusively available to a rival station. 

The Bonniwell Music Machine (1967–1969)

Immediately after (Turn On) The Music Machine was released, the band left for another U.S. tour, despite pleas by the group to arrange an appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival. In the small off-periods in their hard-pressed schedule, the Music Machine demoed a new batch of Bonniwell originals at RCA Studios in New York City and Cosimo Matassa’s facility in New Orleans, before polishing the tunes back in Los Angeles. From the sessions emerged the group’s third single “Double Yellow Line”, which was released in April 1967, and bubbled under the Billboard Hot 100 at number 111. The subsequent release, “Eagle Never Hunts the Fly” failed to chart, but is often described as Bonniwell’s tour de force—a tune Ross praised as “sonically compelling works and a lot to listen to, for the time. It was the kind of thing you just didn’t hear, you almost worried about getting those sounds onto a 45”. 

In May 1967, the original lineup recorded together for the final time, completing “Astrologically Incompatible”, “Talk Me Down”, and “The Day Today”. One problem that led to the band’s first breakup was the Music Machine name was actually owned by Ross, as a part of their production deal, awarding the group with little to no royalties. Leaving Bonniwell to carry on the project, Olsen, Edgar, and Rhodes went on to join the Millennium, a sunshine pop group conceived by singer-songwriter Curt Boettcher and Olsen. The Millennium recorded the album Begin in 1968 before disbanding. The three former members also took part in Boettcher’s next production, the studio group Sagittarius, releasing Present Tense, coupled with the moderately successful single “My World Fell Down”, before Edgar and Rhodes departed. Olsen stayed on board to record Sagittarius’ second album, The Blue Marble, and subsequently forged a successful career as a record producer in the 1970s. 

Undeterred, Bonniwell successfully negotiated his recording contract with Original Sound be transferred to Warner Bros. Records, in hopes of finding a greater degree of independence. The Music Machine’s spell with Original Sound was drawing to a conclusion, though the company did release “Hey Joe” as a single in 1968 in an attempt to cash in on Hendrix’s success with the song. There was also the Bonniwell solo project in association with producer Paul Buff that resulted in the rare “Nothing Is Too Good for My Car” single being put out under the name the Friendly Torpedoes. Writer Greg Russo, who composed the liner notes for the single’s remastered release, explains the side-project was initiated during a confusing transitional phase for Bonniwell that also generated the tune “Citizen Fear”, which did not receive distribution until the Ignition album in 2000. Free from company pressure, Bonniwell formed a new band, rechristened The Bonniwell Music Machine, with session musicians Ed Jones on bass guitar, Harry Garfield on organ, Alan Wisdom on lead guitar, and Jerry Harris on drums.

In March 1967, Bonniwell and Ross ushered in the new lineup at United Western Recorders to record the second album The Bonniwell Music MachineThe recording and mixing process was painstakingly masterminded almost solely by Bonniwell, who was appreciative of his new bandmates’ efforts to develop the album’s concept, but disillusioned by the project’s lack of cohesion.  He further explains that the “Warner Brothers album has such an eclectic approach; each track is (was) a singular, studio invention. Not only was my songwriting divergent, but my approach to recording was exploratory as well”. Six of the album’s tracks were holdovers from the first lineup’s sessions at Cosimo Matassa’s studio and RCA Studios. This resulted in a hodgepodge of musical styles, including exploratory approaches toward psychedelia and soft rock. On February 10, 1968, The Bonniwell Music Machine was released with little commercial success. Conseqently, the Bonniwell Music Machine was largely forgotten by the general public and the second lineup fragmented in July 1968.

Disbandment and aftermath

One final version of the Bonniwell Music Machine was assembled with a revolving door of musicians. Two more singles were released on the Warner Bros. label with little notice, before “Advice and Consent”, the group’s final single, was distributed on Bell Records in March 1969. Disenchanted by the music industry and having to tour against imitation Music Machine groups, Bonniwell gave up the rights to the band’s name and signed on to Capitol Records as a solo artist. Under the name T.S. Bonniwell, he recorded the album Close, which saw a poetically-inclined Bonniwell explore string and orchestral arrangements. Following the album’s release, Bonniwell departed on what he called his “westernized guru era”—studying eastern mysticism and practicing meditation and vegetarianism.

The band was all but forgotten after their dissolution, but the Music Machine and their music experienced a revival of interest in the late-1980s. It began with Rhino Records featuring tracks on the Nuggets compilation albums Nuggets Volume 1: The Hits and Nuggets, Volume 2: Punk, before releasing the album The Best of the Music Machine in 1984. Other compilations such as Beyond the GarageThe Very Best of the Music Machine, and Ignition have added to the Music Machine’s return to the public’s interest. In addition, “Talk Talk” and “Double Yellow Line” appear on the 1998 expanded box-set of Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965–1968

In 2000, Bonniwell published his autobiography Beyond the Garage, which recalled his experiences with the Music Machine and his life after the group’s disbandment. Aside from a few live performances with the Larksmen and a guest appearance on their 2006 album, Bonniwell never returned to an active music career, though he claimed to have penned over 300 songs after his tenure with the Music Machine. On December 20, 2011, Bonniwell died of lung cancer at a medical center in Visalia, California; he was 71 years old. Drummer Ronald “Ron” Edgar died on February 23, 2015 at the age of 68.

Discography

Studio albums

  • (Turn On) The Music Machine (1966)
  • The Bonniwell Music Machine (1968)

Extended plays

  • Talk Talk (1967)

Compilation albums

  • The Best of the Music Machine (1984)
  • The Music Machine (1994)
  • Beyond the Garage (1995)
  • Rock ‘n’ Roll Hits (1997)
  • Turn On: The Best of the Music Machine (1999)
  • Ignition (2000)
  • The Ultimate Turn On (2006)
  • Rarities, Vol. 1: Last Singles & Demos (2014)
  • Rarities, Vol. 2: Early Mixes & Rehearsals (2014)
  • Re-Ignition (2015)

Singles

  • “Talk Talk” b/w “Come on In” (1966)
  • “The People in Me” b/w “Masculine Intuition” (1967)
  • “Double Yellow Line” b/w “Absolutely Positively” (1967)
  • “The Eagle Never Hunts the Fly” b/w “I’ve Loved You” (1967)
  • “Hey Joe” b/w “Taxman” (1967)
  • “Advise and Consent” b/w “Mother Nature, Father Earth” (1969)

As The Bonniwell Music Machine

  • “Bottom of the Soul” b/w “Astrologically Incompatible” (1967)
  • “Me, Myself and I” b/w “Soul Love” (1968)
  • “Tin Can Beach” b/w “Time Out for a Daydream” (1968)
  • “You’ll Love Me Again” b/w “To the Light” (1968)
  • “Point of No Return” b/w “King Mixer” (1997)

Other

  • “Nothing’s Too Good for My Car” b/w “So Long Ago” (1968, as the Friendly Torpedos)

Photos related to the track :

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Single photo (A’ Side)

Image result for The Music Machine people in me original sound

The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Album cover photo (front)

THE MUSIC MACHINE TURN ON 1 (2).jpg

Photos related to the band :

Image result for music machine

Links related to the track :

The Music Machine – “The People In Me” Track’s Video on “YouTube”

The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Full Album Video on “YouTube”

The Music Machine – “(Turn On) The Music Machine” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Spotify”

Links related to the band :

The Music Machine Interview with Doug Rhodes on “Craig Morrison” Website

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Discogs”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Mark Prindle” Website

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Google Play”

The Music Machine Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Music Machine – “The Ultimate Turn On” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

 

 

 

Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) The Blues Project – “Flute Thing”

Blues Project – “Flute Thing” Video on YouTube

Category/Music Genres :

Blues, Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Band :

The Blues Project  (Greenwich Village, New York, U.S.A.)

The Blues Project Band’s Photo

Image result for poster

The Blues Project is a band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and originally split up in 1967. Their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles. They are most remembered as one of the most artful practitioners of pop music, influenced as it was by folk, blues, rhythm & blues, jazz and the pop music of the day.

Track :

“Flute Thing” (written by Al Kooper) B3 track included on the album “Projections”

Album :

“Projections” released on Verve Folkways (FT-3008) in 1966

Projections is the second album by American blues rock band The Blues Project. Produced by Tom Wilson and released by Verve/Folkways in November 1966, the album was their first studio release and examined a more rock-based sound. Jim Marshall was credited as the photographer of the album cover.

Soon after the release of this album, Al Kooper left the band in the spring of 1967 to form Blood, Sweat & Tears.

Recording :

Keyboardist and vocalist Al Kooper was the most prominent member of the band, having recently played on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. However, Projections was very much a group effort, developing the band’s unique style that drew upon blues, jazz, folk, soul, and psychedelic influences.

Kooper’s energetic arrangement of “I Can’t Keep From Crying” incorporated psychedelic and gospel elements. “Steve’s Song”, the first song ever written by guitarist Steve Katz, was intended to be titled “September Fifth”, but a miscommunication between MGM Records and the band’s manager resulted in the generic title used for the release. It features a baroque introduction featuring flute playing from Andy Kulberg. “Two Trains Running” was guitarist Danny Kalb’s tribute to Muddy Waters, one of the band’s biggest influences. This 11-minute rendition is significantly different from the original version and was developed as the band played it live. On the Projections version, one of Kalb’s guitar strings went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up, without the band stopping. “Wake Me, Shake Me” came from a traditional gospel song and was a vehicle for improvisation that the band often used to close their live shows. Kooper’s jazz-rock instrumental “Flute Thing” features a prominent flute lick played by Kulberg, as well as solos from Kooper, Kalb, and drummer Roy Blumenfeld.

According to Danny Kalb, the record company was not interested in the band’s artistic merit and “just wanted to make a few bucks”. The band was disappointed by this lack of creative input and did not see the album cover or hear the mix until the record was released.

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on Spotify

Line-up/Credits :

Band Members :

Danny Kalb – guitar, vocals

Al Kooper – keyboards, vocals

Steve Katz – guitar, harmonica, vocals, bass (track 7)

Andy Kulberg – bass, flute

Roy Blumenfeld – drums

Companies :

Record Company – MGM Records

Record Company – Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.

Published By – Sealark Enterprises

Published By – Blues Projections

Published By – Snapper Music

Published By – Arc Music (2)

Published By – Metric Music

Published By – Conrad Music

Manufactured By – MGM Records Division

Credits :

Design [Cover] – Ken Kendall

Engineer [Director] – Val Valentin

Liner Notes – Sid Bernstein

Photography By [Cover] – Jim Marshall (3)

Producer – Marcus James (2) (tracks: B3, B5), Tom Wilson (2)

Supervised By [Production Supervisor] – Jerry Schoenbaum

Track-list :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:48
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 5:20
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:35
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 12:19
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:16
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:33
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 5:59
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:12
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:29
10.Love Will Endure (Patrick Lynch, Patrick Sky) – 2:19

Mono Album :

1. I Can’t Keep From Crying (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 4:26
2. Steve’s Song (Steve Katz) – 4:58
3. You Can’t Catch Me (Chuck Berry) – 4:17
4. Two Trains Running (Mckinley Morganfield) – 11:34
5. Wake Me, Shake Me (Arranged By Al Kooper) – 5:19
6. Cheryl’s Going Home (Bob Lind) – 2:38
7. Flute Thing (Al Kooper) – 6:02
8. Caress Me Baby (Jimmy Reed) – 7:18
9. Fly Away (Al Kooper) – 3:33
10.When There’s Smoke, There’s Fire (A. Kooper, I. Levine, B. Brass) – 2:34
11.No Time Like The Right Time (Al Kooper) – 2:44

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)/track-list photo

Information about the album/band/track :

“Last Fm”

The Blues Project was a short-lived band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and split up in 1967. While their songs drew from a wide array of musical styles, they are most remembered as one of the earliest practitioners of psychedelic rock, as well as one of the world’s first jam bands, along with the Grateful Dead.

In 1964, Elektra Records produced a compilation album of various artists entitled The Blues Project which featured several white musicians from the Greenwich Village area who played acoustic blues music in the style of black musicians. One of the featured artists on the album was a young guitarist named Danny Kalb, who was paid $75 for his two songs. Not long after the album’s release, however, Kalb gave up his acoustic guitar for an electric one. The Beatles’ arrival in America earlier in the year signified the end of the folk and acoustic blues movement that had swept young America in the early 1960s. The ensuing British Invasion was the nail in the coffin. Seeing the writing on the wall, Kalb gave up acoustic blues and switched to rock and roll, as did many other aspiring American musicians during this period.

Danny Kalb’s first rock and roll band was formed in the spring of 1965, playing under various names at first, until finally settling on the Blues Project moniker as an allusion to Kalb’s first foray on record. After a brief hiatus in the summer months of 1965 during which Kalb was visiting Europe, the band reformed in September 1965 and were almost immediately a top draw in Greenwich Village. By this time, the band included Danny Kalb on guitar, Steve Katz (having recently departed the Even Dozen Jug Band) also on guitar, Andy Kulberg on bass and flute, Roy Blumenfeld on drums and Tommy Flanders on vocals.

The band’s first big break came only a few weeks later when they auditioned for Columbia Records, and failed. The audition was a success, nevertheless, as it garnered them an organist in session musician Al Kooper. Kooper had begun his career as a session guitarist, but that summer, he began playing organ when he sneaked into the “Like a Rolling Stone” recording session on Bob Dylan’s seminal album Highway 61 Revisited. In order to improve his musicianship on the new instrument, Kooper joined the Blues Project and began gigging with them almost immediately.

Soon thereafter, the Blues Project gained a record contract from Verve Records, and began recording their first album live at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich Village over the course of a week in November 1965. While the band was known for their lengthy interpretations of blues and traditional rock and roll songs (making them, along with the Grateful Dead, rock’s first “jam band”), their first album saw them rein in these tendencies because of record company wariness as well as the time restrictions of the vinyl record.

Entitled simply Live at the Café Au Go Go, the album was finished with another week of live recordings at the cafe in January 1966. By that time, vocalist Tommy Flanders had left the band and was not replaced. As a result, Flanders appears on only a few of the songs on this album.

The album was a moderate success and the band toured America to promote it. While in San Francisco in April 1966, during the height of the city’s Haight-Ashbury culture, the Blues Project played at the Fillmore Auditorium to rave reviews. Seemingly New York’s answer to the Grateful Dead, even members of the Grateful Dead who saw them play were impressed with their improvisational abilities.

Returning to New York, the band recorded their second album and first studio album in the fall of 1966, and it was released in November. Arguably better than their first album, Projections was certainly more ambitious than their first album, boasting an eclectic set of songs that ran the gamut from blues, R&B, jazz, psychedelia, and folk-rock. The centerpiece of the album was an 11-and-a-half minute version of “Two Trains Running”, which, along with other songs on the album, showed off their improvisational tendencies. One such song was the instrumental, “Flute Thing”, written by Kooper and featuring Kulberg.

Soon after the album was completed, though, the band began to fall apart. Al Kooper quit the band in the spring of 1967, and the band without him completed a third album, Live At Town Hall. Despite the name, only one song was recorded live at Town Hall, while the rest was made up of live recordings from other venues, or of studio outtakes with overdubbed applause to feign a live sound.

The Blues Project’s last hurrah was at the Monterey International Pop Festival held in Monterey, California, in June 1967. By this time, however, half the original line-up was gone and most of their early magic was, too. Al Kooper had formed his own band and played at the festival as well, but no sort of reunion was in the offing. Guitarist Steve Katz left soon thereafter, followed by founder Danny Kalb. A fourth album, 1968’s Planned Obsolescence, featured only drummer Roy Blumenfeld and bassist Andy Kulberg from the original lineup. Upon the album’s completion, the remaining members formed Seatrain.

In 1968, Al Kooper and Steve Katz joined forces once again to fulfill a desire of Al Kooper’s to form a rock band with a horn section. The resulting band was Blood, Sweat & Tears. While Kooper led the band on its first album, Child Is Father to the Man, he did not stick around for any subsequent releases. Katz, on the other hand, remained with the band into the 1970s.

The Blues Project, with a modified lineup, reformed briefly in the early 1970s, releasing three further albums: 1971’s Lazarus, 1972’s The Blues Project, and 1973’s Original Blues Project Reunion In Central Park (which featured Al Kooper but not Tommy Flanders). These albums did little to excite the public, however. Since then, the group’s activity has been confined to a few sporadic reunion concerts.

“Rockasteria Blog”

The Blues Project can be defined by those who know and understand music in different and interesting ways. I describe it as a work of determination! Take these five young musicians and their struggles of this past year; they made it without the aid of a ‘single on the charts’ and despite the economics of an almost unbroken law that says, “no hit record, you don’t survive.” But with these young men, you find that there is an exception to the rule.
The struggle has not been an easy one, and it is far from over. But— they are going to ‘make it!’ Witness their exciting performances at the Cafe Au Go Go in Greenwich  Village…. the three times they played at Central Park this past summer to SRO crowds. These are the dates that made possible the healthy ‘underground’ movement, the ever-growing grapevine that has led them to dates in San Francisco and concerts in colleges that included Rutgers, Boston U., Kent, Ithaca, Brandeis, Hobart, CCNY, Grinnell, and others. People are subscribing to the music and the originality of the Project.
On a recent trip to Hawaii, I was asked by a number of students, “When will The Blues Project be coming over?” It would not be surprising to find students in Europe and Asia asking the same question. The word is out, it is inevitable that whatever roads the words travel, the group, its music, and its station wagon will be sure to follow. Expect them to appear anywhere.
They have something to say. The world wants to listen to music—wants love and hope…and this is what The Blues Project is projecting— Love, Hope and a determination to make their sounds meaningful and lasting.
by Sid Bernstein (sometime ’round 1966)
“All Music”
One of the first album-oriented, “underground” groups in the United States, the Blues Project offered an electric brew of rock, blues, folk, pop, and even some jazz, classical, and psychedelia during their brief heyday in the mid-’60s. It’s not quite accurate to categorize them as a blues-rock group, although they did plenty of that kind of material; they were more like a Jewish-American equivalent to British bands like the Yardbirds, who used a blues and R&B base to explore any music that interested them. Erratic songwriting talent and a lack of a truly outstanding vocalist prevented them from rising to the front line of ’60s bands, but they recorded plenty of interesting material over the course of their first three albums, before the departure of their most creative members took its toll.

The Blues Project was formed in Greenwich Village in the mid-’60s by guitarist Danny Kalb (who had played sessions for various Elektra folk and folk-rock albums), Steve Katz (a guitarist with Elektra’s Even Dozen Jug Band), flutist/bassist Andy Kulberg, drummer Roy Blumenfeld, and singer Tommy Flanders. Al Kooper, in his early twenties a seasoned vet of rock sessions, joined after sitting in on the band’s Columbia Records audition, although they ended up signing to Verve, an MGM subsidiary. Early member Artie Traum (guitar) dropped out during early rehearsals; Flanders would leave after their first LP, Live at the Cafe Au-Go-Go(1966).The eclectic résumés of the musicians, who came from folk, jazz, blues, and rock backgrounds, was reflected in their choice of material. Blues by Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry tunes ran alongside covers of contemporary folk-rock songs by Eric Anderson and Patrick Sky, as well as the group’s own originals. These were usually penned by Kooper, who had already built songwriting credentials as the co-writer of Gary Lewis’ huge smash “This Diamond Ring,” and established a reputation as a major folk-rock shaker with his contributions to Dylan’s mid-’60s records. Kooper also provided the band’s instrumental highlights with his glowing organ riffs.

The live debut sounds rather tame and derivative; the group truly hit their stride on Projections (late 1966), which was, disappointingly, their only full-length studio recording. While they went through straight blues numbers with respectable energy, they really shone best on the folk and jazz-influenced tracks, like “Fly Away,” Katz’s lilting “Steve’s Song,” Kooper’s jazz instrumental “Flute Thing” (an underground radio standard that’s probably their most famous track), and Kooper’s fierce adaptation of an old Blind Willie Johnson number, “I Can’t Keep from Crying.” A non-LP single from this era, the pop-psychedelic “No Time Like the Right Time,” was their greatest achievement and one of the best “great hit singles that never were” of the decade.

The band’s very eclecticism didn’t augur well for their long-term stability, and in 1967 Kooper left in a dispute over musical direction (he has recalled that Kalb opposed his wishes to add a horn section). Then Kalb mysteriously disappeared for months after a bad acid trip, which effectively finished the original incarnation of the band. A third album, Live at Town Hall, was a particularly half-assed project given the band’s stature, pasted together from live tapes and studio outtakes, some of which were overdubbed with applause to give the impression that they had been recorded in concert.

Kooper got to fulfill his ambitions for soulful horn rock as the leader of the original Blood, Sweat & Tears, although he left that band after their first album; BS&T also included Katz (who stayed onboard for a long time). Blumenfeld and Kulberg kept the Blues Projectgoing for a fourth album before forming Seatrain, and the group re-formed in the early ’70s with various lineups, Kooper rejoining for a live 1973 album, Reunion in Central Park. The first three albums from the Kooper days are the only ones that count, though; the best material from these is on Rhino’s best-of compilation.

“Ultimate Classic Rock”

The classic lineup of the Blues Project came together in 1965 in New York’s Greenwich Village. The band featured Roy Blumenfeld (drums), Danny Kalb (guitar and vocals), Steve Katz (guitar and vocals), Al Kooper (keyboards and vocals) and Andy Kulberg (bass and flute). Projections, released in November 1966, displayed the band’s jazz, blues, folk and rock roots. Produced by Tom Wilson, it was the Blues Project’s first studio album, the follow-up to 1965’s Live at the Café au Go Go.

By 1967, after one more LP, the band began to splinter. Kooper and Katz went on to form Blood, Sweat & Tears. Blumenfeld and Kulberg, who died in 2002, formed Seatrain. Kalb continued with various lineups of the Blues Project until the early ’70s, when he emerged as a solo artist.

In exclusive interviews, the four surviving members of the Blues Project shared the stories behind the original tracks and re-arrangements that became Projections. “From what I remember, the process was, do we have enough songs?” says Katz. “I think we just had enough to do the album.”

“I Can’t Keep From Crying”
Al KOOPER: I didn’t mind “I Can’t Keep From Crying.” I didn’t mind that version. It’s an old blues song and I sort of rearranged it.

DANNY KALB: I just listened to it the other day, and there were different times during the last 40 years when I thought maybe I didn’t like what he did with it. But now I don’t feel that.  Now I feel that he took it somewhere else. And the raw energy of that tune, even though it turned to love lyrics, the love lyrics are unimportant because it’s a psychedelic adventure and a powerful gospel song together. And it makes sense.

“Steve’s Song”
STEVE KATZ: I wrote this song, the first song that I ever wrote. I called it “September Fifth.” It wasn’t even Sept. 5 yet, I just wanted to see what happened on that day. It was like a psychedelic love song. We tagged on a little baroque thing that I had written at the beginning.

AL KOOPER: When we were first putting it together, Steve and Andy came up with the intro. And Andy really wanted to play more flute, so it was a good opportunity for him to play the flute in the intro. And it worked perfectly. And what Roy was playing in the intro was really great too, arrangement-wise. I love that intro.

ROY BLUMENFELD: Andy had turned me on to Dances From Terpsichord and these little medieval drum things and stuff. So I got into that a bit. That one kind of evolved over time as we played, as it should be. We played together, that’s how it changed and developed, the intro to the tune. ‘Cause without that intro, it would have just had that … and the drum roll in. There was that sort of tension-release, what’s gonna happen next. It became an interesting sonic experience.

STEVE KATZ: I’m flat in a couple of places. I tried to do my vocal over again, and Tom Wilson said there wasn’t enough time because Eric Burdon was coming in. We were strictly by three-hour sessions and that was pretty much it. There may have been a couple of sessions that were back-to-back but it was no longer than six. We were kicked out of the studio when our sessions were finished. They didn’t really have too much faith in us, I guess. We were on the road and, of course, there were no cellphones in those days. MGM calls our manager [Jeff Chase], who is like a total idiot, and they said, “We have the artwork, we have the master tapes, but we’re missing the name of the second song on the first side.” So Jeff goes, “Second song, first side? Second song, first side? Oh, that’s Steve’s song.” They said, “Thanks, Jeff” and hung up. We get off the road a week later and I’m looking at proofs and I said, “What the hell is ‘Steve’s Song’?”

“You Can’t Catch Me”
ROY BLUMENFELD: That was a Chuck Berry tune. That one had a really cool kind of groove to it that we got into. Danny did a real sterling job of knockin’ that one out of the park when he would do it. He sung with sincerity and meaning. And that to me really trumps some kind of vocal gymnastics that people do that really don’t have that sense of connective, organic meaning to the lyrics and to the words. So I’ve gotta hand it to Danny on all that, it’s very authentic in that sense.

DANNY KALB: I always loved Chuck Berry, and he was one of my first influences as I started listening to rock ‘n’ roll, which I did early. I had a group in college, two kind of working class Italian guys and two Jewish middle class guys. It was called the Gay Notes – before gay was gay, you know? [Laughs] And we used to play Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, the great ’50s rock ‘n’ roll and we weren’t bad, we weren’t bad.

AL KOOPER: Very early in our career we backed up Chuck Berry at Town Hall in New York. It was one of our first big gigs. We opened for him and then we backed him up. It was nerve-wracking because he was very difficult to work with. Fortunately I knew all the songs so he didn’t give me any s—. He was very tough. So the rehearsal was scary. Not for me though. Also I had played rock ‘n’ roll shows in my early career when I was in the Royal Teens. I played a lot of rock ‘n’ roll shows where there were 14 bands on the bill and everybody played a couple of songs. Alan Freed shows, stuff like that. Not only was I raised on that but I also participated in it. You can stand in the wings and watch Jackie Wilson and Buddy Holly. It was unbelievable. I’ll never forget that. I used to go as a spectator in ’56 and ’57 and by ’58 and ’59, I was in the Royal Teens and so I was playing in those shows. It was a head-f— for me. It was unbelievable. It’s like God reached down and touched me.

“Two Trains Running”
STEVE KATZ: It was Danny’s tribute to Muddy Waters. Danny lived for Muddy Waters, which is sort of understandable given how wonderful, how monumental Muddy and some of his songs were. And that was one of his most monumental songs.

AL KOOPER: We started playing it and as we became a better band it became a better arrangement. And there were amazing things in it. It was a really great arrangement. It’s nothing like the Muddy Waters version.

DANNY KALB: It’s one of the great things done by any blues band there is, white or black. And we’re going through it and it’s powerful, it’s like a rock opera but short. And it’s Muddy Waters. But it’s also us. And it’s also showing that America was going down the road through music and a lot of other things of integration. The music was making people take a second look at the hatred.

AL KOOPER: What’s really funny is on the version that’s on the album, Danny’s string went out of tune and as part of the arrangement he tuned it back up. It was fabulous, we didn’t have to stop. Normally you would stop. But he made it part of the arrangement. That was a great moment.

DANNY KALB: We were up there in the studio and there’s magic in the air. We were right before the end and I hit one bad note, but I quickly made the bad note into a good note in a quarter of a second. And the thing comes together and ends right and we’ve got a masterpiece.

STEVE KATZ: There was no creativity on the engineers. They were busy setting up for Eric Burdon. They probably were bringing in microphones while we were doing our take.

DANNY KALB: I’d been playing it for a long time. I was a folk guitarist and a blues guitarist. I studied with the great Dave Van Ronk, he was my teacher. Dave was one of the greatest. A great blues singer, a great teacher and a great soul. He died a few years ago. He changed my life, he changed [Bob] Dylan’s life. We always gave tribute to our mentors. When we played on the same bill as Muddy Waters, who was our hero, a top man, we did “Two Trains Running.” After the show, his band was packing up, the show was over and I was packing up and I saw Muddy leaving the Café au Go Go and I had to find out, in my deepest part, what he thought of our version of this tune that started out in the South many years ago, before he recorded it with any electric band. And these strange white people were doing this song. What was that about? So right before Muddy opened the door to go, I went up to Muddy Waters and I said to him, “Mr. Waters — well, what did you think?” And I knew at that point that he knew what I was asking him. And he said to me, “You really got to me.” If I had died then, it would have been enough.

“Wake Me Shake Me”
AL KOOPER: There used to be a nightclub that the mob owned on 47th between Seventh and Eighth. It was called the Sweet Chariot. And it was a gospel nightclub. So they only had gospel people playing there, and the waitresses were dressed as angels. And when you walked in, they gave you a tambourine to play and then you’d leave it when you left. Now I had picked up on gospel music at a very early age because of people that I went to school with when I was like 13, 14. They turned me on to gospel music. So it was a big part of my life. So this group the Golden Chords that played at the Sweet Chariot floored me with their version of “Wake Me Shake Me.” It was so good that I couldn’t do it with the Blues Project because I knew that we couldn’t do it as good as they did. So I had to come up with my own arrangement. But it worked out very well because the band got into it and everybody played great stuff. So it was really good and it gave us a lot of room to improvise live. So it became our closer. We’d close with it. And it was a big song for us. But that’s where it came from. It’s a traditional gospel song.

DANNY KALB: Al did his own thing with it, and that’s the way it happens in music. Nothing comes from fresh air. You go to what’s useful to you. Dylan does that. Everybody does that.

“Cheryl’s Going Home”
DANNY KALB: That was a song by another composer, Bob Lind, I just listened to recently. The Blues Project version is excellent, Bob Lind’s version is excellent, it’s the best of both worlds.

STEVE KATZ: He had a hit record with “Elusive Butterfly.” I guess I had a Bob Lind album or the single, and I liked the B-side and thought it would be good for us to do. But it was an awful mix.

“Flute Thing”
AL KOOPER: One of the first rehearsals that we had as a band, Andy said to me, “I also play flute and I would like to play some flute with the band if you have anything or if you could write something where we could do that, it would be great for me.” And so I had this lick, a cadenza played by Barney Kessel as the ending lick of a song. I learned it in the late ’50s on guitar and played it more than I should have. And so that lick came to me and I thought, “That would sound great on the flute. Why don’t I just do that [demonstrates first part] and then I just needed [demonstrates second part] and I had a song for Andy.”

ROY BLUMENFELD: The lead-up to the song “Flute Thing,” that became the Muzak to a lot of folks’ acid trips out there on the West Coast. It was, so to speak, their metaphoric elevator. The tune itself started to become more of a featured flute tune. Al had a solo, Danny had a solo, Steve laid down the bass line, he wasn’t really a bass player per se. And I had a solo. My solo came after Al’s. I became inspired by a lot of very cool jazz drummers that I was listening to. I was also listening to a lot of jazz and early on, a year or two before, I’d visit Al at his apartment in New York and he had a wall of albums, long-playing records. He’d go to one, he’d pull one out, like “Salt Peanuts.” He’d play me these different tunes, go, “Check this out.” He was really inspiring me to look into other drum ideas and listen to the players because I was growing rapidly as a player and listening to a lot of stuff.

AL KOOPER: We had to play it a certain way that was more jazzy than rock ‘n’ roll. But it just showed that we can do that. So I didn’t think it was a bad thing. But I mean if you were a good jazz player and you listened to that track, you would probably go vomit. But we did the best we could and it wasn’t so bad. Considering that we were 22 or something.

“Caress Me Baby”
DANNY KALB: I think that was a good version of that Jimmy Reed song. You have to do Jimmy Reed your own way. And the great thing about the Blues Project is that’s what we did. We’re not an imitating-kind of band even though we used other people’s material very often. But just because you write your own songs, unless you’re a great songwriter like Dylan or someone like that, doesn’t mean that all your songs are great just because you wrote them. I believe in that. I believe in writing songs and I encourage it. But we were a great band. That’s all I want to say.

“Fly Away”
AL KOOPER: It’s a song I wrote about my first marriage. And I had a good arrangement for it, which my first marriage could have used. So it was easy for us to do because I just showed everybody what to play. It’s one of those ones where the arrangement was equal if not better than the song. It was a really good arrangement. And so there’s no holes in it. I think it really helped to make it work and we were all really playing together. Everybody’s playing exactly what they should play. There’s no bad parts in it. What was I influenced by? Probably more Dylan in the verses. I would say Dylan in the verses and the chorus was pretty original. I didn’t take that from anybody. Except in the arrangement there’s maybe a little “Down in the Boondocks.”

DANNY KALB: Unfortunately, the record company just wanted to make a few bucks. They were not interested in the artists, and on the back of Projections, one of the great albums of the ’60s, I don’t think our names are on it. That’s criminal.

STEVE KATZ: I have to say that our record company was really awful. There were things like that that were missed. From changing the name of my song, from not giving us enough studio time, not putting our names on it. There were just a lot of mistakes. There always were with Verve Folkways. It was awful.

AL KOOPER: We never saw the cover until it was in the store, and all stuff like that. We had zero control. We never heard the mixes ’till it was in the store.

DANNY KALB: I think that the way the Blues Project has been either forgotten or dissed is disgraceful. We were one of the most exciting bands in the period. We took big chances, spiritually and musically, and this is crap.

Photos related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (front)

THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS 3 (2).jpg

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album cover photo (back)

 THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS 2 (2)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (A’ Side)

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album photo  (B’ Side)

Photos related to the band :

Image result for blues project

The Blues Project Matrix Concert Poster, 1966

Staples Concert Event Poster 1967 by Dave Withers

THE BLUES PROJECT POSTER 1 (2)

American band The Blues Project in concert at the Cafe Au Go Go, a nightclub in Greenwich Village, New York City, circa 1965. Singer Danny Kalb is in the centre. (Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

The Blues Project : News Photo

Psychedelic blues-rock band The Blues Project (l-r Danny Kalb, Steve Katz, Al Kooper, Roy Blumenfeld, Andy Kulberg) perform at the Cafe Au Go Go in June, 1967 in New York City, New York. (Photo by David Gahr/Getty Images)

Blues Project At The Cafe Au Go Go In NYC  : News Photo

The Blues Project, Monterey, 1967

Image result for al kooper blues project

Image result for the blues project 1966

Links related to the album/track :

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Video Playlist on “YouTube”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Audio Playlist on “Napster”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Rockasteria” Blog

The Blues Project – “Projections” Full Album Download Link on “Willie Said”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Article on the album on “The Music Court”

The Blues Project – “Projections” Album’s Review/Article about the band on “Best Classic Bands”

 

Links related to the band :

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Spotify”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Facebook”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Setlist Fm”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Apple Music”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Google Play”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Deezer”

The Blues Project Band’s Page on “Tidal”

Steve Katz (The Blues Project) Interview on “Keep The Blues Alive”

Al Kooper (The Blues Project) Artist’s Interview on “Rock Of Ages”

 

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s Edges Of Wisdom – “That Lonely Road”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s (Tracks) 

Edges Of Wisdom (Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.)

“That Lonely Road” (written Paul Mysyk, Perry Johnson) B’ Side single released on Redd Robb Records in December 1966 ( A’ Side single “The Past”)

Don Hudson (guitar) 

Edges Of Wisdom – “That Lonely Road” Single photo (A’ Side)

edges of wisdom 3

Edges Of Wisdom – “That Lonely Road” B’ Side single photo

edges of wisdom 2 (2)

 

Edges Of Wisdom – “That Lonely Road” Video file link on YouTube

Edges Of Wisdom Band’s Page on Discogs

Edges Of Wisdom Band’s Page on Rate Your Music

 

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s We The People – “In The Past”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s 

We The People (Orlando, Florida, U.S.A.)

“In The Past” (written by Wayne Proctor) A’ Side single released on Challenge Records ( 59351) in 1966

Line-up/Credits :

Tommy Talton – Vocals, Guitar
Wayne Proctor – Guitar
Lee Ferguson – Drums
Randy Boyte – Keyboards
David Duff – Bass

Lyrics :

Try, my friend, loving all
The things we used to love
I realize there was not
Very much to love
But that’s no reason
To go on living in the past

Try, my friend, doing all
The things we used to do
If you could count on me
It would be darkest blue
Give me another chance
I love you more than in the past

It’s up to you to do
The things I want you to
Don’t question me
It’s gotta be this way

Please, my friend, hear me out
Before you have to go
It’s time you understood
I think you ought to know
Give me another chance
I love you more than in the past

We The People – “In The Past” A’ side single photo

WE THE PEOPLE IN THE PAST 1

We The People – “In The Past” Video file link on YouTube

We The People – “In The Past” Video file link on DailyMotion

We The People Band’s page on Spotify

We The People – “Too Much Noise” Full compilation album video file link on YouTube

We The People – “Too Much Noise” Full compilation album download file link on Rockasteria Blog

We The People – “Too Much Noise” Full album download file link on 60-70 Rock Blog

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock Bermuda 1960s The Savages – “The World Ain’t Round It’s Square”

7-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock Bermuda 1960s 

The Savages  (Bermuda)

“The World Ain’t Round It’s Square” (written by Howie Rego and Bobby Zuill)

A’ Side single released on Duane Records (Duane 45-1054) in 1966

Line-up/Credits :

Paul Muggleton (guitar, vocals)

Jimmy O’Connor (guitar, vocals)

Bobby Zuill (bass, vocals)

Howie Rego (drums)

Engineer – Chuck Irwin

Producer – Eddy De Mello

The Savages – “The World Ain’t Round It’s Square” A’ Side single photo

THE SAVAGES THE WORLD AINT ROUND ITS SQUARE

 

The Savages – “The World Ain’t Round It’s Square” Video file link on YouTube

 

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s The Odds And Ends – ” Never Learn”

7/12-inch Singles/E.P.s Garage/Psychedelic Rock U.S.A. 1960s

The Odds And Ends (U.S.A.)

” Never Learn” (written by M. Marotta/S. Prosen) A Side single 

Released in September 1966 on Red Bird Records (RB 10-83)

The Odds And Ends – “Never Learn” Single photo (A’ Side)

THE ODD AND ENDS 1

 

The Odds And Ends – “Never Learn” Video file link on YouTube